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Manitoba Resource Guide

Kids Boost Immunity matches the Manitoba curriculum outcomes listed below. You can also read a description of the core lessons available for Manitoba students. Each grade has a tailored selection of lessons that fit their curricular need. Please note that this is not an exhaustive list of the curricular fit - teachers on KBI have found many more curriculum connections than outlined here! Continue scrolling down to see a short description of the core lessons available for each grade.

 

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Manitoba curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Social Studies

Skills

  • 4-S-200 Select information from oral, visual, material, print, or electronic sources. Examples: maps, atlases... 
  • 4-S-206 Interpret maps that include a title, legend, compass rose, and grid. 
  • 4-S-207 Use cardinal and intermediate directions and simple grids to locate and describe places on maps and globes. 
  • 4-S-300 Formulate questions for research. 
  • 4-S-302 Draw conclusions based on information and evidence. 
  • 4-S-303 Evaluate personal assumptions based on new information and ideas. 
  • 4-S-304 Distinguish fact from opinion. 

Cluster 1 - Geography of Canada

  • 4-KL-015 Describe the relative locations of Manitoba and Canada in the world using cardinal directions.
  • 4-KL-019 Locate the provinces, territories, and capital cities on a map of Canada.

Cluster 2 - Living in Canada

  • 4-KP-041 Explain the purposes of government.
  • 4-KP-042 Identify levels of government in Canada and give examples of their responsibilities. Include: municipal or local, provincial or territorial, First Nation, and federal governments.
  • 4-KE-048 Identify various ways in which governments help people meet their needs. Examples: education, health care, sanitation...

Physical Education/Health Education

Personal and Social Management 

K.4.4.C.4a Identify the stress management skills (e.g., relaxation skills, stress-control skills, positive thinking, guided imagery, use of humour, talking with others...) that may be useful in coping with stress

S.4.4.A.5 Demonstrate use of stress-management strategies (e.g., talking to supportive others, using guided imagery to visualize positive outcomes, using positive self-talk, going for recess or family walk...) by oneself and/or with others in a variety of contexts (e.g., discussion groups, sharing circle, games...)


 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Manitoba curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Science

Cluster 1: Maintaining A Healthy Body

  • 5-1-09 Identify components of the human body’s defenses against infections, and describe their role in defending the body against infection. Include: tears, saliva, skin, white blood cells. GLO: D1, E2
  • 5-1-14 Evaluate information related to body image and health from media sources for science content and bias. Examples: glamorization of smoking in movies, promotion of
  • unrealistic role models in magazines, trivialization of scientific information on television... GLO: B3, C4, C5, C8
  • 5-1-15 Explain how human health may be affected by lifestyle choices and natural- and human-caused environmental factors. Include: smoking and poor air quality may cause respiratory disorders; unhealthy eating and physical inactivity may lead to diabetes or heart disease; prolonged exposure to the Sun can cause skin cancer. GLO: B3, B5, C4, D1

Social Studies

Skills

  • 5-S-105 Recognize bias and discrimination and propose solutions. 
  • 5-S-200 Select information from oral, visual, material, print, or electronic sources. Examples: maps, atlases, art, songs, artifacts, narratives, legends, biographies, historical fiction... 
  • 5-S-202 Distinguish between primary and secondary information sources for research. 
  • 5-S-206 Interpret maps that include a title, legend, compass rose, grid, and scale. 
  • 5-S-207 Use latitude and longitude to locate and describe places on maps and globes. 
  • 5-S-302 Draw conclusions based on research and evidence. 
  • 5-S-303 Evaluate personal assumptions based on new information and ideas. 
  • 5-S-304 Distinguish fact from opinion and interpretation. 
  • 5-S-306 Assess the validity of information sources. Examples: purpose, context, authenticity, origin, objectivity, evidence, reliability...
  • 5-S-308 Compare diverse perspectives in a variety of information sources. 
  • 5-S-309 Interpret information and ideas in a variety of media. Examples: art, music, historical fiction, drama, primary sources...
  • 5-S-310 Recognize that interpretations of history are subject to change as new information is uncovered or acknowledged. 
  • 5-S-402 Support their ideas and opinions with information or observations. 

Cluster 1 - First Peoples

  • 5-VH-008 Value oral tradition as an important source of knowledge about First Peoples. 
  • 5-KH-024 Relate First Peoples’ stories of their pre-contact and early contact with Europeans.

Cluster 2 - Early European Colonization (1600 to 1763)

  • 5-KH-026 Give examples of the impact of interactions between First Peoples and European explorers, colonists, and missionaries. Examples: shared technologies, trade, spread of disease... 

Physical Education/Health Education

Healthy Lifestyle Practices 

  • K.5.5.E.4a Identify characteristics (e.g., transmitted through sexual activity and contact with body fluids; may be fatal...) and effects of HIV and AIDS on the immune system (e.g., destroys specific white cells...).

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Manitoba curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Science

Cluster 1: Diversity of Living Things

  • 6-1-01 Use appropriate vocabulary related to their investigations of the diversity of living things. Include: classification system, classification key, paleontologist, terms related to names of kingdoms and types of vertebrates and invertebrates. GLO: C6, D1
  • 6-1-02 Describe various kinds of classification systems used in everyday life, and identify related advantages and disadvantages. Examples: organization of phone numbers in a phone book, books in a library, groceries in a supermarket... GLO: B1, B2, E1, E2
  • 6-1-03 Develop a system to classify common objects or living things into groups and subgroups, and explain the reasoning used in the system’s development. GLO: A1, C2, E1, E2
  • 6-1-04 Identify living things using an existing classification key, and explain the rationale used. Examples: identification of birds, butterflies, animal tracks, winter twigs... GLO: A1, C2, D1, E2
  • 6-1-05 Identify advantages and disadvantages of having a common classification system for living things, and recognize that the system changes as new evidence comes to light. GLO: A1, A2, D1, E2
  • 6-1-07 Recognize that many living things are difficult to see with the unaided eye, and observe and describe some examples. GLO: C2, D1, E1

Social Studies

Skills

  • 6-S-105 Recognize bias and discrimination and propose solutions. 
  • 6-S-200 Select information from a variety of oral, visual, material, print, or electronic sources. Examples: maps, atlases, art, songs, artifacts, narratives, legends, biographies, historical fiction... 
  • 6-S-202 Distinguish between primary and secondary information sources for research. 
  • 6-S-205 Construct maps that include a title, legend, compass rose, scale, and latitude and longitude. 
  • 6-S-206 Select and interpret various types of maps for specific purposes. 
  • 6-S-207 Use latitude and longitude to locate and describe places on maps and globes. 
  • 6-S-302 Draw conclusions based on research and evidence.
  • 6-S-303 Evaluate personal assumptions based on new information and ideas.
  • 6-S-304 Distinguish fact from opinion and interpretation. 
  • 6-S-306 Assess the validity of information sources. Examples: purpose, context, authenticity, origin, objectivity, evidence, reliability... 
  • 6-S-309 Interpret information and ideas in a variety of media. Examples: art, music, historical fiction, drama, primary sources... 
  • 6-S-310 Recognize that interpretations of history are subject to change as new information is uncovered or acknowledged. 

Cluster 2 - An Emerging Nation (1914 to 1945)

  • 6-KC-003 Recognize Remembrance Day as a commemoration of Canadian participation in world conflicts. 

Cluster 3 - Shaping Contemporary Canada (1945 to Present)

  • 6-KG-045 Give examples of Canada’s participation in the United Nations and other international organizations. Examples: the Commonwealth, La Francophonie, Organization of American States... 

Cluster 4 - Canada Today: Democracy, Diversity, and the Influence of the Past 

  • 6-KP-049 Describe the main features of the Canadian government. Include: parliamentary system, federal democracy.
  • 6-KP-052 Identify the main responsibilities of municipal, provincial, First Nations, and federal governments in Canada. 
  • 6-KP-053 Identify elected or appointed municipal, provincial, and federal government representatives and describe their main responsibilities. Include: Governor General, Manitoba Lieutenant-Governor
  • 6-KP-054 Identify factors that contribute to inequities in Canada and propose solutions. Examples: poverty, racism, sexism... 
  • 6-KG-047 Give examples of Canada’s connections to other regions of the world. Examples: environmental, social, political, economic... 
  • 6-VG-015 Appreciate Canada’s interdependence with other regions of the world. 

Math

  • 6.N.5. Demonstrate an understanding of ratio, concretely, pictorially, and symbolically. [C, CN, PS, R, V]
  • 6.N.6. Demonstrate an understanding of percent (limited to whole numbers), concretely, pictorially, and symbolically. [C, CN, PS, R, V]
    • Explain that “percent” means “out of 100.”
    • Explain that percent is the ratio of a certain number of units to 100 units.
    • Use concrete materials and pictorial representations to illustrate a percent.
    • Record the percent displayed in a concrete or pictorial representation.
    • Express a percent as a fraction and a decimal.
    • Identify and describe percents from real-life contexts and record them symbolically.
    • Solve a problem involving percents.

Physical Education/Health Education

Personal and Social Management 

  • K.4.6.C.4a Identify stress-management strategies (e.g., using self-statements or self-talk, talking to parents, keeping an anger self-inventory, participating in physical activity, keeping a sense of humour...) for controlling anger in different situations (e.g., being called names, losing a game, being pressured by parents or peers...).
  • S.4.6.A.5 Demonstrate the functional use of stress-management strategies (e.g., using self-statements or positive self-talk, talking with others, taking time out, counting to 10, focusing, breathing deeply...) for managing stress in case scenarios related to a variety of situations (e.g., competition, anger, tests, public speaking, conflict, change, failure...).

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade



All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Manitoba curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Science

Cluster 1 - Interactions Within Ecosystems

  • 7-1-14 Identify beneficial and harmful roles played by microorganisms. Examples: beneficial — aid in digestion, composting, food and vaccine production; harmful — cause disease, food spoilage... GLO: B3, C2, D2

Social Studies

Skills

  • 7-S-105 Recognize bias and discrimination and propose solutions. Examples: racism, ageism, heterosexism...
  • 7-S-200 Select information from a variety of oral, visual, material, print, or electronic sources. Examples: maps, atlases, art, songs, artifacts, narratives, legends, biographies, historical fiction... 
  • 7-S-202 Interpret primary and secondary information sources for research.
  • 7-S-205 Construct maps that include a title, legend, compass rose, scale, and latitude and longitude.
  • 7-S-206 Select and interpret various types of maps for specific purposes.
  • 7-S-207 Use latitude and longitude to locate and describe places on maps and globes. 
  • 7-S-300 Plan topics, goals, and methods for inquiry and research.
  • 7-S-302 Draw conclusions based on research and evidence.
  • 7-S-303 Evaluate personal assumptions based on new information and ideas.
  • 7-S-304 Distinguish fact from opinion and interpretation.
  • 7-S-305 Observe and analyze material and visual evidence for research. Examples: artifacts, photographs, works of art...
  • 7-S-306 Assess the validity of information sources. Examples: purpose, context, authenticity, origin, objectivity, evidence, reliability...
  • 7-S-307 Compare differing viewpoints regarding global issues.
  • 7-S-308 Compare diverse perspectives in the media and other information sources.
  • 7-S-309 Interpret information and ideas in a variety of media. Examples: art, music, historical fiction, drama, primary sources...
  • 7-S-310 Recognize that interpretations of history are subject to change as new information is uncovered or acknowledged.
  • 7-S-311 Analyze prejudice, racism, stereotyping, or other forms of bias in the media and other information sources. 

Cluster 1 - World Geography 

  • 7-KL-015 Explain the purpose of latitude, longitude, parallels, and meridians.
  • 7-KG-032 Identify on a world map the more and less developed nations and explain why a nation is considered to be more or less developed. 

Cluster 2 - Global Quality of Life

  • 7-KC-002 Describe the impact of various factors on quality of life in Canada and elsewhere in the world. Examples: access to shelter, food, water, health care, and education;
  • globalization... 
  • 7-KC-004 Describe ways in which their personal actions may affect quality of life for people elsewhere in the world. Examples: consumer choices, conservation actions, sharing of resources, letters and petitions...
  • 7-KP-039 Give examples of government decisions that affect quality of life.
  • 7-VC-004 Be willing to take action to support quality of life for people around the world.
  • 7-KI-007 Describe the impact of discriminatory attitudes and practices on quality of life. Include: racism, prejudice, stereotyping.
  • 7-KC-001 Describe the impact of various factors on citizenship rights in Canada and elsewhere in the world. Examples: laws, culture, labour practices, education...
  • 7-KC-003 Give examples of ways in which quality of life may be enhanced within a democracy. Examples: freedom of association, speech, and the press; universal suffrage...
  • 7-KC-005 Recognize Remembrance Day as a commemoration of Canadian participation in world conflicts.
  • 7-KE-045 Give examples of the uneven distribution of wealth and resources in the world and describe the impact on individuals, communities, and nations.
  • 7-VP-014 Appreciate the positive contributions of various individuals to world affairs.
  • 7-KG-033 Give examples of events and achievements that enhance understanding among peoples and nations. Examples: international sporting events, world fairs and expositions, film, music, and literary festivals, Nobel Prizes...
  • 7-KG-035 Give examples of global cooperation to solve conflicts or disasters.
  • 7-KG-036 Identify various international organizations and describe their role in protecting or enhancing global quality of life. Examples: United Nations, Amnesty International, Greenpeace, Médecins sans frontières...
  • 7-VG-011 Value the contributions of international agencies and humanitarians to quality of life. Examples: Mennonite Central Committee, Red Cross; Nelson Mandela, Mother Teresa...

Physical Education/Health Education

Healthy Lifestyle Practices

  • K.5.7.D.2 Explain different consequences, related to different variables (i.e., fair play, legalities, performance, medical, safety, and financial implications), of taking harmful and beneficial drugs or other substances (e.g., antibiotics, anti-inflammatories, stimulants, narcotics, anabolic steroids, marijuana, diuretics, herbs...).
  • K.5.7.E.4a Identify the causes, nature, methods of transmission (e.g., sexual intercourse, body fluids, contaminated needles, number of sexual partners...) and methods of prevention of AIDS and HIV infection (e.g., sexual abstinence, monogamous relationship with uninfected person, use of condoms...).
  • K.5.7.E.4b Identify the common STIs (e.g., genital herpes, gonorrhoea, chlamydia...), their symptoms, and means of prevention (e.g., sexual abstinence, monogamous relationship with uninfected person, use of condoms...).

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Manitoba curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Science

Cluster 1 - Cells and Systems

  • 8-1-02 Identify characteristics of living things, and describe how different living things exhibit these characteristics. Include: composed of cells; reproduce; grow; repair themselves; require energy; respond to the environment; have a lifespan; produce wastes. GLO: D1, E1
  • 8-1-03 Describe cell theory. Include: all living things are composed of one or more cells; cells are the basic unit of structure and function of any organism; all cells come from pre-existing cells; the activity of an organism as a whole depends on the total activity of all its cells. GLO: A2, D1, E2
  • 8-1-05 Identify and compare major structures in plants and animal cells, and explain their function. Include: cell membrane, cytoplasm, mitochondria, nucleus, vacuoles, cell wall, chloroplasts. GLO: D1, E1
  • 8-1-08 Differentiate between unicellular and multicellular organisms. GLO: D1, E1
  • 8-1-16 Identify components of the primary and secondary defence systems of the human body, and describe their roles. Include: primary defense system — skin, tears, ear wax, saliva, gastric juices, cilia hairs; secondary defense system — white blood cells, antibodies. GLO: D1, E2
  • 8-1-17 Identify medical advances that enhance the human body’s defence mechanisms and describe their effects on society. Examples: vaccines, antibiotics... GLO: A5, B1, B2, B3
  • 8-1-18 Research and describe disorders/diseases that affect body systems, and identify possible preventative measures. Examples: liver disease, diabetes, multiple sclerosis, heart attack, stroke, high/low blood pressure, leukemia, anemia, high cholesterol... GLO: B3, C6, D1

Social Studies

Skills

  • 8-S-105 Recognize bias and discrimination and propose solutions. Examples: racism, ageism, heterosexism...
  • 8-S-200 Select information from a variety of oral, visual, material, print, or electronic sources. Examples: maps, atlases, art, songs, artifacts, narratives, legends, biographies, historical fiction...
  • 8-S-201 Organize and record information in a variety of formats and reference sources appropriately. Examples: maps, charts, outlines, concept maps...
  • 8-S-202 Interpret primary and secondary information sources for research.
  • 8-S-205 Construct maps that include a title, legend, compass rose, scale, and latitude and longitude.
  • 8-S-206 Select, use, and interpret various types of maps for specific purposes. Examples: historical maps and atlases...
  • 8-S-207 Use latitude and longitude to locate and describe places on maps and globes.
  • 8-S-300 Plan topics, goals, and methods for historical inquiry and research.
  • 8-S-303 Evaluate personal assumptions based on new information and ideas.
  • 8-S-304 Distinguish fact from opinion and interpretation.
  • 8-S-305 Observe and analyze material and visual evidence for research. Examples: artifacts, photographs, works of art...
  • 8-S-306 Assess the validity of information sources. Examples: purpose, context, authenticity, origin, objectivity, evidence, reliability...
  • 8-S-308 Compare diverse perspectives in the media and other information sources.
  • 8-S-309 Interpret information and ideas in a variety of media. Examples: art, music, historical fiction, drama, primary sources...
  • 8-S-310 Recognize that interpretations of history are subject to change as new information is uncovered or acknowledged.
  • 8-S-311 Analyze prejudice, racism, stereotyping, or other forms of bias in the media and other information sources.

Physical Education/Health Education

Personal and Social Management

  • S.4.8.A.5 Apply stress-management strategies (e.g., progressive relaxation, deep breathing, guided imagery, focusing, positive thinking, self-talk, talking with others, humour...) in case scenarios related to stressful situations (e.g., coping with anger, sadness, defeat, loss, changes associated with puberty, illness, environmental destruction...).

Healthy Lifestyle Practices

  • K.5.8.B.3 Determine the degree to which technology has had an impact on personal health (e.g., personal fitness equipment/aids; prolonged exposure to technological devices and machines decreases physical activity; effect of media messages on body image...).

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Manitoba curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Science

  • S1-1-17 Discuss current and potential applications and implications of biotechnologies including their effects upon personal and public decision making. Include: genetic engineering, genetic screening, cloning, DNA fingerprinting. GLO: B1, B2, C4, C8
  • S1-1-18 Use the decision-making process to address a current biotechnology issue. GLO: C4, C6, C7, C8

Social Studies

Skills

  • 9-S-200 Select information from a variety of oral, visual, material, print, or electronic sources, including primary and secondary.
  • 9-S-203 Construct maps using a variety of information sources and technologies. Examples: observation, traditional knowledge, compass, Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Global Positioning Systems (GPS)...
  • 9-S-204 Select, use, and interpret various types of maps.
  • 9-S-300 Plan topics, goals, and methods for inquiry and research.
  • 9-S-301 Analyze the context of events, accounts, ideas, and interpretations.
  • 9-S-302 Draw conclusions and make decisions based on research and various types of evidence.
  • 9-S-303 Reconsider personal assumptions based on new information and ideas.
  • 9-S-304 Analyze material and visual evidence during research. Examples: artifacts, photographs, political cartoons, works of art...
  • 9-S-305 Compare diverse perspectives and interpretations in the media and other information sources.
  • 9-S-306 Analyze prejudice, racism, stereotyping, and other forms of bias in the media and in other information sources.
  • 9-S-307 Propose and defend innovative options or solutions to address issues and problems.
  • 9-S-308 Evaluate information from a variety of sources to determine reliability, validity, authenticity, and perspective. Include: student-gathered data.

Cluster 2 - Democracy and Governance in Canada

  • 9-KC-005 Give examples of ways in which government affects their daily lives. Examples: rights and freedoms, security, laws, education, health care, services...
  • 9-KC-006 Describe Canadian parliamentary democracy. Include: constitutional monarchy, federalism, Governor General, Prime Minister, Cabinet, House of Commons, Senate.
  • 9-KC-007 Describe the responsibilities and processes of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of the federal government.
  • 9-KP-044 Describe the division of power and responsibilities of federal, First Nations, provincial, and municipal governments.

Cluster 3 - Canada in the Global Context

  • 9-KL-025 Identify on a world map countries in which events of global significance are taking place.
  • 9-KG-035 Evaluate Canadian perspectives regarding current global issues.
  • 9-KG-036 Give examples of decisions that reflect the responsibilities of global citizenship. Include: personal and national decisions.
  • 9-KG-037 Compare media portrayals of current issues. Include: local, national, international sources.
  • 9-VG-012 Be willing to consider local, national, and global interests in their decisions and actions.
  • 9-KG-034 Give examples of Canada’s connections with other nations. Examples: trade, communication, environment, entertainment, sports...
  • 9-KG-038 Give examples of Canada’s participation within international organizations. Examples: United Nations, Commonwealth, la Francophonie, Olympics...
  • 9-KG-039 Evaluate Canada’s contributions to international aid and development. Include: government and NGOs
  • 9-VG-011 Appreciate Remembrance Day as a commemoration of Canadian participation in world conflicts.
  • 9-KE-050 Give examples of the cultural, political, and economic impact of globalization on Canada. Include: transnational corporations.

Cluster 4 - Canada: Opportunities and Challenges

  • 9-KH-033 Give examples of social and technological changes that continue to influence quality of life in Canada. Examples: education, health care, social programs, communication, transportation...
  • 9-VH-010 Appreciate that knowledge of the past helps to understand the present and prepare for the future.
  • 9-KG-041 Give examples of contributions of various Canadians to the global community. Include: arts and science.
  • 9-KG-042 Describe Canada’s responsibilities and potential for leadership regarding current global issues. Examples: refugees, international development, environmental stewardship, military defence...
  • 9-VG-013 Value Canada’s contributions to the global community. Examples: humanitarian, artistic, scientific, environmental...

Physical Education/Health Education

Personal and Social Management

  • K.4.S1.A.2a Identify potential career choices in health education and physical education (e.g., physical educator, physiotherapist, athletic director, fitness leader, recreation director, health and wellness educator, social worker, nutritionist, medical doctor, nurse, counsellor, occupational therapist...).

Healthy Lifestyle Practices 

  • K.5.S1.E.1b Describe the potential consequences and risks associated with sexual behaviour (e.g., unplanned pregnancy, STIs, HIV, AIDS...) and different types of contraceptive methods (e.g., abstinence, use of condoms, foam, the pill, diaphragm, intrauterine device...).
  • .5.S1.E.4a Examine behaviours that may decrease the risk of contracting HIV (e.g., practising abstinence, using condoms...) , and behaviours that increase the risk of contracting HIV (e.g., having intercourse with infected persons, using contaminated needles, using or handling body fluids, giving birth once infected...).
  • K.5.S1.E.4b Describe the symptoms of, effects of, and treatments for the most common sexually transmitted infections (e.g., gonorrhea, chlamydia, syphilis, herpes...).

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Manitoba curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Social Studies

Skills

  • S2-S-200 Select information from a variety of oral, visual, material, print, or electronic sources including primary and secondary.
  • S2-S-201 Organize and record information in a variety of formats and reference sources appropriately. Examples: maps, graphs, tables, concept maps...
  • S2-S-203 Construct maps using a variety of information sources and technologies. Examples: observation, traditional knowledge, compass, Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Global Positioning Systems (GPS)...
  • S2-S-204 Select, use, and interpret various types of maps.
  • S2-S-300 Formulate geographic questions to plan inquiry and research.
  • S2-S-302 Draw conclusions and make decisions based on research and various types of evidence.
  • S2-S-303 Reconsider personal assumptions based on new information and ideas.
  • S2-S-304 Analyze physical material and evidence during research.
  • S2-S-305 Compare diverse perspectives and interpretations in the media and other information sources.
  • S2-S-306 Analyze prejudice, racism, stereotyping, and other forms of bias in the media and other information sources.
  • S2-S-307 Propose and defend innovative options or solutions to address issues and problems.
  • S2-S-308 Evaluate information from a variety of sources to determine reliability, validity, authenticity, and perspective. Include: student-gathered data.

Cluster 4 - Industry and Trade

  • S2-KG-039 Define the concept of globalization and identify related social issues.

Physical Education/Health Education

Personal and Social Management 

  • K.4.S2.C.4a Examine the strategies (e.g., deep breathing, relaxation exercises, guided imagery, physical exercises...) and defence mechanisms (e.g., denial, compensation, rationalization, daydreaming, regression...) that can be healthy or unhealthy ways of managing stress.

Healthy Lifestyle Practices

  • K.5.S2.A.2 Demonstrate knowledge of healthy lifestyle practices that contribute to disease/illness prevention, including mental illness/disorders.
  • K.5.S2.E.4a Explain health issues related to HIV/AIDS (e.g., prostitution, intravenous drug use, unsafe sex practices, infection transmitted at birth, use and handling of body fluids...).
  • K.5.S2.E.4b Describe ways to prevent STIs to promote the health of society (e.g., practising abstinence, using condoms, avoiding intercourse with infected victims, requesting blood test for partners, maintaining monogamous relationships...).

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Manitoba curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Biology 11

Unit 1 - Wellness and Homeostasis

  • B11-1-03: Recognize how individual wellness choices affect others. (GLOs: B3, B5) Examples: community, family...
  • B11-1-04: Describe how the body attempts to maintain an internal balance called homeostasis, recognizing that the conditions in which life processes can occur are limited. (GLOs: D1, E2, E3) Include: thermoregulation (maintenance of body temperature), osmoregulation (water balance), and waste management
  • B11-1-05: Explain the principle of negative feedback and identify how the body stabilizes systems against excessive change. (GLOs: D1, E2, E3) Include: role of receptors and effectors

Unit 5: Protection and Control

  • B11-5-01: Describe the body’s defence mechanisms for protection from foreign agents. (GLO: D1) Include: non-specific and specific defences
  • B11-5-02: Describe the body’s response to allergens, vaccines, and viruses/bacteria. (GLO: D1) Include: inflammatory response and immune response
  • B11-5-04: Investigate issues related to the immune system and the protection of public health. (GLOs: B3, C4, C5, C6, C8, D1) Examples: immunization policies, travel bans and advisories, epidemics…
  • B11-5-08: Compare the general roles of nervous and hormonal controls, recognizing that the nervous and endocrine systems interact to maintain homeostasis in the human body. (GLOs: D1, E2, E3) Include: communication, speed, duration, target pathway, and action

Unit 6 - Wellness and Homeostatic Changes

  • B11-6-01: Analyze examples of how different body systems work together to maintain homeostasis under various conditions. (GLOs: D1, E2, E3) Examples: cold weather, organ transplant...
  • B11-6-05: Describe how technology has allowed us to control our wellness, and describe the ethical dilemmas that the use of technology can create. (GLOs: B1, B2, B3, C5, C8) Examples: reproductive technologies, stem-cell research, surgery, anaesthetic, pharmaceuticals...

History of Canada

EQ 11.1.2 (3. Relations with First Peoples)

  • Impact of contact (e.g., cooperation and alliances, conflict, disease, dependence…) 

EQ 11.5.4 - How have Canada’s international relations changed since 1982, and what should its global commitments be for the future?

  • Canada’s participation in United Nations development, peacekeeping, and peace-making initiatives (e.g., General Dallaire in Rwanda; Canadian missions in Central America, Asia, and Middle East; election observers, truce monitors, police trainers; reconstruction; the Ottawa Treaty [Mine Ban Treaty, 1997])
  • What role should Canada play in the world (e.g., defence and protection, world peace, economics and trade, technology and environment; foreign aid and relief, human rights, and social justice...)?
  • Current issues relating to migration, immigration, and refugees

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Manitoba curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Biology 12

Unit 4 - Organizing Biodiversity

  • B12-4-01: Define the concept of biodiversity in terms of ecosystem, species, and genetic diversity. (GLOs: D2, E1)
  • B12-4-02: Explain why it is difficult to determine a definition of species. (GLOs: A1, E1) Examples: hybrids such as mules, phenotypic variations in a species, noninterbreeding subpopulations . . .
  • B12-4-03: Describe the dynamic nature of classification. (GLOs: A1, A2) Include: different systems and current debates
  • B12-4-04: Describe types of evidence used to classify organisms and determine evolutionary relationships. (GLOs: A2, A5) Examples: fossil record, DNA analysis, biochemistry, embryology, morphology . . .
  • B12-4-05: Compare the characteristics of the domains of life. (GLOs: D1, E1) Include: Archaea (Archaebacteria), Bacteria (Eubacteria), and Eukarya
  • B12-4-06: Compare the characteristics of the kingdoms in the Eukarya domain. (GLOs: D1, E1) Include: cell structure, major mode of nutrition, cell number, and motility
  • B12-4-07: Investigate an evolutionary trend in a group of organisms. (GLOs: C2, C5, C6, E1) Examples: hominid evolution, vascularization in plants, animal adaptations for life on land . . .

Global Issues: Citizenship and Sustainability

Health and Biotechnology

  • Exploring the Issues
    • Science, technology, and human health
    • Economic implications of health care
    • Controversial genetic research (embryonic and stem cell research, animal testing, patenting DNA,
    • genetic intervention and modification, preservation of genetic material, genetic information
    • privacy)
    • Epidemic and pandemic prevention and response
    • Disease control (AIDS, virus control, immunization)
    • Food and drug management and testing
    • Alternative health practices, safety, control and marketing, etc
  • Essential Questions
    • How can we be sure that biotechnology practices are safe?

Media

  • Essential Questions
    • How does media influence, affect, and control us?
    • How does media literacy help us to become critical thinkers and responsible citizens?

Peace and Conflict

  • Essential Questions
    • What are the current conflicts in your school? ...community? ...country? ...other countries? What are some ways these could be resolved/transformed?
    • It is estimated that 22 of the 34 countries furthest away from achieving the United Nation’s Millennium Development Goals are affected by current or recent conflicts (United Nations Development Programme). Of the 20 poorest countries, 16 have recently experienced civil war, resulting in severe hunger and poverty. Why do you think this is? How does development relate to conflict? How does this help us understand current conflicts? What might this suggest about peace?

Poverty, Wealth, and Power

  • Exploring the Issues
    • Concentration of wealth
    • Widening gap between rich and poor
    • Economic disparities within and between countries
    • Multinational and transnational corporations
  • Essential Questions
    • What measurable inequalities remain in Canada? Are these avoidable?
    • Are there structural conditions that limit access to resources or limit capabilities?
    • How does the social safety net (e.g., health care) protect Canadians from the worst impacts of structural inequities?
    • How has modern technology increased education and wealth gaps? How has it narrowed them? How has life changed in Canada over the last century?
    • Why is life expectancy generally higher in “wealthier” countries?
    • How are we connected to other places on the planet?
    • How can globalization improve people’s well-being? How might it affect people negatively? Why is there this backlash against globalization, which is supposed to generate peace and prosperity?

Social Justice and Human Rights

  • Suggested Issues
    • economic disparities, poverty, quality of life
    • access to food, water, health care, education, employment
    • NGOs and international collaboration, role of governments in international aid (e.g. CIDA, disaster relief, the economics of aid)

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

Last modified: 
Sep 14, 2020