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Ontario Guide, Outcomes, and Lessons

Kids Boost Immunity matches the Ontario curriculum outcomes listed below. You can also read a description of the core lessons available for Ontario students. Each grade has a tailored selection of lessons that fit their curricular need. Please note that this is not an exhaustive list of the curricular fit - teachers on KBI have found many more curriculum connections than outlined here! Continue scrolling down to see a short description of the core lessons available for each grade.

 

Click here to access the Curriculum Connections showing curriculum outcomes for the different KBI learning modules/lessons and links to accompanying lesson resources.

Made by a Grade 4 teacher in Ontario. 

Kids Boost Immunity (KBI) provides educational content (lessons and support materials) developed by teachers and where needed, health experts, that is directly linked to curriculum and is available completely for free. Each lesson is paired with an online quiz that students can take on a laptop, tablet, or phone. Every time a student scores 80% or higher on a quiz, we donate life-saving vaccines to UNICEF Canada. To learn more about KBI, click here.

Click on the overarching curriculum themes below to see the curriculum outcomes that match KBI educational content.

Knowledge is Power

Curricular outcomes:

ELA: Digital Media Literacy

  • A2.2- demonstrate an understanding of how to navigate online environments safely, manage their privacy and personal data, and interact in a way that supports their well-being and that of others, including seeking appropriate permission
  • A2.3- gather, evaluate, and use information, considering validity, credibility, accuracy, and perspectives, to construct knowledge, create texts, and demonstrate learning
  • A2.4- demonstrate an understanding of the forms, conventions, and techniques of digital and media texts, consider the impact on the audience, and apply this understanding when analyzing and creating texts
  • A2.5- demonstrate an understanding of the interrelationships between the form, message, and context of texts, the intended audience, and the purpose for production

ELA: Critical Thinking In Literacy

  • C3.5- identify explicit and implicit perspectives communicated in various texts, explain how these perspectives are conveyed, give some evidence of any biases the texts may contain, and suggest how such biases could influence an audience

Science: Scientific Expectations

  • A1.1- use a scientific research process and associated skills to conduct investigations
  • A1.2- use a scientific experimentation process and associated skills to conduct investigations
  • A1.5- communicate their findings, using science and technology vocabulary and formats that are appropriate for specific audiences and purposes

Health

  • D1.2 – Identify risks associated with the use of communications technology, including Internet use, texting, and gaming, and describe precautions and strategies for using these technologies safely. 

Applicable KBI lessons:

1. Critical Thinking & Evaluating Information

Unit Plan Overview

  • Literacy builder worksheet/answer guide
  • Lesson worksheet/answers
  • Video worksheet/answers
  • Inquiry activities/answer guides
  • Numeracy activity/answers
Community

Curriculum outcomes:

Science: Life Science 

  • B1.1- assess positive and negative impacts of human activities on habitats and communities, while taking different perspectives into account
  • B1.2- analyse the impact of the depletion or extinction of a species on its habitat and community, and describe possible actions to prevent such depletions or extinctions
  • B2.3- describe the relationship of organisms in a food chain, and classify organisms as producers, consumers, or decomposers
  • B2.4- demonstrate an understanding of a food web as the interconnection of multiple food chains in a natural community
  • B2.5- describe how animals are categorized according to their diet, and categorize various animals as carnivores, herbivores, or omnivores

Science: STEM Skills & Connections

  • A3.3- analyse contributions to science and technology from various communities

Social Studies: Heritage & Identity 

  • A1.2- compare aspects of the daily lives of different groups within a few early societies, including at least one First Nation and one Inuit society, and explain how differences were related to the social organization of that society
  • A1.4- compare a few early societies, including at least one First Nation and one Inuit society, in terms of their relationship with the environment, and describe some key similarities and differences in environmental practices between these societies and present-day Canada
  • A2.5- evaluate evidence and draw conclusions about ways of life and relationships with the environment in a few early societies, including at least one First Nation and one Inuit society, with an emphasis on aspects of the interrelationship between the environment and life in those societies
  • A3.2- demonstrate the ability to extract information on daily life in a few early societies, including at least one First Nation and one Inuit society, from visual evidence
  • A3.5- describe the importance of the environment for a few early societies, including at least one First Nation and one Inuit society, with a particular focus on how the local environment affected the ways in which people met their physical needs 
  • A3.6- identify and describe some of the major scientific and technological developments in the ancient and medieval world, including some from at least one First Nation and one Inuit society 
  • A3.7- describe how a few early societies, including at least one First Nation and one Inuit society, were governed 

ELA: Literacy Connections & Applications

  • A3.2- demonstrate an understanding of the historical contexts, contributions, lived experiences, and perspectives of a diversity of individuals and communities, including those in Canada, by exploring the concepts of identity, self, and sense of belonging in a variety of culturally responsive and relevant texts
  • A3.3- explain themes explored in First Nations, Métis, and Inuit cultures to demonstrate an understanding of the varied identities, perspectives, relationships, legacies, truths, and ways of knowing, being, and doing

ELA: Foundations of Language

  • B1.5- use appropriate word choice, including new vocabulary, varied adjectives and adverbs to elaborate, a variety of sentence types, and cohesive sentences during formal and informal communication, to support audience comprehension

Applicable KBI lessons:

1. Classifying Living Things

Unit Plan Overview

  • Literacy builder worksheet/answer guide
  • Lesson worksheet/answers
  • Video worksheet/answer guide

 

2. Life on Turtle Island

Unit Plan Overview

  • Literacy builder worksheet/answer guide
  • Lesson worksheet/answers

Curriculum-Related Themes Throughout the Year

Remembrance/Veterans/Memorial Day (November)

Curricular outcomes:

Language: 

  • Literacy Connections and Applications
    • A3.3- explain themes explored in First Nations, Metis, and Inuit cultures to demonstrate an understanding of the varied identities, perspectives, relationships, legacies, truths, and ways of knowing, being, and doing. 
  • Comprehension Strategies: 
    • C2.1- identify and explain prior knowledge from various sources, including personal experiences, that they can use to make connections and understand new texts. 
    • C2.5- describe how the ideas expressed in texts connect to their knowledges and lived experiences, the ideas in other texts, and the world around them.
    • C3.2 – make local and global inferences, using explicit and implicit evidence, to extend their understanding of various texts. 

Applicable KBI lessons:

1. Remembrance Day / Veterans Day / Armistice Day

Lesson Plan/Activity

Building Leadership Skills To Help Others (December)

Curricular outcomes:

Health: 

  • D2.5- demonstrate an understanding of how choices they make every day can have a positive impact on their mental health. 
  • D3.3- demonstrate an understanding of different strategies they can use to manage stress in situation in which they have some control, as well as to adapt to challenging situations over which they have less immediate influence. 

Language: 

  • D2.1- draft texts of various forms and genres, including narrative, persuasive, and informational texts, using a variety of media, tools, and strategies 
  • D2.3- establish a personal voice in their texts, using varies language and elements of style to express their thoughts, feelings, and opinions about a topic, and using a tone appropriate to the form and genre. 
  • D3.2 – publish and present texts they have created, using selected media and tools, and explain how each helped them communicate their intended message. 

Applicable KBI lessons:

1. Winter Break - Spreading Kindness 

Lesson Plan/Activities

  • Literacy builder worksheet/answer guide
  • Activity - Making A Difference
  • Activity - Compare and Contrast special things at this time of year
  • Activity - Recipe book
  • Activity - Shape Poem
Black History & Refugee Experiences (February)

Curricular outcomes:

Comprehension Strategies: 

  • C2.1- identify and explain prior knowledge from various sources, including personal experiences, that they can use to make connections and understand new texts. 
  • C2.5- describe how the ideas expressed in texts connect to their knowledges and lived experiences, the ideas in other texts, and the world around them.
  • C3.2 – make local and global inferences, using explicit and implicit evidence, to extend their understanding of various texts.

Science: 

  • A3.1- describe practical applications of science and technology concepts in various occupations, including skilled trades, and how these application address real world problems. 
  • A3.3- analyze contributions to science and technology from various communities. 

Social Studies: 

  • A1.3- describe some of the ways in which their daily life differs from the lives of young people from different backgrounds in a few early societies, including at least one First Nation and one Inuit society. 

Applicable KBI lessons:

1. Black History Month

 

2. Refugee Experiences

Unit Plan Overview

  • Lesson worksheet/answers
  • Inquiry activities
Celebrating Inspiring Women in STEM (March)

Curricular outcomes:

Comprehension Strategies: 

  • C2.1- identify and explain prior knowledge from various sources, including personal experiences, that they can use to make connections and understand new texts. 
  • C2.5- describe how the ideas expressed in texts connect to their knowledges and lived experiences, the ideas in other texts, and the world around them.
  • C3.2 – make local and global inferences, using explicit and implicit evidence, to extend their understanding of various texts.

Language: 

  • D2.1- draft texts of various forms and genres, including narrative, persuasive, and informational texts, using a variety of media, tools, and strategies 
  • D2.3- establish a personal voice in their texts, using varies language and elements of style to express their thoughts, feelings, and opinions about a topic, and using a tone appropriate to the form and genre.
  • D3.1 produce final texts using a variety of techniques and tools, including simple digital design and production tools, to achieve the intended effect

Science: 

  • A3.1- describe practical applications of science and technology concepts in various occupations, including skilled trades, and how these application address real world problems. 
  • A3.3- analyze contributions to science and technology from various communities.

Social Studies: 

  • A1.1- compare social organization in a few early societies, including at least one First Nation and one Inuit society. 

Applicable KBI lessons:

1. International Women's Day - Celebrating Inspiring Women in STEM

Unit Plan Overview

  • Literacy builder worksheets/answer guides
  • Inquiry activities
Communicable Illness and Preventing Pandemics - Immunization Awareness Week (April)

Curricular outcomes:

Comprehension Strategies: 

  • C2.1- identify and explain prior knowledge from various sources, including personal experiences, that they can use to make connections and understand new texts. 
  • C2.5- describe how the ideas expressed in texts connect to their knowledges and lived experiences, the ideas in other texts, and the world around them.
  • C3.2 – make local and global inferences, using explicit and implicit evidence, to extend their understanding of various texts.

Applicable KBI lessons:

1. Immunization Awareness Week


Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

 

Click here to access the Curriculum Connections showing curriculum outcomes for the different KBI learning modules/lessons and links to accompanying lesson resources.

Made by a Grade 5 teacher in Ontario. 

Kids Boost Immunity (KBI) provides educational content (lessons and support materials) developed by teachers and where needed, health experts, that is directly linked to curriculum and is available completely for free. Each lesson is paired with an online quiz that students can take on a laptop, tablet, or phone. Every time a student scores 80% or higher on a quiz, we donate life-saving vaccines to UNICEF Canada. To learn more about KBI, click here.

Click on the overarching curriculum themes below to see the curriculum outcomes that match KBI educational content.

Ways of Knowing

Curricular outcomes:

ELA: Literacy Connections & Applications

  • A2.2- demonstrate an understanding of how to navigate online environments safely, manage their privacy and personal data, and interact in a way that supports their well-being and that of others, including seeking appropriate permission
  • A2.3- gather, evaluate, and use information, considering validity, credibility, accuracy, and perspectives, to construct knowledge, create texts, and demonstrate learning
  • A2.5- demonstrate an understanding of the interrelationships between the form, message, and context of texts, the intended audience, and the purpose for production

ELA: Comprehensive Understanding

  • C3.5- identify explicit and implicit perspectives communicated in various texts, explain how these perspectives are conveyed, give some evidence of any biases the texts may contain, and suggest how such biases could influence an audience
  • C3.8- identify the critical thinking skills they used to analyze and evaluate various texts, and explain how these skills have helped them better understand the texts

ELA: Composition

  • D1.3- gather and record information and content relevant to a topic, using multiple textual sources; verify the reliability of sources, using simple criteria; and record the creator and source of all content created by others

Science STEM Skills & Connections

  • A1.1- use a scientific research process and associated skills to conduct investigations
  • A1.5- communicate their findings, using science and technology vocabulary and formats that are appropriate for specific audiences and purposes

Math: Data Literacy

  • D1.1- explain the importance of various sampling techniques for collecting a sample of data that is representative of a population
  • D1.6 - analyse different sets of data presented in various ways, including in stacked-bar graphs and in misleading graphs, by asking and answering questions about the data, challenging preconceived notions, and drawing conclusions, then make convincing arguments and informed decisions

Social Studies: Heritage & Identity

  • A2.2- gather and organize information on interactions among Indigenous peoples, among Europeans, and between Indigenous and European people in what would eventually become Canada, using a variety of primary and secondary sources that present various perspectives
  • A2.4- interpret and analyse information and evidence relevant to their investigations, using a variety of tools

Applicable KBI lessons:

1. Critical Thinking & Evaluating Information

Unit Plan Overview

  • Literacy builder worksheet/answer guide
  • Lesson worksheet/answers
  • Video worksheet/answers
  • Inquiry activities/answer guides
  • Numeracy activity/answers
Relationships

Curricular outcomes:

Social Studies: Heritage & Identity

  • A1.1- describe some of the positive and negative consequences of contact between Indigenous peoples and European explorers and settlers in what would eventually become Canada
  • A1.2- analyse aspects of contact between Indigenous peoples and European explorers and settlers in what would eventually become Canada to determine ways in which different parties benefited from each other
  • A1.3- explain some of the ways in which interactions among Indigenous peoples, among European explorers and settlers, and between Indigenous and European people in what would eventually become Canada are connected to issues in present-day Canada
  • A2.2- gather and organize information on interactions among Indigenous peoples, among Europeans, and between Indigenous and European people in what would eventually become Canada, using a variety of primary and secondary sources that present various perspectives
  • A3.3- describe the main motives for Europeans’ exploration of Indigenous lands that were eventually claimed by Canada and for the establishment of permanent European settlements
  • A3.5- describe significant aspects of the interactions between Indigenous peoples and European explorers and settlers in what would eventually become Canada
  • A3.7- describe some significant differences among Indigenous peoples and between selected Indigenous and European communities in what would eventually become Canada

Social Studies: People & Environments

  • B3.3- describe some First Nations, Métis, and Inuit governance structures that currently exist in Canada

Science: Earth & Space Systems

  • E1.3- analyse how First Nations, Métis, and Inuit communities use their knowledges and ways of knowing to conserve energy and resources

ELA: Foundations of Language

  • B2.2- demonstrate an understanding of a variety of words, acquire and use explicitly taught vocabulary in various contexts, including other subject areas, and use generalized morphological knowledge to analyze and understand new words in context

ELA- Comprehensive Understanding

  • C1.7- read, listen to, and view various forms of texts by diverse First Nations, Métis, and Inuit creators to make meaning through Indigenous Storywork about First Nations, Métis, and Inuit histories, cultures, relationships, communities, groups, nations, and lived experiences
  • C3.7- explain how texts created by First Nations, Métis, and Inuit individuals, communities, groups, or nations are influenced by historical periods, cultural experiences, and events, and how they relate to current lived experiences

ELA- Literacy Connections & Applications

  • A3.2- demonstrate an understanding of the historical contexts, contributions, lived experiences, and perspectives of a diversity of individuals and communities, including those in Canada, by exploring the concepts of identity, self, and sense of belonging in a variety of culturally responsive and relevant texts
  • A3.3- explain themes explored in First Nations, Métis, and Inuit cultures to demonstrate an understanding of the varied identities, perspectives, relationships, legacies, truths, and ways of knowing, being, and doing

Health: Social-Emotional Learning Skills

  • A1.4- apply skills that help them build relationships, develop empathy, and communicate with others as they participate in learning experiences in health and physical education, in order to support healthy relationships, a sense of belonging, and respect for diversity

Applicable KBI lessons:

1. Life on Turtle Island

Unit Plan Overview

  • Literacy builder worksheet/answer guide
  • Lesson worksheet/answers

 

2. Cooperation and Colonization

Unit Plan Overview

  • Literacy builder worksheet/answer guide
  • Lesson worksheet/answers
Governing Bodies

Curricular outcomes:

Social Studies: People & Environments

  • B3.2- describe the jurisdiction of different levels of government in Canada, as well as of some other elected bodies (i.e., federal, provincial, territorial, and municipal governments; band councils; school boards), and some of the services provided by each
  • B3.7- describe key actions taken by governments, including Indigenous governments, to solve some significant national, provincial/territorial, and/or local issues

Social Studies: Heritage & Identity

  • A3.5- describe significant aspects of the interactions between Indigenous peoples and European explorers and settlers in what would eventually become Canada

Science: STEM Skills & Connections

  • A3.2- investigate how science and technology can be used with other subject areas to address real-world problems

Science: Life Systems

  • B2.1- identify systems of the human body, and describe their basic function
  • B2.4- identify various diseases and medical disorders in humans and the organs and/or body system or systems that they affect
  • B1.1- assess effects of a variety of social and environmental factors on human health, and describe ways in which individuals can reduce the harmful effects of these factors and take advantage of those that are beneficial
  • B1.2- evaluate beneficial and harmful effects of various technologies on human health and body systems, while taking different perspectives into consideration

ELA: Foundations of Language

  • B2.2- demonstrate an understanding of a variety of words, acquire and use explicitly taught vocabulary in various contexts, including other subject areas, and use generalized morphological knowledge to analyze and understand new words in context

ELA- Literacy Connections & Applications

  • A3.2- demonstrate an understanding of the historical contexts, contributions, lived experiences, and perspectives of a diversity of individuals and communities, including those in Canada, by exploring the concepts of identity, self, and sense of belonging in a variety of culturally responsive and relevant texts

ELA: Literacy Connections & Applications

  • A2.2- demonstrate an understanding of how to navigate online environments safely, manage their privacy and personal data, and interact in a way that supports their well-being and that of others, including seeking appropriate permission
  • A2.3- gather, evaluate, and use information, considering validity, credibility, accuracy, and perspectives, to construct knowledge, create texts, and demonstrate learning

Applicable KBI lessons:

1. Canada's Three Levels of Government

  • Unit Plan Overview
  • Literacy builder worksheet/answer guide
  • Lesson worksheet/answers
  • Numeracy activity/answers

 

2. Germs, The Body's Defense System, & How Vaccines Help

Lesson Plan

  • Literacy builder worksheet/answer guide
  • Lesson worksheet/answers

 

3. The Spread of Infectious Diseases

Curriculum-Related Themes Throughout the Year

Remembrance/Veterans/Memorial Day (November)

Curricular outcomes:

  • C2.1 identify and explain prior knowledge from various sources, including personal experiences, that they can use to make connections and understand new texts 
  • C2.5 – describe how the ideas expressed in texts connect to their knowledges and lived experiences, the ideas in other texts, and the world around them 
  • C3.2 – Make local and global inferences, using explicit and implicit evidence, to extend their understanding of various texts 

Applicable KBI lessons:

1. Remembrance Day / Veterans Day / Armistice Day 

Lesson Plan/Activity

Building Leadership Skills To Help Others (December)

Curricular outcomes:

Health: 

  • D2.6 – demonstrate an understanding of their role, and the limits of their role, in helping others who may need mental health support 
  • D3.4- demonstrate an understanding of how our attitudes about mental health affect those around us and how they might contribute to or prevent creating stigma 

Language: 

  • D1.2 – generate and develop ideas about various topics, such as topics related to diversity, equity, and inclusion and to other subject areas, using a variety of strategies, and drawing on various resources, including their own lived experiences. 
  • D2.3 – establish a personal voice in their texts, using varied language and elements of style to express their thoughts, feelings, and opinions about a topic, and using a tone appropriate to the form and genre 
  • D3.1 – produce final texts using a variety of techniques and tools, including simple digital design and production tools, to achieve the intended effect 

Applicable KBI lessons:

1. Winter Break - Spreading Kindness

Lesson Plan/Activities

  • Literacy builder worksheet/answer guide
  • Activity - Making A Difference
  • Activity - Compare and Contrast special things at this time of year
  • Activity - Recipe book
  • Activity - Shape Poem
Black History & Refugee Experiences (February)

Curricular connections:

Language

  • C2.1 identify and explain prior knowledge from various sources, including personal experiences, that they can use to make connections and understand new texts 
  • C2.5 – describe how the ideas expressed in texts connect to their knowledges and lived experiences, the ideas in other texts, and the world around them 
  • C3.2 – Make local and global inferences, using explicit and implicit evidence, to extend their understanding of various texts 

Social Studies: 

  • B3.1 – describe the major rights and responsibilities associated with citizenship in Canada 
  • B3.2- describe the jurisdiction of different levels of government in Canada, as well as of some other elected bodies and some of the services provided by each

Science 

  • A3.2- investigate how science and technology can be used with other subject areas to address real-world problems 
  • A3.3 analyse contributions to science and technology from various communities

Applicable KBI lessons:

1. Black History Month

 

2. Refugee Experiences

Unit Plan Overview

  • Lesson worksheet/answers
  • Inquiry activities
Celebrating Inspiring Women in STEM (March)

Curricular outcomes:

Social Studies

  • B3.4- Describe the shared responsibility of various levels of government for providing some services and for dealing with selected social and environmental issues 
  • B3.7 – Describe key actions taken by governments, including Indigenous governments, to solve some significant national, provincial/territorial, and/or local issues 
  • B3.8 explain why different groups may have different perspectives on specific social and environmental issues 
  • B3.9 describe some different ways in which citizens can take action to address social and environmental issues 

Science 

  • A3.2- investigate how science and technology can be used with other subject areas to address real-world problems 
  • A3.3 analyse contributions to science and technology from various communities 

Language

  • C2.1 identify and explain prior knowledge from various sources, including personal experiences, that they can use to make connections and understand new texts 
  • C2.5 – describe how the ideas expressed in texts connect to their knowledges and lived experiences, the ideas in other texts, and the world around them 
  • C3.2 – Make local and global inferences, using explicit and implicit evidence, to extend their understanding of various texts 

Applicable KBI lessons:

1. International Women's Day - Celebrating Inspiring Women in STEM

Unit Plan Overview

  • Literacy builder worksheets/answer guides
  • Inquiry activities
Communicable Illness and Preventing Pandemics - Immunization Awareness Week (April)

Curricular outcomes:

Language

  • C2.1 identify and explain prior knowledge from various sources, including personal experiences, that they can use to make connections and understand new texts 
  • C2.5 – describe how the ideas expressed in texts connect to their knowledges and lived experiences, the ideas in other texts, and the world around them 
  • C3.2 – Make local and global inferences, using explicit and implicit evidence, to extend their understanding of various texts

Applicable KBI lessons:

1. Immunization Awareness Week


Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

 

Click here to access the Curriculum Connections showing curriculum outcomes for the different KBI learning modules/lessons and links to accompanying lesson resources.

Made by a Grade 6 teacher in Ontario. 

Kids Boost Immunity (KBI) provides educational content (lessons and support materials) developed by teachers and where needed, health experts, that is directly linked to curriculum and is available completely for free. Each lesson is paired with an online quiz that students can take on a laptop, tablet, or phone. Every time a student scores 80% or higher on a quiz, we donate life-saving vaccines to UNICEF Canada. To learn more about KBI, click here.

Click on the overarching curriculum themes below to see the curriculum outcomes that match KBI educational content.

Critical Thinking

Curricular outcomes:

Math 

  • E2.6- determine the surface areas of prisms and pyramids by calculating the areas of their two-dimensional faces and adding them together
  • D1.6- analyse different sets of data presented in various ways, including in histograms and broken-line graphs and in misleading graphs, by asking and answering questions about the data, challenging preconceived notions, and drawing conclusions, then make convincing arguments and informed decisions

Science: STEM Skills & Connections

  • A1.1- use a scientific research process and associated skills to conduct investigations
  • A1.2- use a scientific experimentation process and associated skills to conduct investigations
  • A1.5- communicate their findings, using science and technology vocabulary and formats that are appropriate for specific audiences and purposes

Language: Literacy Connections & Applications

  • A2.2- demonstrate an understanding of how to navigate online environments safely, manage their privacy and personal data, and interact in a way that supports their well-being and that of others, including seeking appropriate permission
  • A2.3- gather, evaluate, and use information, considering validity, credibility, accuracy, and perspectives, to construct knowledge, create texts, and demonstrate learning
  • A2.4- demonstrate an understanding of the forms, conventions, and techniques of digital and media texts, consider the impact on the audience, and apply this understanding when analyzing and creating texts
  • A2.5- demonstrate an understanding of the interrelationships between the form, message, and context of texts, the intended audience, and the purpose for production

Social Studies: Heritage & Identity

  • A2.2- gather and organize information from a variety of primary and secondary sources

Applicable KBI lessons:

1. Critical Thinking & Evaluating Information

Unit Plan Overview

  • Literacy builder worksheet/answer guide
  • Lesson worksheet/answers
  • Video worksheet/answers
  • Inquiry activities/answer guides
  • Numeracy activity/answers
Citizenship & Community

Curricular outcomes:

Language: Literacy Connections & Applications

  • A3.3- explain themes explored in First Nations, Métis, and Inuit cultures to demonstrate an understanding of the varied identities, perspectives, relationships, legacies, truths, and ways of knowing, being, and doing
  • A2.7 communicate and collaborate with various communities in a safe, respectful, responsible, and inclusive manner when using online platforms and environments, including digital and media tools, and demonstrate cultural awareness with members of the community

Language: Foundations of Language

  • B2.2- demonstrate an understanding of a variety of words, acquire and use explicitly taught vocabulary in various contexts, including other subject areas, and use generalized morphological knowledge to analyze and understand new words in context

Social Studies: Heritage & Identity 

  • A1.2- analyse some of the contributions that various First Nations, Métis, and Inuit communities and individuals have made to Canada
  • A1.4- explain how various groups and communities, including First Nations, Métis, and Inuit communities, have contributed to the goal of inclusiveness in Canada
  • A2.1- formulate questions to guide investigations into different perspectives on the historical and/or contemporary experiences of a few distinct communities, including First Nations, Métis, and/or Inuit communities, in Canada 
  • A2.2- gather and organize information from a variety of primary and secondary sources that present different perspectives on the historical and/or contemporary experience of a few communities, including First Nations, Métis, and/or Inuit communities, in Canada 
  • A2.5- evaluate evidence and draw conclusions about perspectives on the historical and/or contemporary experience of a few distinct communities, including First Nations, Métis, and/or Inuit communities, in Canada
  • A2.6- communicate the results of their inquiries, using appropriate vocabulary
  • A3.5- describe significant events or developments in the history of two or more First Nations, Métis, and/or Inuit communities in Canada and how these events affected the communities’ development and/or identities

Health Education: Social & Emotional Learning Skills (Healthy Living)

  • A1.6- apply skills that help them think critically and creatively as they participate in learning experiences in health and physical education, in order to support making connections, analysing, evaluating, problem solving, and decision making

Health Education: Healthy Living

  • D1.1- demonstrate ways of being inclusive, respectful, and accepting, and describe how this benefits everyone, including themselves

Science: STEM Skills & Connections

  • A3.3- analyse contributions to science and technology from various communities

Applicable KBI lessons:

1. Indigenous Experiences of Colonization

Unit Plan Overview

  • Literacy builder worksheet/answer guide
  • Lesson worksheet/answers
  • Inquiry activities/answer guides
Interconnections

Curricular outcomes:

Science: STEM Skills & Connections

  • A3.2- investigate how science and technology can be used with other subject areas to address real-world problems

Science: Life Systems

  • B1.2- analyse a local issue related to biodiversity while considering different perspectives; plan a course of action in response to the issue; and act on their plan
  • B2.1- describe the distinguishing characteristics of different groups of organisms, and use these characteristics to further classify these organisms using a classification system
  • B2.2- demonstrate an understanding of biodiversity as the diversity of life on Earth, including the diversity of organisms within species, among species in a community, and among communities and the habitats that support them
  • B2.5- describe interrelationships within species, between species, and between species and their natural environment, and explain how these interrelationships sustain biodiversity
  • B2.7- explain how climate change contributes to a loss of biodiversity, and describe the impact of this loss

Math: Number

  • B1.6- describe relationships and show equivalences among fractions and decimal numbers up to thousandths, using appropriate tools and drawings, in various contexts

Social Studies: Peoples & Environments

  • B1.1- explain why Canada participates in specific international accords and organizations
  • B1.2- analyse responses of Canadian governments, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and individual citizens to an economic, environmental, political, and/or social issue of international significance
  • B1.3- explain why some environmental issues are of international importance and require the participation of other regions of the world, along with that of Canada, if they are to be effectively addressed
  • B2.3- analyse and construct different types of maps, both print and digital, as part of their investigations into global issues, their impact, and responses to them
  • B2.5- evaluate evidence and draw conclusions about global issues of political, social, economic, and/or environmental importance, their impact on the global community, and responses to the issues
  • B3.1- identify some of the major ways in which the Canadian government interacts with other nations of the world
  • B3.2- describe Canada’s participation in different international accords, organizations, and/or programs
  • B3.3- describe several groups or organizations through which Canada and Canadians are involved in global issues
  • B3.4- describe the responses of the Canadian government and some NGOs to different disasters and emergencies around the world
  • B3.6- identify some significant political, social, and economic interactions between Canada and other regions of the world, and describe some ways in which they affect these regions

Health Education: Healthy Living

  • D2.6- make informed decisions that demonstrate respect for themselves and others

Applicable KBI lessons:

1. Diversity of Living Things

Unit Plan Overview

  • Literacy builder worksheet/answer guide
  • Lesson worksheet/answers
  • Video worksheet/answers
  • Numeracy activity/answers

 

2. Environment & Climate Change

Unit Plan Overview

  • Literacy builder worksheet/answer guide
  • Lesson worksheet/answers
  • Video worksheet/answers
  • Inquiry activities/answer guides
  • Numeracy activity/answers

 

3. Canada's Interactions with the Global Community

Unit Plan Overview

  • Literacy builder worksheet/answer guide
  • Lesson worksheet/answers
  • Video worksheet/answers
  • Inquiry activities/answer guides
  • Numeracy activity/answers

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

 

Click here to access the Curriculum Connections showing curriculum outcomes for the different KBI learning modules/lessons and links to accompanying lesson resources.

Made by a Grade 7 teacher in Ontario. 

Kids Boost Immunity (KBI) provides educational content (lessons and support materials) developed by teachers and where needed, health experts, that is directly linked to curriculum and is available completely for free. Each lesson is paired with an online quiz that students can take on a laptop, tablet, or phone. Every time a student scores 80% or higher on a quiz, we donate life-saving vaccines to UNICEF Canada. To learn more about KBI, click here.

Click on the overarching curriculum themes below to see the curriculum outcomes that match KBI educational content.

Health

Curricular outcomes:

Health: Social-Emotional Learning Skills

  • A1.6- apply skills that help them think critically and creatively as they participate in learning experiences in health and physical education, in order to support making connections, analysing, evaluating, problem solving, and decision making
  • A1.2- apply skills that help them to recognize sources of stress and to cope with challenges, including help-seeking behaviours, as they participate in learning experiences in health and physical education, in order to support the development of personal resilience

Health: Healthy Living

  • D1.1- describe benefits and dangers, for themselves and others, that are associated with the use of computers and other digital technologies
  • D1.4- identify sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections (STBBIs), and describe their symptoms

Applicable KBI lessons:

1. The Spread of Infectious Diseases

Science

Curricular outcomes:

Science- STEM Skills & Connections

  • A3.2- investigate how science and technology can be used with other subject areas to address real-world problems
  • A3.3- analyse contributions to science and technology from various communities

Science- Life Systems

  • B1.1- assess the impact of various technologies on the environment
  • B1.2- assess the effectiveness of various ways of mitigating the negative and enhancing the positive impact of human activities on the environment
  • B2.1-explain that an ecosystem is a network of interactions among living organisms and their environment
  • B2.2- identify biotic and abiotic components in an ecosystem, and describe the interactions between them
  • B2.3-describe roles and relationships between producers, consumers, and decomposers within an ecosystem

Applicable KBI lessons:

1. Diversity of Living Things

Unit Plan Overview

  • Literacy builder worksheet/answer guide
  • Lesson worksheet/answers
  • Numeracy activity/answers

 

2. Environment & Climate Change

Unit Plan Overview

  • Literacy builder worksheet/answer guide
  • Lesson worksheet/answers
  • Video worksheet/answers
  • Inquiry activities/answer guides
  • Numeracy activity/answers
History

Curricular outcomes:

Social Studies: New France & BNA

  • A1.2- analyse some of the main challenges facing various individuals, groups, and/or communities, including First Nations, Métis, and Inuit individuals and/or communities, in Canada between 1713 and 1800 and ways in which people responded to those challenges
  • A1.3-analyse the displacement experienced by various groups and communities, including First Nations, Métis, and Inuit communities, who were living in or who came to Canada between 1713 and 1800
  • A2.2- gather and organize information and evidence about perspectives of different groups and communities, including First Nations, Métis, and/or Inuit communities, on some significant events, developments, and/or issues related to the shift in power in colonial Canada from France to Britain, using a variety of primary sources
  • A2.6- evaluate evidence and draw conclusions about perspectives of different groups and communities, including First Nation, Métis, and/or Inuit communities, on some significant events, developments, or issues related to the shift in power in colonial Canada from France to Britain
  • A2.7- communicate the results of their inquiries using appropriate vocabulary
  • A3.2- identify a few key treaties of relevance to Indigenous people during this period, including wampum belts exchanged, and explain the significance of some of these agreements for different people and communities in Canada
  • A3.4- identify key social and economic changes that occurred in and/or affected Canada during this period , and explain the impact of some of these changes on various individuals, groups, and/or communities, including First Nations, Métis, and/or Inuit individuals and communities
  • A3.7- describe significant interactions between various individuals, groups, and institutions in Canada during this period

Social Studies: Canada 1800-1850

  • B1.1- analyse social and political values and significant aspects of life for some different groups and communities, including First Nations, Métis, and Inuit communities, in Canada between 1800 and 1850
  • B1.2- analyse some of the challenges facing individuals, groups, and/or communities, including First Nations, Métis, and Inuit individuals and/or communities, in Canada between 1800 and 1850
  • B1.3- analyse the displacement experienced by various groups and communities, including Indigenous communities, who were living in or who came to Canada between 1800 and 1850
  • B2.7- communicate the results of their inquiries using appropriate vocabulary

Applicable KBI lessons:

1. Life on Turtle Island

Unit Plan Overview

  • Literacy builder worksheet/answer guide
  • Lesson worksheet/answers
English Language Arts (ELA)

Curricular outcomes:

Language: Literacy Connections & Applications

  • A2.2- demonstrate an understanding of how to navigate online environments safely, manage their privacy, personal data, and security, and interact in a way that supports their well-being and that of others, including seeking appropriate permission
  • A2.3- conduct research, considering accuracy, credibility, and perspectives, with a focus on misinformation, disinformation, and curated information, to construct knowledge, create texts, and demonstrate learning, while respecting legal and ethical considerations
  • A2.4- evaluate the use of the various forms, conventions, and techniques of digital and media texts, consider the impact on the audience, and apply this understanding when analyzing and creating texts
  • A2.5- demonstrate an understanding of the interrelationships between the form, message, and context of texts, the intended and unintended audience, and the purpose for production

Language: Comprehension

  • C1.2- analyze a variety of text forms and genres, including cultural text forms, and explain how their characteristics help communicate meaning
  • C1.3- analyze text patterns, such as cause and effect in an expository text, and text features, such as a bibliography and accessible fonts, associated with various text forms, including cultural texts, and explain how they help readers, listeners, and viewers understand the meaning
  • C1.5- identify various elements of style in texts, including voice, word choice, word patterns, and sentence structure, and analyze how each element helps create meaning and is appropriate for the text form and genre
  • C2.2- identify a variety of purposes for engaging with texts, select texts from diverse creators that are suitable for the purposes, and explain why the selections are appropriate
  • C2.4- select suitable strategies, such as visualizing, reading ahead, asking questions, and consulting references and other texts or sources of information, to monitor and confirm their understanding of various texts and solve comprehension problems
  • C3.5- explain explicit and implicit perspectives communicated in various texts, including narrative texts, provide any evidence that could suggest bias in these perspectives, and suggest ways to avoid any such bias
  • C3.8- compare the critical thinking skills they used when analyzing and evaluating various texts, identify the skills that best supported their understanding, and explain why they were effective

Applicable KBI lessons:

1. Critical Thinking & Evaluating Information

Unit Plan Overview

  • Literacy builder worksheet/answer guide
  • Lesson worksheet/answers
  • Video worksheet/answers
  • Inquiry activities/answer guides
  • Numeracy activity/answers

 

2. Navigating the World of Online (Mis)Information

Unit Plan Overview

  • Literacy builder worksheet/answer guide
  • Inquiry activities/answer guides

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

 

Click here to access the Curriculum Connections showing curriculum outcomes for the different KBI learning modules/lessons and links to accompanying lesson resources.

Made by a Grade 8 teacher in Ontario. 

Kids Boost Immunity (KBI) provides educational content (lessons and support materials) developed by teachers and where needed, health experts, that is directly linked to curriculum and is available completely for free. Each lesson is paired with an online quiz that students can take on a laptop, tablet, or phone. Every time a student scores 80% or higher on a quiz, we donate life-saving vaccines to UNICEF Canada. To learn more about KBI, click here.

Click on the overarching curriculum themes below to see the curriculum outcomes that match KBI educational content.

Science

Curricular outcomes:

Science: STEM Skills & Connections

  • A3.2- investigate how science and technology can be used with other subject areas to address real-world problems
  • A3.3- analyse contributions to science and technology from various communities

Science: Life Science

  • B2.1- demonstrate an understanding of cells, using cell theory
  • B2.2-identify organelles and other cell components, including the nucleus, cell membrane, cell wall, chloroplasts, vacuole, mitochondria, and cytoplasm, and explain their basic functions
  • B2.5- describe various unicellular and multicellular organisms, and compare ways in which these two types of organisms meet their basic needs

Science: Earth & Space Systems

  • E2.1- identify the states of water on Earth’s surface, their distribution, relative amounts, and circulation, and the conditions under which they exist
  • E2.3- explain how human activity and natural phenomena cause changes in the water table
  • E2.4- identify factors, including climate change, that have contributed to the melting of glaciers and polar ice-caps, and describe the effects of this phenomenon on local and global water systems
  • E2.6-describe various indicators of water quality, and explain the impact of human activity on those indicators
  • E1.1- assess the social and environmental impact of the scarcity of fresh water, and propose a plan of action to help address fresh water sustainability issues

Applicable KBI lessons:

1. Diversity of Living Things

Unit Plan Overview

  • Literacy builder worksheet/answer guide
  • Lesson worksheet/answers

 

2. Environment & Climate Change

Unit Plan Overview

  • Literacy builder worksheet/answer guide
  • Lesson worksheet/answers
  • Video worksheet/answers
  • Inquiry activities/answer guides
  • Numeracy activity/answers
History

Curricular outcomes:

History: Canada 1850-1890

  • A1.2- assess the impact that limitations with respect to legal status, rights, and privileges had on First Nations, Métis, and Inuit individuals and/or communities in Canada between 1850 and 1890
  • A2.2- gather and organize information and evidence about perspectives of different groups and communities, including First Nations, Métis, and/or Inuit communities, on some significant events, developments, and/or issues that affected Canada and/or people in Canada during this period, using a variety of primary sources and secondary sources
  • A2.6- evaluate evidence and draw conclusions about perspectives of different groups and communities, including First Nations, Métis, and/or Inuit communities, on some significant events, developments, and/or issues in Canada during this period
  • A3.2- describe key political and legal developments that affected First Nations, Métis, and Inuit people during this period, including treaties, government policies, and the Indian Act and other legislation
  • A3.3- identify some key factors that contributed to the establishment of the residential school system

History: Canada 1890-1914

  • B1.2- analyse some ways in which challenges affected First Nations, Métis, and Inuit individuals, families, and communities during this period, with specific reference to treaties, the Indian Act, the reserve system, and the residential school system
  • B3.1-  identify factors contributing to some key issues, events, and/or developments that specifically affected First Nations, Métis, and Inuit in Canada between 1890 and 1914
  • B3.3- identify key political and legal changes that occurred in and/or affected Canada during this period, and explain the impact of some of these changes on various individuals, groups, and/or communities, including First Nations, Métis, and Inuit individuals and/or communities
  • B3.5- describe significant examples of cooperation and conflict in Canada during this period

Applicable KBI lessons:

1. Indigenous History on Turtle Island

Lesson Plan

  • Lesson worksheet
English Language Arts (ELA)

Curricular outcomes:

Language: Literacy Connections & Applications

  • A2.2- demonstrate an understanding of how to navigate online environments safely, manage their privacy, personal data, and security, and interact in a way that supports their well-being and that of others, including seeking appropriate permission
  • A2.3- conduct research, considering accuracy, credibility, and perspectives, with a focus on misinformation, disinformation, and curated information, to construct knowledge, create texts, and demonstrate learning, while respecting legal and ethical considerations
  • A2.4- evaluate the use of the various forms, conventions, and techniques of digital and media texts, consider the impact on the audience, and apply this understanding when analyzing and creating texts
  • A2.5- demonstrate an understanding of the interrelationships between the form, message, and context of texts, the intended and unintended audience, and the purpose for production

Language: Comprehension

  • C1.2- analyze a variety of text forms and genres, including cultural text forms, and explain how their characteristics help communicate meaning
  • C1.3- analyze text patterns, such as cause and effect in an expository text, and text features, such as a bibliography and accessible fonts, associated with various text forms, including cultural texts, and explain how they help readers, listeners, and viewers understand the meaning
  • C1.5- identify various elements of style in texts, including voice, word choice, word patterns, and sentence structure, and analyze how each element helps create meaning and is appropriate for the text form and genre
  • C2.2- identify a variety of purposes for engaging with texts, select texts from diverse creators that are suitable for the purposes, and explain why the selections are appropriate
  • C2.4- select suitable strategies, such as visualizing, reading ahead, asking questions, and consulting references and other texts or sources of information, to monitor and confirm their understanding of various texts and solve comprehension problems
  • C3.5- explain explicit and implicit perspectives communicated in various texts, including narrative texts, provide any evidence that could suggest bias in these perspectives, and suggest ways to avoid any such bias
  • C3.8- compare the critical thinking skills they used when analyzing and evaluating various texts, identify the skills that best supported their understanding, and explain why they were effective

Applicable KBI lessons:

1. Critical Thinking & Evaluating Information

Unit Plan Overview

  • Literacy builder worksheet/answer guide
  • Lesson worksheet/answers
  • Video worksheet/answers
  • Inquiry activities/answer guides
  • Numeracy activity/answers

 

2. Navigating the World of Online (Mis)Information

Unit Plan Overview

  • Inquiry activities
Geography

Curricular outcomes:

Geography: Global Inequalities

  • B1.1- analyse some interrelationships among factors that can contribute to quality of life 
  • B1.2- analyse how various factors have affected the economies of specific developed and developing countries around the world
  • B1.3- assess the effectiveness of various programs and policies aimed at improving the quality of life in various countries
  • B1.4- assess the effectiveness of media in improving the quality of life in some countries/regions around the world
  • B2.5- evaluate evidence and draw conclusions about issues related to global development and quality of life
  • B3.1- identify and describe the significance of several indicators that are commonly used to measure quality of life on a global scale
  • B3.5- identify various groups and organizations that work to improve quality of life
  • B3.8- identify and describe various factors that can contribute to economic development

Applicable KBI lessons:

1. Global Inequality

Unit Plan Overview

  • Lesson worksheet/answers
  • Video worksheet/answers
  • Inquiry activities/answer guides

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

]
 

Click here to access the Curriculum Connections showing curriculum outcomes for the different KBI learning modules/lessons and links to accompanying lesson resources.

Made by a Grade 9 teacher in Ontario. 

Kids Boost Immunity (KBI) provides educational content (lessons and support materials) developed by teachers and where needed, health experts, that is directly linked to curriculum and is available completely for free. Each lesson is paired with an online quiz that students can take on a laptop, tablet, or phone. Every time a student scores 80% or higher on a quiz, we donate life-saving vaccines to UNICEF Canada. To learn more about KBI, click here.

Click on the overarching curriculum themes below to see the curriculum outcomes that match KBI educational content.

Science

Curricular outcomes:

Science: STEM Skills & Connections

  • A2.3- analyse how the development and application of science is economically, culturally, and socially contextualized, by investigating real-world issues
  • A2.4- apply scientific literacy skills when investigating social and environmental issues that have personal, local, and/or global impacts

Science: Biology

  • B1.1- assess impacts of climate change on the sustainability of local and global ecosystems, describe local or global initiatives for combatting climate change, and identify solutions to address some of the impacts
  • B1.2- assess impacts of climate change on communities in Canada, including First Nations, Métis, and Inuit communities
  • B2.1- investigate interactions between the biosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, and atmosphere, and explain why these interactions are important for ecosystem sustainability
  • B2.4- investigate factors and processes, including biodiversity, air and water quality, soil health, and succession, and explain how they contribute to ecosystem sustainability
  • B2.6- identify and use various indicators of climate change to describe the impacts of climate change on local and global ecosystems, and analyse how human activities contribute to climate change

Applicable KBI lessons:

1. Environment & Climate Change

Unit Plan Overview

  • Literacy builder worksheet/answer guide
  • Lesson worksheet/answers
  • Video worksheet/answers
  • Inquiry activities/answer guides
  • Numeracy activity/answers
Issues in Canadian Geography

Curricular outcomes:

Geography: Changing Populations

  • D1.1- analyse the impact of selected population trends on people living in Canadian communities
  • D1.2- identify global demographic disparities that are of concern to people living in Canada, and assess the roles of individuals, organizations, and governments in Canada in addressing them
  • D2.1- identify factors that influence where immigrants settle in Canada, and assess the opportunities and challenges presented by immigration and cultural diversity in Canada
  • D2.3- analyse social, political, and economic impacts of Canada’s immigration and refugee policies

Applicable KBI lessons:

1. Refugee Experiences

Unit Plan Overview

  • Literacy builder worksheet/answer guide
  • Lesson worksheet/answers
English Language Arts (ELA)

Curricular outcomes:

Language: Literacy Connections & Applications

  • A2.2- demonstrate an understanding of how to navigate online environments safely, manage their privacy, personal data, and security, and interact in a way that supports their well-being and that of others, including seeking appropriate permission
  • A2.3- conduct research, considering accuracy, credibility, and perspectives, with a focus on misinformation, disinformation, and curated information, to construct knowledge, create texts, and demonstrate learning, while respecting legal and ethical considerations
  • A2.4- evaluate the use of the various forms, conventions, and techniques of digital and media texts, consider the impact on the audience, and apply this understanding when analyzing and creating texts
  • A2.5- demonstrate an understanding of the interrelationships between the form, message, and context of texts, the intended and unintended audience, and the purpose for production

Language: Comprehension

  • C1.2- analyze a variety of text forms and genres, including cultural text forms, and explain how their characteristics help communicate meaning
  • C1.3- analyze text patterns, such as cause and effect in an expository text, and text features, such as a bibliography and accessible fonts, associated with various text forms, including cultural texts, and explain how they help readers, listeners, and viewers understand the meaning
  • C1.5- identify various elements of style in texts, including voice, word choice, word patterns, and sentence structure, and analyze how each element helps create meaning and is appropriate for the text form and genre
  • C2.2- identify a variety of purposes for engaging with texts, select texts from diverse creators that are suitable for the purposes, and explain why the selections are appropriate
  • C2.4- select suitable strategies, such as visualizing, reading ahead, asking questions, and consulting references and other texts or sources of information, to monitor and confirm their understanding of various texts and solve comprehension problems
  • C3.5- explain explicit and implicit perspectives communicated in various texts, including narrative texts, provide any evidence that could suggest bias in these perspectives, and suggest ways to avoid any such bias
  • C3.8- compare the critical thinking skills they used when analyzing and evaluating various texts, identify the skills that best supported their understanding, and explain why they were effective

Applicable KBI lessons:

1. Critical Thinking & Evaluating Information

Unit Plan Overview

  • Literacy builder worksheet/answer guide
  • Lesson worksheet/answers
  • Video worksheet/answers
  • Inquiry activities/answer guides
  • Numeracy activity/answers

 

2. Navigating the World of Online (Mis)Information

Unit Plan Overview

  • Inquiry activities

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Ontario curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Science

A. Scientific Investigation Skills and Career Exploration

  • A1.1 formulate scientific questions about observed relationships, ideas, problems, and/or issues, make predictions, and/or formulate hypotheses to focus inquiries or research
  • A1.3 identify and locate print, electronic, and human sources that are relevant to research questions
  • A1.7 select, organize, and record relevant information on research topics from various sources, including electronic, print, and/or human sources (e.g., websites for public health organizations, federal and provincial government publications, reference books, personal interviews), using recommended formats and an accepted form of academic documentation
  • A1.9 analyse the information gathered from research sources for reliability and bias
  • A2.1 identify and describe a variety of careers related to the fields of science under study (e.g., meteorologist, medical illustrator, geochemist, optical physicist) and the education and training necessary for these careers

B. Biology: Tissues, Organs, and Systems of Living Things

  • B1.3 describe public health strategies related to systems biology (e.g., cancer screening and prevention programs; vaccines against the human papillomavirus [HPV] and measles, mumps, and rubella [MMR]; AIDS education), and assess their impact on society [AI, C].
    • Sample issue: Early-childhood vaccination programs have greatly reduced the incidence of certain diseases and the social and medical costs associated with them. Influenced by controversial studies arguing that there may be health risks associated with such vaccines, some parents have chosen not to vaccinate their children, which could lead to a resurgence of these potentially deadly diseases.
  • B2.1 use appropriate terminology related to cells, tissues, organs, and systems of living things, including, but not limited to: absorption, anaphase, capillaries, concentration, differentiation, diffusion, meristematic, mesophyll, phloem, prophase, red blood cells, regeneration, stomate, and xylem [C]
  • B2.7 use a research process to investigate a disease or abnormality related to tissues, organs, or systems of humans or plants (e.g., heart disease, tobacco mosaic virus, wheat rust) [IP, PR, C]
  • B3.4 explain the primary functions of a variety of systems in animals (e.g., the circulatory system transports materials through the organism; the respiratory system supplies oxygen to and removes carbon dioxide from the body)
  • B3.5 explain the interaction of different systems within an organism (e.g., the respiratory system brings oxygen into the body, and the circulatory system transports the oxygen to cells) and why such interactions are necessary for the organism’s survival

Civics and Citizenship

  • B. Civic Awareness
    • B1.4 communicate their own position on some issues of civic importance at the local, national, and/or global level (e.g., equitable availability of extracurricular activities in schools, a local land-use conflict, poverty or violence in the local community, electoral reform, the debate over Sharia law in Ontario, the level of Canada’s contribution to international development assistance, food security, Aboriginal land rights), explaining how their position is influenced by their beliefs/values
    • B2.2 explain, with reference to issues of civic importance, the roles and responsibilities of different levels of government in Canada (e.g., federal, provincial and territorial, municipal, Indigenous governments) and of key figures at each level
    • B2.3 describe, with reference to both the federal and provincial governments, the functions of the three branches of government in Canada (i.e., executive, legislative, judicial) and the roles/responsibilities of key positions within governments (e.g., the governor general, a lieutenant governor, the prime minister, a premier, cabinet ministers, a leader of the opposition, a speaker, the chief justice of the Supreme Court of Canada), and explain how the branches help ensure political and social stability in Canada
    • B2.4 explain, with reference to issues of civic importance, how various groups and institutions (e.g., lobby groups, unions, the media, NGOs, international organizations) can influence government policy
    • B3.5 identify examples of human rights violations around the world (e.g., hate crimes, torture, genocide, political imprisonment, recruitment of child soldiers, gender-based violence and discrimination), and assess the effectiveness of responses to such violations
  • C. Civic Engagement in Action
    • C1.2 describe a variety of ways in which they could make a civic contribution at the local, national, and/or global level
    • C1.3 explain how various actions can contribute to the common good at the local, national, and/ or global level

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Ontario curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Biology

A1. Scientific Investigation Skills

  • A1.1 formulate relevant scientific questions about observed relationships, ideas, problems, or issues, make informed predictions, and/or formulate educated hypotheses to focus inquiries or research
  • A1.3 identify and locate a variety of print and electronic sources that enable them to address research topics fully and appropriately
  • A1.5 conduct inquiries, controlling relevant variables, adapting or extending procedures as required, and using appropriate materials and equipment safely, accurately, and effectively, to collect observations and data
  • A1.7 select, organize, and record relevant information on research topics from a variety of appropriate sources, including electronic, print, and/or human sources, using suitable formats and an accepted form of academic documentation
  • A1.9 analyse the information gathered from research sources for logic, accuracy, reliability, adequacy, and bias
  • A2.1 identify and describe a variety of careers related to the fields of science under study (e.g., zoologist, botanist, geneticist, ecologist, pharmacologist, farmer, forester, horticulturalist) and the education and training necessary for these careers

B. Diversity of Living Things

  • B2.1 use appropriate terminology related to biodiversity, including, but not limited to: genetic diversity, species diversity, structural diversity, protists, bacteria, fungi, binomial nomenclature, and morphology [C]
  • B2.2 classify, and draw biological diagrams of, representative organisms from each of the kingdoms according to their unifying and distinguishing anatomical and physiological characteristics (e.g., vertebrate or invertebrate organisms, vascular or nonvascular plants) [PR, AI, C]
  • B2.4 create and apply a dichotomous key to identify and classify organisms from each of the kingdoms [PR, AI, C]
  • B3.1 explain the fundamental principles of taxonomy and phylogeny by defining concepts of taxonomic rank and relationship, such as genus, species, and taxon
  • B3.2 compare and contrast the structure and function of different types of prokaryotes, eukaryotes, and viruses (e.g., compare and contrast genetic material, metabolism, organelles, and other cell parts)
  • B3.3 describe unifying and distinguishing anatomical and physiological characteristics (e.g., types of reproduction, habitat, general physical structure) of representative organisms from each of the kingdoms
  • B3.4 explain key structural and functional changes in organisms as they have evolved over time (e.g., the evolution of eukaryotes from prokaryotes, of plants from unicellular organisms)

Science 

  • A1.1 formulate relevant scientific questions about observed relationships, ideas, problems, or issues, make informed predictions, and/or formulate educated hypotheses to focus inquiries or research
  • A1.3 identify and locate a variety of print and electronic sources that enable them to address research topics fully and appropriately
  • A1.5 conduct inquiries, controlling relevant variables, adapting or extending procedures as required, and using appropriate materials and equipment safely, accurately, and effectively, to collect observations and data
  • A1.6 compile accurate data from laboratory and other sources, and organize and record the data, using appropriate formats, including tables, flow charts, graphs, and/or diagrams
  • A1.7 select, organize, and record relevant information on research topics from a variety of appropriate sources, including electronic, print, and/or human sources, using suitable formats and an accepted form of academic documentation
  • A1.9 analyse the information gathered from research sources for logic, accuracy, reliability, adequacy, and bias
  • A2.1 identify and describe a variety of careers related to the fields of science under study (e.g., nuclear medicine technician, nurse practitioner, hematologist, dietitian, geneticist) and the education and training necessary for these careers

C. Microbiology

  • C1.2 analyse ethical issues related to the use of microorganisms in biotechnology (e.g., with respect to the use of bacterial insecticides, the patenting of modified microorganisms) [AI, C]

The Individual and the Economy

C4. Economic Inequality

  • C4.1 explain how various factors contribute to income inequality
  • C4.2 explain how governments, firms, and non-governmental organizations respond to economic inequalities

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Ontario curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Science (University Prep)

C. Pathogens and Disease

  • C1.1 analyse, on the basis of research, the impact, both positive and negative, of scientific and technological advances intended to prevent the spread of illness and disease [IP, PR, AI, C]
  • C1.2 evaluate the impact of individual choices (e.g., with respect to vaccination, the proper use of antibiotics or mosquito repellent) on the control of pathogens and the prevention of disease [AI, C]
  • C2.1 use appropriate terminology related to pathogens and diseases, including, but not limited to: parasite, epidemiology, pathogenesis, and vector [C]
  • C2.2 analyse, on the basis of inquiry, the effects of various treatments on pathogenesis (e.g., the effect of mouthwash or penicillin on the growth of bacteria) [PR, AI]
  • C2.3 analyse, using prepared slides or computer simulations, the characteristics, properties, and virulence of various bacteria [PR, AI]
  • C3.2 describe the mode of transmission of various diseases, including those that are insect-borne (e.g., malaria, encephalitis), airborne (e.g., influenza, tuberculosis), water-borne (e.g., cholera, poliomyelitis), sexually transmitted (e.g., HIV/AIDS), and food-borne (e.g., mad cow disease, trichinosis, salmonella)
  • C3.3 explain how the human immune response acts as a natural defence against infection
  • C3.4 describe the role of vaccines, antibiotics, antiretrovirals, and other drug therapies and antiseptics in the control of pathogenesis
  • C3.5 describe non-medical ways to protect oneself from contracting pathogenic disease in a variety of situations (e.g., aseptic techniques such as wearing sterile gloves; proper personal hygiene such as frequent and thorough hand washing; the use of insect repellent)
  • C3.6 describe some of the means used by international non-governmental organizations (e.g., Médecins sans Frontières, Oxfam, Ryan’s Well Foundation, UN agencies, the Stephen Lewis Foundation) to control the spread of disease (e.g., distribution of vaccines, medication, malaria nets; installing wells so people have access to clean water; public education on strategies for transmission prevention)
  • C3.7 describe aseptic techniques used in the workplace, and explain their importance in preventing the spread of pathogens (e.g., cooking meat to a safe temperature and refrigerating leftovers quickly to avoid growth of bacteria in restaurant food; frequent hand sanitizing and use of sterile gloves in hospitals to prevent the spread of pathogens to vulnerable populations)

E. Science and Public Health Issues

  • E1.1 assess the impact of scientific research and technological advances on public health around the world (e.g., widespread immunization for diseases such as polio, telemedicine for people in remote areas, new drug therapies to combat disease) [AI, C]
  • E1.2 assess, on the basis of research, the effectiveness of a municipal, provincial, or federal government initiative intended to protect the public health of Canadians (e.g., immunization programs, smoking bans, Health Canada advisories) [IP, PR, AI, C]
  • E2.2 analyse and interpret, using a case study or research data, scientific evidence regarding the effectiveness of a public health program intended to reduce disease transmission (e.g., distribution of bed nets to fight malaria; safe injection sites for intravenous drug users; programs to encourage hand washing in hospitals to stop the spread of C. difficile) [AI, C]
  • E2.3 use a research process to investigate public health strategies developed to combat a potential pandemic (e.g., SARS, C. difficile, avian flu) [IP, PR]
  • E2.4 use a research process to locate a media report on a public health issue (e.g., the handling of SARS, the banning of bisphenol-A in plastic bottles), summarize its arguments, and assess them from a scientific perspective [IP, PR, AI, C]
  • E3.1 describe the characteristics according to which a pandemic is classified (e.g., the strain of a virus, its mode of transmission)
  • E3.2 explain how pandemics have affected humanity throughout history (e.g., the bubonic plague of 1347–1352 in Europe, the cholera pandemic of 1817–1823 in Asia, the global Spanish influenza pandemic of 1918–1920, the contemporary AIDS pandemic)
  • E3.3 explain the impact of various threats to public health, including infectious diseases (e.g., hepatitis, HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria, sexually transmitted diseases), chronic diseases (e.g., cardiovascular disease, diabetes, asthma), and environmental factors (e.g., climate change, air pollution, chemical pollutants, radiation)
  • E3.4 explain a variety of social factors that can promote the rapid spread of infectious diseases (e.g., global population growth, international travel, poor sanitation, lack of clean drinking water)
  • E3.5 describe public health measures, including legislation, that are used for the protection of the public (e.g., quarantines, vaccinations, water chlorination, regulations on what items travellers can bring into a country)
  • E3.6 explain why some populations are particularly susceptible to specific health problems (e.g., the risk of diabetes among First Nations populations; the risk of thalassemia among Mediterranean populations; the risk of pneumonia and tuberculosis among people with HIV/AIDS)

Science (Workplace Prep)

D. Disease and its Prevention

  • D1.1 evaluate the effectiveness of a public policy measure or technological advance intended to control the spread of disease (e.g., mandatory immunization, screening for tuberculosis, quarantine) [AI, C]
  • D1.2 evaluate the impact, current and/or potential, of an individual’s choice not to participate in a public health strategy intended to reduce the spread of disease (e.g., a hospital worker who does not follow recommendations regarding hand washing; a worker in a retirement home who does not get a flu shot) [AI, C]
  • D1.3 analyse, on the basis of research, the advantages and disadvantages of selected technologies used to try to control disease (e.g., the effectiveness of pharmaceuticals at combating disease; the side effects of a variety of drugs) [IP, PR, AI, C]
  • D2.1 use appropriate terminology related to the prevention of disease, including, but not limited to: communicable, non-communicable, microorganism, pathogen, disease, epidemiology, vector, immunization record, quarantine, pandemic, vaccine, antiseptic, sterilization, disinfection, and pasteurization [C]
  • D2.3 investigate the effects of various drug therapies (e.g., different antibiotic discs) on the growth of bacteria [PR, AI]
  • D3.1 describe modes of transmission of some communicable diseases, including those that are insect-borne (e.g., malaria, encephalitis), airborne (e.g., influenza, tuberculosis), waterborne (e.g., cholera, poliomyelitis), sexually transmitted (e.g., HIV/AIDS), and food-borne (e.g., mad cow disease, trichinosis, salmonella)
  • D3.2 identify the causes and symptoms of various diseases (e.g., AIDS, influenza, salmonella, West Nile virus), and describe measures intended to prevent their spread
  • D3.3 describe the reasons for immunization against specific diseases, the function of records of immunization in Ontario, and the importance of maintaining a personal immunization schedule
  • D3.4 describe the use of vaccines, antibiotics, antiseptics, and other medical measures, both conventional and alternative, intended to control disease
  • D3.5 explain the differences between bacteria and viruses in terms of their size, structure, and reproduction, and the methods used to control their spread

Biology

A1. Scientific Investigation Skills

  • A1.1 formulate relevant scientific questions about observed relationships, ideas, problems, or issues, make informed predictions, and/or formulate educated hypotheses to focus inquiries or research
  • A1.3 identify and locate a variety of print and electronic sources that enable them to address research topics fully and appropriately
  • A1.6 compile accurate data from laboratory and other sources, and organize and record the data, using appropriate formats, including tables, flow charts, graphs, and/or diagrams
  • A1.7 select, organize, and record relevant information on research topics from a variety of appropriate sources, including electronic, print, and/or human sources, using suitable formats and an accepted form of academic documentation
  • A1.9 analyse the information gathered from research sources for logic, accuracy, reliability, adequacy, and bias
  • A2.1 identify and describe a variety of careers related to the fields of science under study (e.g., scientific journalist, fisheries and wildlife officer, physician, infectious disease researcher, geneticist) and the education and training necessary for these careers

C. Diversity of Living Things

Evolution is the process of biological change over time based on the relationships between species and their environments. The theory of evolution is a scientific explanation based on a large accumulation of evidence.

  • C1. Analyse the economic and environmental advantages and disadvantages of an artificial selection technology, and evaluate the impact of environmental changes on natural selection and endangered species;
  • C2. Investigate evolutionary processes, and analyse scientific evidence that supports the theory of evolution;
  • C3. Demonstrate an understanding of the theory of evolution, the evidence that supports it, and some of the mechanisms by which it occurs.

E. Homeostasis

  • E2.1 use appropriate terminology related to homeostasis, including, but not limited to: insulin, testosterone, estrogen, nephron, dialysis, pituitary, synapse, and acetylcholine [C]
  • E2.2 plan and construct a model to illustrate the essential components of the homeostatic process (e.g., create a flow chart that illustrates representative feedback mechanisms in living things) [IP, AI, C]
  • E2.3 plan and conduct an investigation to study a feedback system (e.g., stimulus response loop) [IP, PR, AI]
  • E3.1 describe the anatomy and physiology of the endocrine, excretory, and nervous systems, and explain how these systems interact to maintain homeostasis
  • E3.2 explain how reproductive hormones act in human feedback mechanisms to maintain homeostasis (e.g., the actions of male and female reproductive hormones on their respective body systems)
  • E3.3 describe the homeostatic processes involved in maintaining water, ionic, thermal, and acid–base equilibrium, and explain how these processes help body systems respond to both a change in environment and the effects of medical treatments (e.g., the role of feedback mechanisms in water balance or thermoregulation; how the buffering system of blood maintains the body’s pH balance; the effect of medical treatments on the endocrine system; the effects of chemotherapy on homeostasis)

Equity and Social Justice

  • A1. Exploring
    • A1.1 explore a variety of topics related to equity and social justice (e.g., media representations of women in politics, effects of social networking on activism) to identify topics for research and inquiry
    • A1.2 identify key concepts (e.g., through discussion, brainstorming, use of visual organizers) related to their selected topics
    • A1.3 formulate effective questions to guide their research and inquiry
  • A2. Investigating
    • A2.2 locate and select information relevant to their investigations from a variety of primary sources
    • A2.3 based on preliminary research, for each investigation formulate a hypothesis, thesis statement, or research question, and use it to focus their research
  • A3. Processing Information
    • A3.1 assess various aspects of information gathered from primary and secondary sources
  • B1. Approaches and Perspectives
    • B1.3 explain how individual and systemic factors (e.g., fear, greed, isolation, pressure to conform, poverty, individual and systemic discrimination) can cause or perpetuate inequity and social injustice
  • C2. Leadership
    • C2.3 analyse equity and social justice issues that have been confronted by various religious leaders and movements, and assess the contributions that specific religious leaders and movements have made to the advancement of equity and social justice

World Cultures

  • D1.1 demonstrate an understanding of the dynamics of power relations within specific cultural groups
  • D2.1 explain the impact of colonization on Aboriginal communities in Canada and other countries

Families in Canada

  • D1.1 analyse the significance of recent demographic trends relating to the lives of individuals

Analysing Current Economic Issues

E3. International Economic Power and Inequality

  • E3.1 analyse data on global economic disparities and explain the main causes and effects of economic marginalization
  • E3.2 assess responses to economic disparity by various intergovernmental organizations
  • E3.3 explain how various social movements and social justice organizations address global economic inequality, and assess their effectiveness

The Environment and Resource Management

E1.1 analyse the role of governments in protecting the environment, locally, nationally, and globally


Legal Studies

E1.3 explain some key similarities and differences between Canada’s system of government and that of other countries


Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

Last modified: 
Jun 6, 2024