Skip to main content

Ontario Resource Guide

Kids Boost Immunity matches the Ontario curriculum outcomes listed below. You can also read a description of the core lessons available for Ontario students. Each grade has a tailored selection of lessons that fit their curricular need. Please note that this is not an exhaustive list of the curricular fit - teachers on KBI have found many more curriculum connections than outlined here! Continue scrolling down to see a short description of the core lessons available for each grade.

 

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Ontario curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Health & Physical Education

Strand A. Social-Emotional Learning Skills

  • A1. apply, to the best of their ability, a range of social-emotional learning skills as they acquire knowledge and skills in connection with the expectations in the Active Living, Movement Competence, and Healthy Living strands for this grade.
    • A1.1 apply skills that help them identify and manage emotions as they participate in learning experiences in health and physical education, in order to improve their ability to express their own feelings and understand and respond to the feelings of others 
    • A1.2 apply skills that help them to recognize sources of stress and to cope with challenges, including help-seeking behaviours, as they participate in learning experiences in health and physical education, in order to support the development of personal resilience 
    • A1.3 apply skills that help them develop habits of mind that support positive motivation and perseverance as they participate in learning experiences in health and physical education, in order to promote a sense of optimism and hope
    • A1.6 apply skills that help them think critically and creatively as they participate in learning experiences in health and physical education, in order to support making connections, analysing, evaluating, problem solving, and decision making

Strand D. Healthy Living

  • D1. demonstrate an understanding of factors that contribute to healthy development
  • D2. demonstrate the ability to apply health knowledge and social-emotional learning skills to make reasoned decisions and take appropriate actions relating to their personal health and well-being
    • D2.4 demonstrate an understanding of personal care needs and the application of personal hygienic practices associated with the onset of puberty (e.g., increased importance of regular bathing/showering and regular clothing changes; use of hygiene products; continuing importance of regular hygiene practices, including hand washing, oral health care, and care of prosthetic devices and residual limbs
  • D3. demonstrate the ability to make connections that relate to health and well-being – how their choices and behaviours affect both themselves and others, and how factors in the world around them affect their own and others’ health and well-being.

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Ontario curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Science

1. Relating Science and Technology to Society and the Environment

  • 1.1 assess the effects of social and environmental factors on human health, and propose ways in which individuals can reduce the harmful effects of these factors and take advantage of those that are beneficial
  • 1.2 evaluate the effects, both beneficial and harmful, of various technologies on human body systems, taking different perspectives into account

2. Developing Investigation and Communication Skills

  • 2.2 use scientific inquiry/experimentation skills (see page 12) to investigate changes in body systems (e.g., heart rate, breathing, body temperature) as a result of physical activity (e.g., exercise, resting, eating) 

3. Understanding Basic Concepts

  • 3.4 identify common diseases and the organs and/or body systems that they affect

Social Science

Strand A. Heritage and Identity: Interactions of Indigenous Peoples and Europeans prior to 1713, in What Would Eventually Become Canada

A1. Application: The Impact of Interactions

  • A1.1 describe some of the positive and negative consequences of contact between Indigenous peoples and European explorers and settlers in what would eventually become Canada (e.g., with reference to the impact of European diseases on First Nations ...), and analyse their significance.
  • A2.3 analyse and construct maps as part of their investigations into interactions among Indigenous peoples, among Europeans, and between Indigenous and European people in what would eventually become Canada
  • A2.4 interpret and analyse information and evidence relevant to their investigations, using a variety of tools
  • A3.5 describe significant aspects of the interactions between Indigenous peoples and European explorers and settlers in what would eventually become Canada

Strand B. People and Environments: The Role of Government and Responsible Citizenship

  • B1. Application: Governments and Citizens Working Together
    • B1.1 assess the effectiveness of actions taken by one or more levels of government, including Indigenous governments, to address an issue of national, provincial/territorial, and/or local significance
    • B1.2 create a plan of action to address a social issue of local, provincial/territorial, and/or national significance), specifying the actions to be taken by the appropriate government or governments, including Indigenous governments, as well as by citizens
  • B2. Inquiry: Differing Perspectives on Social and Environmental Issues
    • B2.1 formulate questions to guide investigations into social and/or environmental issues in Canada from various perspectives, including the perspective of Indigenous peoples and of the level (or levels) of government responsible for addressing the issues
    • B2.1 formulate questions to guide investigations into social and/or environmental issues in Canada from various perspectives, including the perspective of Indigenous peoples and of the level (or levels) of government responsible for addressing the issues
    • B2.2 gather and organize a variety of information and data that present various perspectives about Canadian social and/or environmental issues, including the perspectives of Indigenous peoples and of the level (or levels) of government responsible for addressing the issues
    • B2.3 analyse and construct maps in various formats, including digital formats, as part of their investigations into social and/or environmental issues
    • B2.4 interpret and analyse information and data relevant to their investigations, using a variety of tools
    • B2.5 evaluate evidence and draw conclusions about social and/or environmental issues, outlining the strengths and weaknesses of different perspectives on the issues, including the perspectives of Indigenous peoples and of the level (or levels) of government responsible for addressing the issues
    • B2.6 communicate the results of their inquiries, using appropriate vocabulary
  • B3. Understanding Context: Roles and Responsibilities of Government and Citizens
    • B3.2 describe the jurisdiction of different levels of government in Canada, as well as of some other elected bodies (i.e., federal, provincial, territorial, and municipal governments; band councils; school boards), and some of the services provided by each
    • B3.4 describe the shared responsibility of various levels of government for providing some services and for dealing with selected social and environmental issues
    • B3.7 describe key actions taken by governments, including Indigenous governments, to solve some significant national, provincial/territorial, and/or local issues
    • B3.8 explain why different groups may have different perspectives on specific social and environmental issues
    • B3.9 describe some different ways in which citizens can take action to address social and environmental issues

Health & Physical Education

Strand A. Social-Emotional Learning Skills

  • A1.1 apply skills that help them identify and manage emotions as they participate in learning experiences in health and physical education, in order to improve their ability to express their own feelings and understand and respond to the feelings of others
  • A1.2 apply skills that help them to recognize sources of stress and to cope with challenges, including help-seeking behaviours, as they participate in learning experiences in health and physical education, in order to support the development of personal resilience
  • A1.3 apply skills that help them develop habits of mind that support positive motivation and perseverance as they participate in learning experiences in health and physical education, in order to promote a sense of optimism and hope
  • A1.6 apply skills that help them think critically and creatively as they participate in learning experiences in health and physical education, in order to support making connections, analysing, evaluating, problem solving, and decision making

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Ontario curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Math

Patterning and Algebra

  • describe and represent relationships in growing and shrinking patterns (where the terms are whole numbers),and investigate repeating patterns involving rotations
  • use variables in simple algebraic expressions and equations to describe relationships

Data Management and Probability

  • collect and organize discrete or continuous primary data and secondary data and display the data using charts and graphs, including continuous line graphs
  • read, describe, and interpret data, and explain relationships between sets of data
  • determine the theoretical probability of an outcome in a probability experiment, and use it to predict the frequency of the outcome.

Science

Understanding Life Systems: Biodiversity

2. investigate the characteristics of living things, and classify diverse organisms according to specific characteristics

  • Developing Investigation and Communication Skills
    • 2.3 use scientific inquiry/research skills (see page 15) to compare the characteristics of organisms within the plant or animal kingdoms
  • Understanding Basic Concepts
    • 3.1 identify and describe the distinguishing characteristics of different groups of plants and animals
    • 3.3 describe ways in which biodiversity within species is important for maintaining the resilience of those species

Social Science

Heritage and Identity: Communities in Canada, Past and Present

  • A2. Inquiry: The Perspectives of Diverse Communities
    • A2.1 formulate questions to guide investigations into different perspectives on the historical and/or contemporary experiences of a few distinct communities, including First Nations, Métis, and/or Inuit communities, in Canada
    • A2.2 gather and organize information from a variety of primary and secondary sources 

People and Environments: Canada's Interactions With The Global Community

  • B1. Application: Canada and International Cooperation
    • B1.1 explain why Canada participates in specific international accords and organizations, and assess the influence of some significant accords and/or organizations in which Canada participates 
    • B1.2 analyse responses of Canadian governments, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and individual citizens to an economic, environmental,  political, and/or social issue of international significance 
    • B1.3 explain why some environmental issues are of international importance and require the participation of other regions of the world, along with that of Canada, if they are to be effectively addressed
  • B2. Inquiry: Responses to Global Issues
    • B2.1 formulate questions to guide investigations into global issues of political, social, economic, and/or environmental importance, their impact on the global community, and responses to the issues
    • B2.2 gather and organize information on global issues of political, social, economic, and/or environmental importance, including their impact and responses to them, using a variety of resources and various technologies
    • B2.3 analyse and construct different types of maps, both print and digital, as part of their investigations into global issues, their impact, and responses to them
    • B2.4 interpret and analyse information and data relevant to their investigations, using a variety of tools
    • B2.5 evaluate evidence and draw conclusions about global issues of political, social, economic, and/or environmental importance, their impact on the global community, and responses to the issues
  • B3. Understanding Context: Canada’s Global Interactions
    • B3.1 identify some of the major ways in which the Canadian government interacts with other nations of the world
    • B3.2 describe Canada’s participation in different international accords, organizations, and/or programs
    • B3.3 describe several groups or organizations through which Canada and Canadians are involved in global issues
    • B3.4 describe the responses of the Canadian government and some NGOs to different disasters and emergencies around the world
    • B3.5 identify some significant political, social, and economic interactions between Canada and other regions of the world, and describe some ways in which they affect these regions
    • B3.6 identify and locate on a map countries and regions with which Canada has a significant interrelationship, and use longitude and latitude to locate cities in these countries/regions
    • B3.8 describe significant economic effects on Canada and Canadians of interactions between Canada and other regions of the world

Health & Physical Education

Strand A. Social-Emotional Learning Skills

  • A1.2 apply skills that help them to recognize sources of stress and to cope with challenges, including help-seeking behaviours, as they participate in learning experiences in health and physical education, in order to support the development of personal resilience
  • A1.6 apply skills that help them think critically and creatively as they participate in learning experiences in health and physical education, in order to support making connections, analysing, evaluating, problem solving, and decision making

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Ontario curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Science

“It is important [ ] that students see science and technology in this wider context – as endeavours with important consequences for people and other living things – and that they learn to connect their knowledge of science and technology to the world beyond the school.” p. 4-5). All of the KBI science lessons meet this over-arching goal.


History

A1. Application: Colonial and Present-day Canada

  • A1.2 analyse some of the main challenges facing various individuals, groups, and/or communities, including First Nations, Métis, and Inuit individuals and/or communities, in Canada between 1713 and 1800 and ways in which people responded to those challenges, and assess similarities and differences between some of these challenges ((e.g., with reference to conflict arising from imperial rivalries... disease;...) and responses and those of people in present-day Canada

A2. Inquiry: From New France to British North America

  • A2.3 assess the credibility of sources and information relevant to their investigations
  • A3.7 describe significant interactions between various individuals, groups, and institutions in Canada during this period

 


Health & Physical Education

  • A1.6 apply skills that help them think critically and creatively as they participate in learning experiences in health and physical education, in order to support making connections, analysing, evaluating, problem solving, and decision making

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade



All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Ontario curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Science

“It is important [ ] that students see science and technology in this wider context – as endeavours with important consequences for people and other living things – and that they learn to connect their knowledge of science and technology to the world beyond the school.” p. 4-5). All of the KBI science lessons meet this over-arching goal.

Understanding Life Systems: Cells

  • 3. Understanding Basic Concepts
    • 3.1 demonstrate an understanding of the postulates of the cell theory
    • 3.2 identify structures and organelles in cells, including the nucleus, cell membrane, cell wall, chloroplasts, vacuole, mitochondria, and cytoplasm, and explain the basic functions of each
    • 3.5 identify unicellular organisms (e.g., amoebae) and multicellular organisms (e.g., invertebrates [worms], vertebrates [frogs]), and compare ways in which they meet their basic needs

Geography

  • B1. Application: Global Inequalities in Quality of Life
    • B1.1 analyse some interrelationships among factors that can contribute to quality of life
    • B1.2 analyse how various factors have affected the economies of specific developed and developing countries around the world, and explain the interrelationship between these factors and quality of life in some of these countries
    • B1.3 assess the effectiveness of various programs and policies aimed at improving the quality of life in various countries
    • B1.4 assess the effectiveness of media in improving the quality of life in some countries/regions around the world
  • B2. Inquiry: Development and Quality of Life Issues
    • B2.1 formulate questions to guide investigations into issues related to global development and quality of life from a geographic perspective
    • B2.2 gather and organize data and information from a variety of sources and using various technologies to investigate issues related to global development and quality of life from a geographic perspective
    • B2.3 analyse and construct digital and print maps as part of their investigations into issues related to global development and quality of life
    • B2.4 interpret and analyse data and information relevant to their investigations, using various tools and spatial technologie
    • B2.5 evaluate evidence and draw conclusions about issues related to global development and quality of life
  • B3. Understanding Geographic Context: Global Economic Development and Quality of Life
    • B3.1 identify and describe the significance of several indicators that are commonly used to measure quality of life on a global scale
    • B3.2 compare findings with respect to selected quality of life indicators in some developing and more developed countries
    • B3.5 identify various groups and organizations that work to improve quality of life
    • B3.9 describe the spatial distribution of wealth, both globally and within selected countries/ regions

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Ontario curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Science

A1. Scientific Investigation Skills

  • A1.1 formulate scientific questions about observed relationships, ideas, problems, and/or issues, make predictions, and/or formulate hypotheses to focus inquiries or research
  • A1.3 identify and locate print, electronic, and human sources that are relevant to research questions
  • A1.6 gather data from laboratory and other sources, and organize and record the data using appropriate formats, including tables, flow charts, graphs, and/or diagrams
  • A1.8 analyse and interpret qualitative and/or quantitative data to determine whether the evidence supports or refutes the initial prediction or hypothesis, identifying possible sources of error, bias, or uncertainty
  • A1.9 analyse the information gathered from research sources for reliability and bias

A2. Career Exploration

  • A2.1 identify and describe a variety of careers related to the fields of science under study (e.g., astrophysicist, geophysicist, conservation officer, park warden, fire protection engineer, hydrologist, electrician) and the education and training necessary for these careers
  • A2.2 identify scientists, including Canadians (e.g., David Suzuki, Howard Alper, Roberta Bondar, Kenneth Hill), who have made a contribution to the fields of science under study

History and Geography

“Citizenship education is an important facet of students’ overall education. In ...the social studies, [ ] history, and geography curriculum, students are given opportunities to learn about what it means to be a responsible, active citizen in the community of the classroom and the diverse communities to which they belong within and outside the school. It is important for students to understand that they belong to many communities and that, ultimately, they are all citizens of the global community.” (Ontario Social Studies, History and Geography, p. 9).


Geography

A. Geographic Inquiry and Skill Development

  • A1.3 assess the credibility of sources and information relevant to their investigations

D. Changing Populations

  • D1.2 identify global demographic disparities that are of concern to people living in Canada, and assess the roles of individuals, organizations, and governments in Canada in addressing them
  • D1.3 determine criteria (e.g., number of people affected, type of political leadership in region of need, degree and type of support required from Canada, ability to make a difference for the long term) that should be used to assess Canada’s responses to global population issues (e.g., food and water shortages, lack of health care, illiteracy, displacement, poverty, overcrowding)

History

A1.3 assess the credibility of sources and information relevant to their investigations


 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Ontario curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Science

A. Scientific Investigation Skills and Career Exploration

  • A1.1 formulate scientific questions about observed relationships, ideas, problems, and/or issues, make predictions, and/or formulate hypotheses to focus inquiries or research
  • A1.3 identify and locate print, electronic, and human sources that are relevant to research questions
  • A1.7 select, organize, and record relevant information on research topics from various sources, including electronic, print, and/or human sources (e.g., websites for public health organizations, federal and provincial government publications, reference books, personal interviews), using recommended formats and an accepted form of academic documentation
  • A1.9 analyse the information gathered from research sources for reliability and bias
  • A2.1 identify and describe a variety of careers related to the fields of science under study (e.g., meteorologist, medical illustrator, geochemist, optical physicist) and the education and training necessary for these careers

B. Biology: Tissues, Organs, and Systems of Living Things

  • B1.3 describe public health strategies related to systems biology (e.g., cancer screening and prevention programs; vaccines against the human papillomavirus [HPV] and measles, mumps, and rubella [MMR]; AIDS education), and assess their impact on society [AI, C].
    • Sample issue: Early-childhood vaccination programs have greatly reduced the incidence of certain diseases and the social and medical costs associated with them. Influenced by controversial studies arguing that there may be health risks associated with such vaccines, some parents have chosen not to vaccinate their children, which could lead to a resurgence of these potentially deadly diseases.
  • B2.1 use appropriate terminology related to cells, tissues, organs, and systems of living things, including, but not limited to: absorption, anaphase, capillaries, concentration, differentiation, diffusion, meristematic, mesophyll, phloem, prophase, red blood cells, regeneration, stomate, and xylem [C]
  • B2.7 use a research process to investigate a disease or abnormality related to tissues, organs, or systems of humans or plants (e.g., heart disease, tobacco mosaic virus, wheat rust) [IP, PR, C]
  • B3.4 explain the primary functions of a variety of systems in animals (e.g., the circulatory system transports materials through the organism; the respiratory system supplies oxygen to and removes carbon dioxide from the body)
  • B3.5 explain the interaction of different systems within an organism (e.g., the respiratory system brings oxygen into the body, and the circulatory system transports the oxygen to cells) and why such interactions are necessary for the organism’s survival

Civics and Citizenship

  • B. Civic Awareness
    • B1.4 communicate their own position on some issues of civic importance at the local, national, and/or global level (e.g., equitable availability of extracurricular activities in schools, a local land-use conflict, poverty or violence in the local community, electoral reform, the debate over Sharia law in Ontario, the level of Canada’s contribution to international development assistance, food security, Aboriginal land rights), explaining how their position is influenced by their beliefs/values
    • B2.2 explain, with reference to issues of civic importance, the roles and responsibilities of different levels of government in Canada (e.g., federal, provincial and territorial, municipal, Indigenous governments) and of key figures at each level
    • B2.3 describe, with reference to both the federal and provincial governments, the functions of the three branches of government in Canada (i.e., executive, legislative, judicial) and the roles/responsibilities of key positions within governments (e.g., the governor general, a lieutenant governor, the prime minister, a premier, cabinet ministers, a leader of the opposition, a speaker, the chief justice of the Supreme Court of Canada), and explain how the branches help ensure political and social stability in Canada
    • B2.4 explain, with reference to issues of civic importance, how various groups and institutions (e.g., lobby groups, unions, the media, NGOs, international organizations) can influence government policy
    • B3.5 identify examples of human rights violations around the world (e.g., hate crimes, torture, genocide, political imprisonment, recruitment of child soldiers, gender-based violence and discrimination), and assess the effectiveness of responses to such violations
  • C. Civic Engagement in Action
    • C1.2 describe a variety of ways in which they could make a civic contribution at the local, national, and/or global level
    • C1.3 explain how various actions can contribute to the common good at the local, national, and/ or global level

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Ontario curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Biology

A1. Scientific Investigation Skills

  • A1.1 formulate relevant scientific questions about observed relationships, ideas, problems, or issues, make informed predictions, and/or formulate educated hypotheses to focus inquiries or research
  • A1.3 identify and locate a variety of print and electronic sources that enable them to address research topics fully and appropriately
  • A1.5 conduct inquiries, controlling relevant variables, adapting or extending procedures as required, and using appropriate materials and equipment safely, accurately, and effectively, to collect observations and data
  • A1.7 select, organize, and record relevant information on research topics from a variety of appropriate sources, including electronic, print, and/or human sources, using suitable formats and an accepted form of academic documentation
  • A1.9 analyse the information gathered from research sources for logic, accuracy, reliability, adequacy, and bias
  • A2.1 identify and describe a variety of careers related to the fields of science under study (e.g., zoologist, botanist, geneticist, ecologist, pharmacologist, farmer, forester, horticulturalist) and the education and training necessary for these careers

B. Diversity of Living Things

  • B2.1 use appropriate terminology related to biodiversity, including, but not limited to: genetic diversity, species diversity, structural diversity, protists, bacteria, fungi, binomial nomenclature, and morphology [C]
  • B2.2 classify, and draw biological diagrams of, representative organisms from each of the kingdoms according to their unifying and distinguishing anatomical and physiological characteristics (e.g., vertebrate or invertebrate organisms, vascular or nonvascular plants) [PR, AI, C]
  • B2.4 create and apply a dichotomous key to identify and classify organisms from each of the kingdoms [PR, AI, C]
  • B3.1 explain the fundamental principles of taxonomy and phylogeny by defining concepts of taxonomic rank and relationship, such as genus, species, and taxon
  • B3.2 compare and contrast the structure and function of different types of prokaryotes, eukaryotes, and viruses (e.g., compare and contrast genetic material, metabolism, organelles, and other cell parts)
  • B3.3 describe unifying and distinguishing anatomical and physiological characteristics (e.g., types of reproduction, habitat, general physical structure) of representative organisms from each of the kingdoms
  • B3.4 explain key structural and functional changes in organisms as they have evolved over time (e.g., the evolution of eukaryotes from prokaryotes, of plants from unicellular organisms)

Science 

  • A1.1 formulate relevant scientific questions about observed relationships, ideas, problems, or issues, make informed predictions, and/or formulate educated hypotheses to focus inquiries or research
  • A1.3 identify and locate a variety of print and electronic sources that enable them to address research topics fully and appropriately
  • A1.5 conduct inquiries, controlling relevant variables, adapting or extending procedures as required, and using appropriate materials and equipment safely, accurately, and effectively, to collect observations and data
  • A1.6 compile accurate data from laboratory and other sources, and organize and record the data, using appropriate formats, including tables, flow charts, graphs, and/or diagrams
  • A1.7 select, organize, and record relevant information on research topics from a variety of appropriate sources, including electronic, print, and/or human sources, using suitable formats and an accepted form of academic documentation
  • A1.9 analyse the information gathered from research sources for logic, accuracy, reliability, adequacy, and bias
  • A2.1 identify and describe a variety of careers related to the fields of science under study (e.g., nuclear medicine technician, nurse practitioner, hematologist, dietitian, geneticist) and the education and training necessary for these careers

C. Microbiology

  • C1.2 analyse ethical issues related to the use of microorganisms in biotechnology (e.g., with respect to the use of bacterial insecticides, the patenting of modified microorganisms) [AI, C]

The Individual and the Economy

C4. Economic Inequality

  • C4.1 explain how various factors contribute to income inequality
  • C4.2 explain how governments, firms, and non-governmental organizations respond to economic inequalities

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Ontario curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Science (University Prep)

C. Pathogens and Disease

  • C1.1 analyse, on the basis of research, the impact, both positive and negative, of scientific and technological advances intended to prevent the spread of illness and disease [IP, PR, AI, C]
  • C1.2 evaluate the impact of individual choices (e.g., with respect to vaccination, the proper use of antibiotics or mosquito repellent) on the control of pathogens and the prevention of disease [AI, C]
  • C2.1 use appropriate terminology related to pathogens and diseases, including, but not limited to: parasite, epidemiology, pathogenesis, and vector [C]
  • C2.2 analyse, on the basis of inquiry, the effects of various treatments on pathogenesis (e.g., the effect of mouthwash or penicillin on the growth of bacteria) [PR, AI]
  • C2.3 analyse, using prepared slides or computer simulations, the characteristics, properties, and virulence of various bacteria [PR, AI]
  • C3.2 describe the mode of transmission of various diseases, including those that are insect-borne (e.g., malaria, encephalitis), airborne (e.g., influenza, tuberculosis), water-borne (e.g., cholera, poliomyelitis), sexually transmitted (e.g., HIV/AIDS), and food-borne (e.g., mad cow disease, trichinosis, salmonella)
  • C3.3 explain how the human immune response acts as a natural defence against infection
  • C3.4 describe the role of vaccines, antibiotics, antiretrovirals, and other drug therapies and antiseptics in the control of pathogenesis
  • C3.5 describe non-medical ways to protect oneself from contracting pathogenic disease in a variety of situations (e.g., aseptic techniques such as wearing sterile gloves; proper personal hygiene such as frequent and thorough hand washing; the use of insect repellent)
  • C3.6 describe some of the means used by international non-governmental organizations (e.g., Médecins sans Frontières, Oxfam, Ryan’s Well Foundation, UN agencies, the Stephen Lewis Foundation) to control the spread of disease (e.g., distribution of vaccines, medication, malaria nets; installing wells so people have access to clean water; public education on strategies for transmission prevention)
  • C3.7 describe aseptic techniques used in the workplace, and explain their importance in preventing the spread of pathogens (e.g., cooking meat to a safe temperature and refrigerating leftovers quickly to avoid growth of bacteria in restaurant food; frequent hand sanitizing and use of sterile gloves in hospitals to prevent the spread of pathogens to vulnerable populations)

E. Science and Public Health Issues

  • E1.1 assess the impact of scientific research and technological advances on public health around the world (e.g., widespread immunization for diseases such as polio, telemedicine for people in remote areas, new drug therapies to combat disease) [AI, C]
  • E1.2 assess, on the basis of research, the effectiveness of a municipal, provincial, or federal government initiative intended to protect the public health of Canadians (e.g., immunization programs, smoking bans, Health Canada advisories) [IP, PR, AI, C]
  • E2.2 analyse and interpret, using a case study or research data, scientific evidence regarding the effectiveness of a public health program intended to reduce disease transmission (e.g., distribution of bed nets to fight malaria; safe injection sites for intravenous drug users; programs to encourage hand washing in hospitals to stop the spread of C. difficile) [AI, C]
  • E2.3 use a research process to investigate public health strategies developed to combat a potential pandemic (e.g., SARS, C. difficile, avian flu) [IP, PR]
  • E2.4 use a research process to locate a media report on a public health issue (e.g., the handling of SARS, the banning of bisphenol-A in plastic bottles), summarize its arguments, and assess them from a scientific perspective [IP, PR, AI, C]
  • E3.1 describe the characteristics according to which a pandemic is classified (e.g., the strain of a virus, its mode of transmission)
  • E3.2 explain how pandemics have affected humanity throughout history (e.g., the bubonic plague of 1347–1352 in Europe, the cholera pandemic of 1817–1823 in Asia, the global Spanish influenza pandemic of 1918–1920, the contemporary AIDS pandemic)
  • E3.3 explain the impact of various threats to public health, including infectious diseases (e.g., hepatitis, HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria, sexually transmitted diseases), chronic diseases (e.g., cardiovascular disease, diabetes, asthma), and environmental factors (e.g., climate change, air pollution, chemical pollutants, radiation)
  • E3.4 explain a variety of social factors that can promote the rapid spread of infectious diseases (e.g., global population growth, international travel, poor sanitation, lack of clean drinking water)
  • E3.5 describe public health measures, including legislation, that are used for the protection of the public (e.g., quarantines, vaccinations, water chlorination, regulations on what items travellers can bring into a country)
  • E3.6 explain why some populations are particularly susceptible to specific health problems (e.g., the risk of diabetes among First Nations populations; the risk of thalassemia among Mediterranean populations; the risk of pneumonia and tuberculosis among people with HIV/AIDS)

Science (Workplace Prep)

D. Disease and its Prevention

  • D1.1 evaluate the effectiveness of a public policy measure or technological advance intended to control the spread of disease (e.g., mandatory immunization, screening for tuberculosis, quarantine) [AI, C]
  • D1.2 evaluate the impact, current and/or potential, of an individual’s choice not to participate in a public health strategy intended to reduce the spread of disease (e.g., a hospital worker who does not follow recommendations regarding hand washing; a worker in a retirement home who does not get a flu shot) [AI, C]
  • D1.3 analyse, on the basis of research, the advantages and disadvantages of selected technologies used to try to control disease (e.g., the effectiveness of pharmaceuticals at combating disease; the side effects of a variety of drugs) [IP, PR, AI, C]
  • D2.1 use appropriate terminology related to the prevention of disease, including, but not limited to: communicable, non-communicable, microorganism, pathogen, disease, epidemiology, vector, immunization record, quarantine, pandemic, vaccine, antiseptic, sterilization, disinfection, and pasteurization [C]
  • D2.3 investigate the effects of various drug therapies (e.g., different antibiotic discs) on the growth of bacteria [PR, AI]
  • D3.1 describe modes of transmission of some communicable diseases, including those that are insect-borne (e.g., malaria, encephalitis), airborne (e.g., influenza, tuberculosis), waterborne (e.g., cholera, poliomyelitis), sexually transmitted (e.g., HIV/AIDS), and food-borne (e.g., mad cow disease, trichinosis, salmonella)
  • D3.2 identify the causes and symptoms of various diseases (e.g., AIDS, influenza, salmonella, West Nile virus), and describe measures intended to prevent their spread
  • D3.3 describe the reasons for immunization against specific diseases, the function of records of immunization in Ontario, and the importance of maintaining a personal immunization schedule
  • D3.4 describe the use of vaccines, antibiotics, antiseptics, and other medical measures, both conventional and alternative, intended to control disease
  • D3.5 explain the differences between bacteria and viruses in terms of their size, structure, and reproduction, and the methods used to control their spread

Biology

A1. Scientific Investigation Skills

  • A1.1 formulate relevant scientific questions about observed relationships, ideas, problems, or issues, make informed predictions, and/or formulate educated hypotheses to focus inquiries or research
  • A1.3 identify and locate a variety of print and electronic sources that enable them to address research topics fully and appropriately
  • A1.6 compile accurate data from laboratory and other sources, and organize and record the data, using appropriate formats, including tables, flow charts, graphs, and/or diagrams
  • A1.7 select, organize, and record relevant information on research topics from a variety of appropriate sources, including electronic, print, and/or human sources, using suitable formats and an accepted form of academic documentation
  • A1.9 analyse the information gathered from research sources for logic, accuracy, reliability, adequacy, and bias
  • A2.1 identify and describe a variety of careers related to the fields of science under study (e.g., scientific journalist, fisheries and wildlife officer, physician, infectious disease researcher, geneticist) and the education and training necessary for these careers

E. Homeostasis

  • E2.1 use appropriate terminology related to homeostasis, including, but not limited to: insulin, testosterone, estrogen, nephron, dialysis, pituitary, synapse, and acetylcholine [C]
  • E2.2 plan and construct a model to illustrate the essential components of the homeostatic process (e.g., create a flow chart that illustrates representative feedback mechanisms in living things) [IP, AI, C]
  • E2.3 plan and conduct an investigation to study a feedback system (e.g., stimulus response loop) [IP, PR, AI]
  • E3.1 describe the anatomy and physiology of the endocrine, excretory, and nervous systems, and explain how these systems interact to maintain homeostasis
  • E3.2 explain how reproductive hormones act in human feedback mechanisms to maintain homeostasis (e.g., the actions of male and female reproductive hormones on their respective body systems)
  • E3.3 describe the homeostatic processes involved in maintaining water, ionic, thermal, and acid–base equilibrium, and explain how these processes help body systems respond to both a change in environment and the effects of medical treatments (e.g., the role of feedback mechanisms in water balance or thermoregulation; how the buffering system of blood maintains the body’s pH balance; the effect of medical treatments on the endocrine system; the effects of chemotherapy on homeostasis)

Equity and Social Justice

  • A1. Exploring
    • A1.1 explore a variety of topics related to equity and social justice (e.g., media representations of women in politics, effects of social networking on activism) to identify topics for research and inquiry
    • A1.2 identify key concepts (e.g., through discussion, brainstorming, use of visual organizers) related to their selected topics
    • A1.3 formulate effective questions to guide their research and inquiry
  • A2. Investigating
    • A2.2 locate and select information relevant to their investigations from a variety of primary sources
    • A2.3 based on preliminary research, for each investigation formulate a hypothesis, thesis statement, or research question, and use it to focus their research
  • A3. Processing Information
    • A3.1 assess various aspects of information gathered from primary and secondary sources
  • B1. Approaches and Perspectives
    • B1.3 explain how individual and systemic factors (e.g., fear, greed, isolation, pressure to conform, poverty, individual and systemic discrimination) can cause or perpetuate inequity and social injustice
  • C2. Leadership
    • C2.3 analyse equity and social justice issues that have been confronted by various religious leaders and movements, and assess the contributions that specific religious leaders and movements have made to the advancement of equity and social justice

World Cultures

  • D1.1 demonstrate an understanding of the dynamics of power relations within specific cultural groups
  • D2.1 explain the impact of colonization on Aboriginal communities in Canada and other countries

Families in Canada

  • D1.1 analyse the significance of recent demographic trends relating to the lives of individuals

Analysing Current Economic Issues

E3. International Economic Power and Inequality

  • E3.1 analyse data on global economic disparities and explain the main causes and effects of economic marginalization
  • E3.2 assess responses to economic disparity by various intergovernmental organizations
  • E3.3 explain how various social movements and social justice organizations address global economic inequality, and assess their effectiveness

The Environment and Resource Management

E1.1 analyse the role of governments in protecting the environment, locally, nationally, and globally


Legal Studies

E1.3 explain some key similarities and differences between Canada’s system of government and that of other countries


 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

Last modified: 
Sep 8, 2020