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Newfoundland and Labrador Resource Guide

Kids Boost Immunity matches the Newfoundland and Labrador curriculum outcomes listed below. You can also read a description of the core lessons available for Newfoundland and Labrador students. Each grade has a tailored selection of lessons that fit their curricular need. Please note that this is not an exhaustive list of the curricular fit - teachers on KBI have found many more curriculum connections than outlined here! Continue scrolling down to see a short description of the core lessons available for each grade.

 

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Newfoundland and Labrador curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Science

STSE

  • 1.0 propose questions to investigate and practical problems to solve [GCO 2]
  • 2.0 rephrase questions in a testable form [GCO 2]
  • 3.0 state a prediction and a hypothesis [GCO 2]
  • 4.0 identify various methods for finding answers to questions and solutions to problems, and select one that is appropriate [GCO 2]
  • 5.0 devise procedures to carry out a fair test and to solve a practical problem [GCO 2]
  • 7.0 carry out procedures to explore a given problem and to ensure a fair test, controlling major variables [GCO 2]
  • 13.0 identify and use a variety of sources and technologies to gather relevant information [GCO 2]
  • 15.0 classify according to several attributes and create a chart or diagram that shows the method of classifying [GCO2]

Social Studies

Unit 2: The Nature of Exploration

4.1 Explain how exploration changes our understanding of the world

4.2 Evaluate the consequences of exploration

  • Sample Teaching & Assessment Strategies - Students may: Record on a class chart the information students know about vaccines. As a class, develop questions about the discovery and uses of these vaccines that they want a medical professional to answer. (E.g., What disease does the vaccine protect against? How many people used to be affected by the disease?) Invite that person to visit the class and answer their questions. Add any new information to the class chart. Correct any misinformation.

Unit 3: Exploring Our World

5.1 Identify the continents and oceans

  • In order to assist with this exploration, students will need to build on their understanding of the four cardinal directions (Grade 3) and practice using the intermediate directions when identifying relative location (e.g., northwest of…). Additionally, students are introduced to the concepts of hemisphere, pole, equator, and prime meridian. These concepts are used to help students gain an awareness of longitude and latitude in determining absolute location.

7.0 The student will be expected to demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between humans and the physical environment

  • 7.2 Describe the challenges posed by the physical environment

Unit 4: Exploring the Landscapes of Canada

10.0 The student will be expected to demonstrate an understanding of the political landscape of Canada

  • 10.1 Explain how the federal government is organized
  • 10.2 Explain how the federal government operates

Health

Self Care

  • 2. identify some ways to prevent the spread of communicable diseases,
  • 3. know that the immune system is the body’s defence against disease,
  • 4. understand the purpose of immunization,
  • 5. demonstrate proper handwashing practice, and
  • 6. rate personal health habits and practices in relation to caring for oneself

Consumer Health

  • 3.  identify various sources of health-related information

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Newfoundland and Labrador curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Science

Unit 4: Body Systems

STSE

Students will develop an understanding of the nature of science and technology, of the relationships between science and technology, and of the social and environmental contexts of science and technology

  • 31.0 describe examples of tools and techniques that have contributed to scientific discoveries
  • 36.0 identify examples of scientific questions and technological problems addressed in the past
  • 37.0 describe and compare tools, techniques, and materials used by different people in their community and region to meet their needs
    • Students should brainstorm and describe examples of technologies, both products and processes, used in their community or region to help people maintain their health (e.g., breast feeding, flu shots, hand sanitizer, iodized salt, medical checkups, nutritional drinks, medications, personal protective equipment, sports safety equipment, seat belts, soap dispensers, sunblock, vaccines, water bottle refilling stations, water treatment and fluoridation).
  • 38.0 identify individuals in their community who work in science and technology related areas
  • 40.0 provide examples of how science and technology have been used to solve problems in their community and region
  • 49.0 describe examples of technologies that have been developed to improve living conditions
  • 63.0 demonstrate processes for investigating scientific questions and solving technological problems

Skills

Students will develop the skills required for scientific and technological inquiry, for solving problems, for communicating scientific ideas and results, for working collaboratively, and for making informed decisions

  • 1.0 propose a question to investigate and practical problem to solve
  • 2.0 rephrase questions in a testable form
  • 8.0 carry out procedures to explore a given problem and to ensure a fair test, controlling major variables
  • 19.0 identify and suggest explanations for patterns and discrepancies in the data collected
  • 20.0 evaluate the usefulness of different information sources in answering a question

Knowledge

Students will construct knowledge and understandings of concepts in life science, physical science, and Earth and space science, and apply these understandings to interpret, integrate, and extend their knowledge.

  • 67.0 describe how body systems help humans meet their basic needs
  • 71.0 describe the body’s defenses against infections
    • Students should describe the body’s two primary lines of defence against infection:
    • The first line of defense consists of physical and chemical barriers. Skin provides a physical barrier. Tears, ear wax, saliva, mucus, and stomach acids are some of the liquids the body produces to protect vulnerable surfaces. These liquids either trap and sweep germs away or contain chemicals which destroy them.
    • The second line of defense is the body’s immune system. White blood cells detect germs that get past the first line of defence and make antibodies which attach to and destroy them.
    • Note that “germ” is used in this curriculum to represent infection causing organisms (e.g., some bacteria and viruses).
    • Students should describe active immunity; the ability of the immune system to rapidly respond to a reinfection by a previously encountered germ. The antibodies made by white blood cells to destroy a specific germ, remain in the blood long after the infection. As a result, the body retains a “memory” of the specific germ. This enables rapid response to reinfection by the same germ.
    • Student understanding of active immunity should be applied to explain how vaccines work. Vaccines contain partially destroyed germs that are incapable of causing illness. When inoculated with them, the body makes and retains “memories” of antibodies to destroy. If the body is ever infected by these live germs, the immune “knows” how to destroy them and rapidly responds.
    • Students should engage in a directed activity to model how easily germs can spread.
    • Cross curricular connections can be made to Health outcomes related to personal hygiene and prevention of disease.
    • Teachers may • Provide examples of and discuss diseases covered by vaccinations available in Newfoundland and Labrador.

Attitude

Encourage students to appreciate the role and contribution of science and technology in their understanding of the world.


Social Studies

Unit i: Integrated Concepts and Processes

  • icp.1 use an inquiry model to create, explore and resolve significant questions
  • icp.2 analyze events, ideas, issues, patterns and trends
  • icp.3 make judgments based on appropriate criteria

Unit 1: Exploring the Past: How do we learn about the past?

1.0 - Students are expected to demonstrate an understanding of how we learn about the past.

  • 1.1 explain how primary sources are used to construct historical knowledge

Unit 2: Environment: How were past societies influenced by environment?

2.0 - Students are expected to explain how environment influenced the development of an ancient society

  • locate and describe the society using geographic concepts
    • using latitude and longitude to describe absolute locations.

Unit 5: Interactions: How are societies influenced by interactions with other societies?

6.3   compare interactions that occurred between settlers and First Nation and Inuit societies

  • While investigating the consequences of interactions in the Atlantic region it is important that students recognize both positive and negative consequences of interactions for all peoples. For example:
    • the introduction of diseases – smallpox, influenza, and measles – decimated indigenous societies;
    • the technological and medical contributions of First Nation and Inuit societies that enabled British and French settlers to adapt to their new environment. (e.g., use of botanicals for healing and technologies such as snow goggles).

Health

Physical Growth and Development

  • 4. propose ways to maintain a healthy respiratory system,

Self Care

  • 6. explain the difference between virus and bacteria

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Newfoundland and Labrador curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Science

Unit i: Integrated Skills
Students will develop the skills required for scientific and technological inquiry, for solving problems, for communicating scientific ideas and results, for working collaboratively, and for making informed decisions.

  • 1.0 propose questions to investigate and practical problems to solve
  • 2.0 rephrase questions in a testable form
  • 3.0 state a prediction and a hypothesis
  • 5.0 identify and control major variables in investigations
  • 6.0 identify various methods for finding answers to questions and solutions to problems, and select one that is appropriate
  • 7.0 devise procedures to carry out a fair test and to solve a practical problem
  • 14.0 identify and use a variety of sources and technologies to gather relevant information
  • 17.0 classify according to several attributes and create a chart or diagram that shows the method of classifying
    • Classification is a method of analysis and interpretation. Students should create a chart or diagram to show their classification method (e.g., dichotomous key, tree diagram, Venn diagram, Carroll diagram).
  • 20.0 evaluate the usefulness of different information sources in answering a question
  • 21.0 draw a conclusion that answers an initial question

Unit 4: Diversity of Life

STSE
Students will develop an understanding of the nature of science and technology, of the relationships between science and technology, and of the social and environmental contexts of science and technology.

  • 28.0 demonstrate that specific terminology is used in science and technology contexts
    • With a focus on the Eukarya domain, students learn the key characteristics of all living things and then those of plants, animals, and fungi.
  • 29.0 describe how evidence must be continually questioned in order to validate scientific knowledge
  • 52.0 provide examples of how science and technology have been used to solve problems around the world
  • 76.0 identify examples of careers in which science and technology play a major role

Skills
Students will develop the skills required for scientific and technological inquiry, for solving problems, for communicating scientific ideas and results, for working collaboratively, and for making informed decisions

  • 1.0 propose questions to investigate and practical problems to solve
  • 6.0 identify various methods for finding answers to given questions and solutions to given problems and select one that is appropriate
  • 14.0 identify and use a variety of sources and technologies to gather relevant information
  • 20.0 evaluate the usefulness of different information sources in answering a question

Knowledge
Students will construct knowledge and understandings of concepts in life science, physical science, and Earth and space science, and apply these understandings to interpret, integrate, and extend their knowledge.

  • 68.0 describe the role of a common classification system for living things
  • 72.0 examine and describe some living things that cannot be seen with the naked eye

Attitude
Students will be encouraged to develop attitudes that support the responsible acquisition and application of scientific and technological knowledge to the mutual benefit of self, society, and the environment.


Social Studies

Unit 5: World Issues
6.5.1 analyse the effects of the distribution of wealth around the world

  • use statistical data to represent the distribution of wealth around the world
  • examine the effects of the uneven distribution of wealth on quality of life
  • define poverty and give examples of its effects

6.5.2 examine selected examples of human rights issues around the world

  • identify human rights issues related to rights of children
  • examine selected examples of current human rights abuses

6.5.3 take age-appropriate actions to demonstrate an understanding of responsibilities as global citizens

  • explain the rights and responsibilities of being a global citizen
  • support a position on a local/national/ international issue after considering various perspectives
  • plan and take age-appropriate actions to address, local, national, international problems or issues

Health

Self Care

  • 1. discuss how prevention and early detection relate to wellness
  • 3. describe the methods of transfer of common communicable diseases,

Consumer Health

  • 1. list some of the contributions made by medical research to the cure of diseases and illnesses,
  • 2. discuss some of the current research on health-related topics,
  • 3. discuss the effectiveness of some health products in treating illness,
  • 4. recognize the need for professional services when health care is required,

Math

Ratio and Percent

Develop number sense.

  • SCO 6N5 Demonstrate an understanding of ratio, concretely
  • SCO 6N6 Demonstrate an understanding of percent (limited to whole numbers), concretely, pictorially and symbolically

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Newfoundland and Labrador curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Science

STSE

  • 109-12 distinguish between terms that are scientific or technological and those that are not
  • 109-13 explain the importance of choosing words that are scientifically and technologically appropriate
  • 111-1 provide examples of scientific knowledge that have resulted in the development of technologies
  • 112-4 provide examples of Canadian institutions that support scientific and technological endeavours
  • 112-8 provide examples to illustrate that scientific and technological activities take place in a variety of individual or group settings
  • 113-11 propose a course of action on social issues related to science and technology, taking into account personal needs

Skills

  • 208-2 identify questions to investigate arising from practical problems and issues
  • 208-5 state a prediction and a hypothesis based on background information or an observed pattern of events

Knowledge

  • 304-1 explain how biological classification takes into account the diversity of life on Earth 

Social Studies

Unit 2: Economic Empowerment

7.1.1 explore the general concept of empowerment:

  • Define power and authority and explain how each influences their own lives
  • Identify and categorize various sources of power and authority
  • Identify groups that are empowered and disempowered in our society (local, national, and global)

7.2.2 Investigate the various ways economic systems empower or disempower people

  • explain that people have basic needs that must be met
  • analyze the role that money plays in meeting basic needs
  • investigate and report on the challenges of the poverty cycle

Unit 3: Political Empowerment

7.2.3 Analyze trends that could impact future economic empowerment 

  • identify current trends and examine factors that may impact on these trends
  • take actions which provide or enable personal economic empowerment in the future

7.3.4 Examine the political structure of Canada as a result of Confederation

  • chart the structure of the Canadian government after Confederation
  • compare and contrast the power given to the different levels of government by the BNA Act
  • explain the role of the individual in the democratic process in Canada

Health

Human Sexuality

  • 10. To be aware of the common sexually transmitted diseases and how they endanger health
  • 11. To understand how sexually transmitted diseases are contracted

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Newfoundland and Labrador curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Science

STSE

  • 109-13 explain the importance of choosing words that are scientifically or technologically appropriate
  • 110-2 distinguish between ideas used in the past and theories used today to explain natural phenomena
  • 111-5 describe the science underlying particular technologies designed to explore natural phenomena, extend human capabilities, or solve practical problem
  • 112-10 provide examples of science- and technology-based careers in their province or territory
  • 113-8 make informed decisions about applications of science and technology, taking into account personal and social advantages and disadvantages

Skills

  • 208-1 rephrase questions in a testable form and clearly define practical problems
  • 208-6 design an experiment and identify major variables
  • 209-1 carry out procedures controlling the major variables
  • 210-7 identify and suggest explanations for discrepancies in data

Knowledge

  • 304-4 illustrate and explain that the cell is a living system that exhibits all the characteristics of life

Social Studies

Unit 1 - Introduction: History as a Lens to the Past
SCO 1.2 The student will be expected to demonstrate an understanding of how to find out about the past

  • 1.2.1 Distinguish between a primary source and a secondary source. (K)
  • 1.2.3 Formulate a key question that is supported by a given source. (A)

Skills Overview

  • 1. Frame questions or hypotheses that give clear focus to an inquiry.
  • 2. Solve problems creatively and critically.
  • 3. Recognize significant issues and perspectives in an area of inquiry.
  • 4. Identify sources of information relevant to the inquiry.
  • 5. Gather, record, evaluate, and synthesize information.
  • 6. Draw conclusions supported by the evidence.

Health

  • 12. To explore concerns with respect to sexually transmitted diseases

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Newfoundland and Labrador curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Science

Unit 4: Reproduction

STSE

  • 113-10 Provide examples of problems that arise at home, in an industrial setting, or in the environment that cannot be solved using scientific and technological knowledge
    • Suggested Assessment Strategies - In small groups, brainstorm and discuss the positive and negative effects of mutations in the genetic code (i.e. curing/ treating diseases; organisms developing resistance to control agents (mosquitoes developing resistance to pesticides, bacteria developing resistance to antibiotics); diseases becoming more virulent due to mutation (flu pandemics)). (113-10)

Social Studies

Unit 4: Historical Influences on Identity II: Part of the Global Community (1945 - Present)
SCO 8.0 - The student will be expected to demonstrate an understanding of Canada’s role in world affairs since 1945

  • 8.2 examine Canada’s participation in NATO, NORAD, and the United Nations

SCO 11 - The student will be expected to demonstrate an understanding of the effect of globalization on Canada since 1980

  • 11.1 explain the concept of globalization and its relationship to economic, political and social change
  • 11.3 explain the causes and consequences of economic globalization

Unit 5: Citizenship and Identity: What it Means to be Canadian
SCO 14 - The student will be expected to demonstrate an understanding of the structure and operation of government in Canada under a federal system

  • 14.1 describe the organization of government in Canada at the federal, provincial and municipal levels

Health

Knowledge and Understanding

  • 12. be knowledgable about Sexually Transmitted Infections (STI’s).

Skills and Abilities

  • 1. assess strategies that could be employed to prevent the contraction and spread of STI’s.
  • 2. be aware of the implications of contracting an STI on the reproductive and sexual health of self and others.

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Newfoundland and Labrador curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Science 1206

Unit 2: Chemical Reactions
23.0 propose alternative solutions to a given practical problem, identify the potential strengths and weaknesses of each, and select one as the basis for a plan [GCO 2]

  • Focus for Learning - Additionally, students should research chemistry-related, STSE issues or problems. Topics could include • societal use of antibacterial products, antibiotics...

Social Studies 1201/1202

Unit 1: Integrated Concepts and Process Skills (ICPS)

  • 2.0 analyze information, events, ideas, issues, places, and trends to understand how they influence the human experience
    • 2.1 evaluate evidence
    • 2.2 make comparisons
    • 2.3 determine cause and consequence
    • 2.4 determine significance
  • 3.0 respond to significant issues influencing the human experience
    • 3.1 frame questions to focus an inquiry
    • 3.2 gather and organize information
    • 3.3 interpret, analyze, and evaluate information
    • 3.4 develop rational conclusions supported by evidence

Unit 2: Power, Citizenship, and Change

  • 4.0 explain how power and privilege influence people’s lives
    • 4.7 explain how privilege influences an individual’s ability to achieve personal goals
    • 4.8 explain the consequences of privilege and underprivilege for a group or community
  • 5.0 explain the importance of activism in promoting social justice
    • 5.1 explain the purpose of activism
    • 5.3 develop an activism plan to promote social justice
    • 5.4 explain why people may fail to act when they observe a social injustice

Unit 3: Individual Righst and the Common Good

  • 7.0 explain some of the challenges associated with promoting the common good
    • 7.1 explain the idea of the common good
    • 7.4 propose an action that would promote the common good

Unit 4: The Strengths and Limitations of Government

  • 8.0 explain how government is organized in Canada
    • 8.3 determine the relative significance of the responsibilities assigned to the federal, provincial, municipal, and Indigenous governments
  • 10.0 explain the importance of voting within a democracy
    • 10.6 assess information and differentiate between fact, opinion, argument, and propaganda

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Newfoundland and Labrador curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Biology 2201

  • 1.0 define and delimit problems to facilitate investigation
  • 2.0 identify questions to investigate that arise from practical problems and issues
  • 3.0 design an experiment identifying and controlling major variables
  • 4.0 formulate operational definitions of major variables
  • 5.0 develop and implement appropriate sampling procedures
  • 6.0 carry out procedures controlling the major variables and adapting or extending procedures where required
  • 9.0 use library and electronic research tools to collect information on a given topic
  • 12.0 describe and apply classification systems and nomenclatures used in the sciences

Unit 2: Processes that Sustain Life

  • 26.0 identify and describe science- and technology-based careers related to this science
  • 37.0 explain the roles of evidence, theories, and paradigms in the development of scientific knowledge
  • 43.0 compare and contrast prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, and plant cells and animal cells

Unit 3: Maintaining Homeostasis

  • 32.0 analyze from a variety of perspectives the risks and benefits to society and the environment of applying scientific knowledge or introducing a particular technology
    • Teachers may
      • Discuss the issues of antibiotic overuse and resistance.
      • Discuss mandatory vaccination policies.
      • Invite public health personnel to present current information on vaccinations and related topics.
  • Students may
    • Explain how a child vaccinated for measles is protected when they come in contact with the virus.
    • Research and analyze the risks and benefits to society of widespread use of antibacterial soaps and other products.
  • 36.0 propose courses of action on social issues related to science and technology, taking into account an array of perspectives, including that of sustainability
  • 41.0 analyze why and how a particular technology was developed and improved over time
    • analyze why and how technologies such as antibiotics and vaccinations were developed and improved over time; and
    • examine the important role vaccinations play in maintaining a healthy society.
    • Discussions about antibiotic use and vaccinations provide an opportunity to address aspects of the nature of technology and the relationship between science, technology, and society
    • Sample Performance Indicator - Analyze and respond to a vaccination-related article sourced from the Internet.
  • 50.0 explain how systems help maintain homeostasis
  • 51.0 analyze homeostatic phenomena to identify the feedback mechanisms involved
  • 52.0 explain how tropisms help to maintain homeostasis
  • 53.0 analyze the impact of factors on the homeostasis of the nervous system
  • 54.0 evaluate the impact of disorders and diseases on homeostasis
    • Teachers may
      • Show videos sourced from the Internet to introduce the immune system and examine the body’s immune response.
      • Discuss the human immune system’s lines of defense.
      • Discuss innate and acquired immunity and the role of macrophages, lymphocytes, and antibodies.
      • Provide information and resources about immunization in Canada, including a list of available vaccines.
      • Discuss what is meant by herd immunity.
    • Students may
      • Add immune-related terminology to their personal glossary of circulatory system terminology.
      • Search for and examine timelines depicting the history of vaccines or immunization.
      • Research how penicillin was discovered and discuss the quote “In the fields of observation chance favours only the prepared mind”. 
      • Describe how antibiotics work in concert with the immune system.
  • 56.0 explain the importance of fitness to the maintenance of homeostasis
  • 58.0 describe the impact of environmental factors on homeostasis
  • 59.0 explain the role of enzymes in metabolism
  • 60.0 explain the importance of nutrition to the maintenance of homeostasis

Social Studies 2201/2202

Unit 2: Innovation, Ideas, and Change

  • 4.0 explain how innovations influence the human experience
    • 4.4 explain the significance of select innovations from the Ancient, Pre-Modern, and Modern Eras
      • Activation - Introduce one (or more) of the innovations examined in this delineation by engaging students in a discussion on the innovation. First, ask students how we use the innovation today (and in the past). Next, ask students to identify how our lives would be different if the innovation never existed. Examples include vaccinations.
      • Focus for Learning - Students should be able to explain how innovations influenced life during the Modern Era. • Health care: smallpox vaccine - In the late 1700s smallpox was a deadly and highly infectious disease responsible for the deaths of hundreds of millions across the globe. Edward Jenner, an English doctor, discovered how to create a vaccine, which he used to cure smallpox, Thanks to Jenner’s vaccine, the last recorded death from smallpox occurred in 1978.
      • Focus for Learning - Perspectives/Value Judgments: Today, before a drug is sold to the public, it is clinically tested to ensure any dangers or side effects associated with the drug are known. Edward Jenner simply tested his ideas concerning smallpox using a live cowpox vaccine on a patient not knowing the consequences of his theory. Can such a risky and ethically questionable action ever be justified in the medical field? Explain.
      • Sample Teaching and Assessment Strategies - Students may • Create a cause and consequence diagram for each of the following innovations: smallpox vaccine

Unit 5 – Conflict, Cooperation, and Change

  • 14.0 explain how ideology has influenced the human experience in the Modern Era
  • 14.2 explain how modern ideological thinking has influenced the use of conflict and cooperation to achieve political and economic goals
  • 14.3 explain the role of supranational agencies such as the United Nations in addressing global issues
  • 15.0 determine the possible significance a current or emerging geopolitical dispute
  • 15.1 research the dispute
    • Examples may include: civil war in Syria
  • 15.2 anticipate how the dispute may influence the human experience

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Newfoundland and Labrador curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Biology 3201

STSE

  • 115-5 analyse why and how a particular technology was developed and improved over time
  • 116-4 analyse and describe examples where technologies were developed based on scientific understanding
  • 117-11 analyse examples of Canadian contributions to science and technology
  • 118-8 distinguish between questions that can be answered by science and those that cannot, and between problems that can be solved by technology and those that cannot
  • 118-10 propose courses of action on social issues related to science and technology, taking into account an array of perspectives, including that of sustainability

Skills

  • 212-6 design an experiment and identify specific variables

Unit 1: Maintaining Dynamic Equilibrium 2

  • 317-1 explain how different plant and animal systems, including the vascular and nervous systems, help maintain homeostasis
  • 317-2 analyse homeostatic phenomena to identify the feedback mechanisms involved
  • 317-4 evaluate the impact of viral, bacterial, genetic and environmental diseases on an organism’s homeostasis

Unit 3: Genetic Continuity

  • 317-4 identify in general terms the impact of viral, bacterial, genetic and environmental diseases on the homeostasis of an organism

World History

Unit 6: Challenges of the Modern Era

  • 6.1 Students will be expected to draw upon primary and/or secondary sources to demonstrate an understanding of selected security, economic and environmental challenges of the modern era.
  • 6.1.2 Analyze examples to illustrate three peackeeping roles that UN forces are sometimes called upon to perform in the trouble areas of the world: (a) • mediation of disputes between conflicting parties • deployment of military forces to maintain peace in civil or international wars • deployment of military forces to ensure distribution of humanitarian aid
  • 6.1.4 Assess how the re-emergence of nationalism, ethnic diversity and religious differences have created conflict
  • 6.1.6 Analyze how terrorist attacks such as those on the World Trade Centre and suicide bombings in Israel have posed threats to world peace and security.

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

Last modified: 
Sep 8, 2020