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BC Resource Guide

Kids Boost Immunity matches the BC curriculum outcomes listed below. You can also read a description of the core lessons available for BC students. Each grade has a tailored selection of lessons that fit their curricular need. Please note that this is not an exhaustive list of the curricular fit - teachers on KBI have found many more curriculum connections than outlined here! Continue scrolling down to see a short description of the core lessons available for each grade.

 

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the BC curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Social Studies

Big Ideas: 

Interactions between First Peoples and Europeans lead to conflict and cooperation, which continues to shape Canada’s identity.

Curricular Competencies:

Use Social Studies inquiry processes and skills to ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze ideas; and communicate findings and decisions

  • Compare information and viewpoints about a selected problem or issue Identify patterns in information, and use those patterns to draw inferences
  • Summarize information and opinions about a selected problem or issue Use grids, scales, and legends on maps and timelines to interpret or represent specific information
  • Translate information from maps to other forms of communication and vice versa (e.g., write a paragraph describing what you see in a map, create a map based on an image or oral description)
  • Give reasons for using more than one source of information (e.g., differing points of view, currency of information, level of detail, reliability)
  • Apply a variety of strategies for information gathering (e.g., headings, indices, Internet searches)
  • Apply strategies for note taking and organizing information gathered from a variety of information sources Identify problems or issues that are local, national, and/or global in focus

Content:

Demographic changes in pre-Confederation British Columbia in both First Peoples and non-First Peoples communities

  • Sample topics:
    • Disease

The impact of colonization on First Peoples societies in British Columbia and Canada

  • Sample topics:
    • Disease and demographics
    • More complex political systems
    • Impact on language and culture
    • Key events and issues regarding First Peoples rights and interactions with early governments in Canada (e.g., the Indian Act, potlatch  ban, reserve system, residential schools, treaties)

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the BC curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Social Studies

Big Ideas: 

Canadian institutions and government reflect the challenge of our regional diversity.

Curricular Competencies:

Use Social Studies inquiry processes and skills to — ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze ideas; and communicate findings and decisions

  • Key skills:
    • State a hypothesis about a selected problem or issue
    • Use inference, imagination, and pattern identification to clarify and define a problem or issue
    • Compare a range of points of view on an issue
    • Summarize information and viewpoints about a problem or issue
    • Use latitude, longitude, and intermediate directions to locate major geographic features in BC and Canada
    • Describe a selected place in Canada using both absolute and relative location
    • Use keys and legends to interpret maps (e.g., resources, economic activities, transportation routes, capital cities, population)
    • Recognize that different types of maps represent particular types of information (e.g., thematic maps show information such as resource distribution; topographic maps show elevation; political maps show provincial boundaries)
    • Apply established criteria to compare information sources (e.g., relevance, accuracy, authorship)
    • Identify opportunities for civic participation at the school, community, provincial, and national levels

Ask questions, corroborate inferences, and draw conclusions about the content and origins of a variety of sources, including mass media (evidence)

Differentiate between intended and unintended consequences of events, decisions, and developments, and speculate about alternative outcomes (cause and consequence)

Make ethical judgments about events, decisions, or actions that consider the conditions of a particular time and place, and assess appropriate ways to respond

  • Sample topics:
    • Indian Act
    • Residential school system

Content:

Levels of government (First Peoples, federal, provincial, and municipal), their main functions, and sources of funding

Sample activities:

  • Distinguish between the different levels of government in Canada: municipal, provincial, territorial, federal
  • Summarize the responsibilities of government (e.g., providing and administering services, making laws, collecting and allocating taxes)

Sample topics:

  • Key roles within provincial, territorial, and federal governments in Canada (e.g., premier, prime minister, MLA, MP, speaker, lieutenant governor, governor general; cabinet, senate, government ministries)
  • Elected and appointed provincial and federal government leaders in Canada (e.g., local MLA and MP, local First Nations leaders, premier of BC, the lieutenant governor of BC, prime minister, governor general)

Key question:

  • Which level of government has the most effect on your daily life?

Participation and representation in Canada’s system of government



BC Physical & Health Education

Big Ideas: 

Understanding ourselves and the various aspects of health helps us develop a balanced lifestyle.

Curricular Competencies:

Healthy and Active Living

  • Describe strategies for communicating medical concerns and getting help with health issues
  • Identify, apply, and reflect on strategies used to pursue personal healthy-living goals

Content:

Practices that promote health and well-being, including those that use communicable disease prevention such as:

  • Hand washing
  • Covering mouth when coughing
  • Washing hands after sneezing and/or coughing
  • Staying away from others when sick

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the BC curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Science

Big Ideas: 

Multicellular organisms rely on internal systems to survive, reproduce, and interact with their environment

 

Curricular Competencies:

Questioning and predicting

  • Demonstrate a sustained curiosity about a scientific topic or problem of personal interest
  • Make observations in familiar or unfamiliar contexts
  • Identify questions to answer or problems to solve through scientific inquiry
  • Make predictions about the findings of their inquiry

Planning and Conducting

  • With support, plan appropriate investigations to answer their questions or solve problems they have identified
  • Decide which variable should be changed and measured for a fair test
  • Choose appropriate data to collect to answer their questions
  • Observe, measure, and record data, using appropriate tools, including digital technologies

Processing and analyzing data and information

  • Identify First Peoples perspectives and knowledge as sources of information
  • Construct and use a variety of methods, including tables, graphs, and digital technologies, as appropriate, to represent patterns or relationships in data
  • Identify patterns and connections in data
  • Compare data with predictions and develop explanations for results
  • Demonstrate an openness to new ideas and consideration of alternatives

Evaluating

  • Evaluate whether their investigations were fair tests
  • Identify possible sources of error
  • Suggest improvements to their investigation methods
  • Identify some of the assumptions in secondary sources
  • Demonstrate an understanding and appreciation of evidence

Applying and Innovating

  • Generate and introduce new or refined ideas when problem solving

 

Content:

The basic structures and functions of the body


Social Studies

Big Ideas: 

Economic self-interest can be a significant cause of conflict among peoples and governments

Complex global problems require international cooperation to make difficult choices for the future

Systems of government vary in their respect for human rights and freedoms.

Media sources can both positively and negatively affect our understanding of important events and issues

 

Curricular Competencies:

Use Social Studies inquiry processes and skills to - ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze ideas; and communicate findings and decisions

Key skills:

  • With teacher and peer support, select a relevant problem or issue for inquiry
  • Use comparing, classifying, inferring, imagining, verifying, identifying relationships, and summarizing to clarify and define a problem or issue
  • Draw conclusions about a problem or issue
  • Locate and map continents, oceans, and seas using simple grids, scales, and legends
  • Locate the prime meridian, equator, Tropic of Cancer, Tropic of Capricorn, Arctic Circle, and Antarctic Circle on a globe or map of the world
  • Recognize the relationship between time zones and lines of longitude
  • Compare how graphs, tables, aerial photos, and maps represent information
  • Represent the same information in two or more graphic forms (e.g., graphs, tables, thematic maps)
  • Draw conclusions from collected information
  • Select ways to clarify a specific problem or issue (e.g., discussion, debate, research)
  • Identify opportunities for civic participation at the school, community, provincial, national, and global levels
  • Individually, or in groups, implement a plan of action to address a problem or issue (e.g., fundraising campaign, clothing or food drive, letter writing to a politician, editorial in the school or community newspaper, petition)

Develop a plan of action to address a selected problem or issue

  • Individually, or in groups, implement a plan of action to address a problem or issue (e.g., fundraising campaign, clothing or food drive, letter writing to a politician, editorial in the school or community newspaper, petition).

Develop a plan of action to address a selected problem or issue

  • Individually, or in groups, implement a plan of action to address a problem or issue (e.g., fundraising campaign, clothing or food drive, letter writing to a politician, editorial in the school or community newspaper, petition).

Ask questions, corroborate inferences, and draw conclusions about the content and origins of a variety of sources, including mass media

Sample activities:

  • Compare a range of points of view on a problem or issue
  • Compare and contrast media coverage of a controversial issue (e.g., climate change, resource management)
  • With peer and teacher support, determine criteria for evaluating information sources for credibility and reliability (e.g., context, authentic voice, source, objectivity, evidence, authorship)
  • Apply criteria to evaluate selected sources for credibility and reliability
  • Distinguish between primary sources and secondary sources

Differentiate between short- and long-term causes, and intended and unintended consequences, of events, decisions, or developments

Sample activities:

  • Explain the historical basis of selected contemporary issues
  • Give examples of how your actions may have consequences for others locally or globally (e.g., effect of consumer choices)

Make ethical judgments about events, decisions, or actions that consider the conditions of a particular time and place, and assess appropriate ways to respond

Key questions:

  • What are the rights and responsibilities of a global citizen?

 

Content:

The urbanization and migration of people

Key questions:

  • Why do the majority of people in the world now live in urban centres?
  • What are the advantages and disadvantages of urbanization?

Global poverty and inequality issues including class structure and gender

Sample Topics:

  • Treatment of minority populations in Canada and in other cultures and societies you have studied (e.g., segregation, assimilation, integration, and pluralism;  multiculturalism policies; settlement patterns; residential schools, South African Apartheid, the Holocaust, internment of Japanese-Canadians, Head Tax on Chinese immigrants; caste and class systems)
  • Unequal distribution of wealth
  • Corruption
  • Lack of judicial process
  • Treatment of indigenous people
  • Infant mortality
  • Social justice

Roles of individuals, governmental organizations, and NGOs, including groups representing indigenous peoples

Sample topics:

  • United Nations
  • International aid
  • Activists
  • International aid groups (e.g., Medecins sans Frontieres [Doctors without Borders])
  • Private foundations (Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation)

Different systems of government

Sample activity:

  • Components of government (House of Commons, House of Lords, senate, province, state, prefecture, canton)
  • Electoral processes (e.g., political parties, voting, representation)

International cooperation and responses to global issues

Sample topics:

  • Environmental issues
  • Epidemic/pandemic response

Regional and international conflict

Sample topics:

  • War
  • Genocide
  • Boundary disputes
  • Religious and ethnic violence
  • Terrorism

Media technologies and coverage of current events

Sample topics:

  • Ownership of media
  • Propaganda
  • Editorial bias
  • Sensationalism
  • Social media uses and abuses

Key questions:

  • How does the media influence public perception of major events?
  • Are some media sources more trustworthy than others? Explain your answer.

 


BC Physical & Health Education

Big Ideas: 

Healthy choices influence our physical, emotional, and mental well-being.

 

Curricular Competencies:

Healthy and Active Living

  • Analyze health messages and possible intentions to influence behaviour

Social and Community Health

  • Explore strategies for promoting the health and well-being of the school and community

 

Content:

Identify, apply, and reflect on strategies used to pursue personal healthy-living goals. Sources of health information, such as:

  • Magazines
  • Internet
  • Advertisements on TV
  • Flyers from health stores

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade



All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the BC curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Science

Big Ideas: 

Earth and its climate have changed over geological time

 

Curricular Competencies:

Questioning and predicting

  • Demonstrate a sustained curiosity about a scientific topic or problem of personal interest
  • Make observations in familiar or unfamiliar contexts
  • Identify questions to answer or problems to solve through scientific inquiry
  • Formulate alternative “If…then…” hypotheses based on their questions
  • Make predictions about the findings of their inquiry

Planning and Conducting

  • Collaboratively plan a range of investigation types, including field work and experiments, to answer their questions or solve problems they have identified
  • Measure and control variables (dependent and independent) through fair tests

Processing and analyzing data and information

  • Experience and interpret the local environment
  • Apply First Peoples perspectives and knowledge, other ways of knowing, and local knowledge as sources of information
  • Construct and use a range of methods to represent patterns or relationships in data, including tables, graphs, keys, models, and digital technologies as appropriate
  • Seek patterns and connections in data from their own investigations and secondary sources
  • Use scientific understandings to identify relationships and draw conclusions

Evaluating

  • Reflect on their investigation methods, including the adequacy of controls on variables (dependent and independent) and the quality of the data collected
  • Identify possible sources of error and suggest improvements to their investigation methods
  • Demonstrate an awareness of assumptions and bias in their own work and secondary sources
  • Demonstrate an understanding and appreciation of evidence (qualitative and quantitative)
  • Exercise a healthy, informed skepticism and use scientific knowledge and findings from their own investigations to evaluate claims in secondary sources
  • Consider social, ethical, and environmental implications of the findings from their own and others’ investigations

Applying and Innovating

  • Contribute to care for self, others, community, and world through personal or collaborative approaches
  • Generate and introduce new or refined ideas when problem solving

Communicating

  • Communicate ideas, findings, and solutions to problems, using scientific language, representations, and digital technologies as appropriate
  • Express and reflect on a variety of experiences and perspectives of place

 

Content:

First Peoples knowledge of changes in biodiversity over time

Evidence of climate change over geological time and the recent impacts of humans


Social Studies

Big Ideas: 

Geographic conditions shaped the emergence of civilizations.

Increasingly complex societies required new systems of laws and government.

Economic specialization and trade networks can lead to conflict and cooperation between societies.

 

Curricular Competencies:

Use Social Studies inquiry processes and skills to — ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze ideas; and communicate findings and decisions

Key skills:

  • Select a relevant problem or issue for inquiry.
  • Use comparison, classification, inference, imagination, verification, and analogy to clarify and define a problem or issue.
  • Compare the advantages and disadvantages of various graphic forms of communication (e.g., graphs, tables, charts, maps, photographs, sketches).
  • Demonstrate an ability to interpret scales and legends in graphs, tables, and maps (e.g., climograph, topographical map, pie chart).
  • Compare maps of early civilizations with modern maps of the same area.
  • Select an appropriate graphic form of communication for a specific purpose (e.g., a timeline to show a sequence of events, a map to show location).
  • Represent information fairly and cite sources consistently.
  • Select appropriate forms of presentation suitable for the purpose and audience (e.g., multimedia, oral presentation, song, dramatic performance, written presentation).
  • Demonstrate debating skills, including identifying, discussing, defining, and clarifying a problem, issue, or inquiry.

Assess the credibility of multiple sources and the adequacy of evidence used to justify conclusions

Sample activities:

  • Compare the advantages and disadvantages of specific types of sources for specific purposes (e.g., primary and secondary sources; print, video, electronic, graphic sources; artifacts).
  • Compare information-gathering methodologies (e.g., primary research using surveys, archeological excavation, interviews; research using secondary sources; testing of hypotheses).
  • Apply criteria to evaluate information and information sources (e.g., assess bias, reliability, authorship, currency, audience; confirm value using multiple sources).

 

Content:

Interactions and exchanges between past civilizations and cultures, including conflict, peace, trade, expansion, and migration

Social, political, legal, governmental, and economic systems and structures, including at least one indigenous to the Americas

Sample activities:

  • List and describe aspects of current Canadian laws and government structures that have evolved from ancient civilizations (e.g., rule of law, democracy, senate, representation)

BC Physical & Health Education

Big Ideas: 

Healthy choices influence our physical, emotional, and mental well-being.

 

Curricular Competencies:

Healthy and Active Living

  • Identify factors that influence healthy choices and explain their potential health effects
  • Assess and communicate health information for various health issues
  • Reflect on outcomes of personal healthy-living goals and assess strategies used

Social & Community Health

  • Explore strategies for promoting the health and well-being of the school and community

 

Content:

Practices that reduce the risk of life-threatening communicable diseases, include:

  • Hepatitis B and C
  • Meningococcal C

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the BC curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Science

Big Ideas

Life processes are performed at the cellular level.

 

Curricular Competencies

Questioning and Predicting

  • Demonstrate a sustained intellectual curiosity about a scientific topic or problem of personal interest
  • Make observations aimed at identifying their own questions about the natural world
  • Identify a question to answer or a problem to solve through scientific inquiry
  • Formulate alternative “If…then…” hypotheses based on their questions
  • Make predictions about the findings of their inquiry

Planning and conducting

  • Collaboratively plan a range of investigation types, including field work and experiments, to answer their questions or solve problems they have identified
  • Measure and control variables (dependent and independent) through fair tests

Processing and analyzing data and information

  • Apply First Peoples perspectives and knowledge, other ways of knowing, and local knowledge as sources of information
  • Construct and use a range of methods to represent patterns or relationships in data, including tables, graphs, keys, models, and digital technologies as appropriate
  • Seek patterns and connections in data from their own investigations and secondary sources
  • Use scientific understandings to identify relationships and draw conclusions

Evaluating

  • Reflect on their investigation methods, including the adequacy of controls on variables (dependent and independent) and the quality of the data collected
  • Identify possible sources of error and suggest improvements to their investigation methods
  • Demonstrate an awareness of assumptions and bias in their own work and secondary sources
  • Demonstrate an understanding and appreciation of evidence (qualitative and quantitative)
  • Exercise a healthy, informed skepticism and use scientific knowledge and findings from their own investigations to evaluate claims in secondary sources
  • Consider social, ethical, and environmental implications of the findings from their own and others’ investigations

Applying and innovating

  • Contribute to care for self, others, community, and world through personal or collaborative approaches
  • Transfer and apply learning to new situations
  • Generate and introduce new or refined ideas when problem solving

Communicating

  • Communicate ideas, findings, and solutions to problems, using scientific language, representations, and digital technologies as appropriate
  • Express and reflect on a variety of experiences and perspectives of place

 

Content

Characteristics of Life

  • Living things respire, grow, take in nutrients, produce waste, respond to stimuli, and reproduce; there is debate as to whether or not to classify viruses as living things 

Cell theory and types of cells

  • Living things are made of one or more cells
  • All cells come from pre-existing cells
  • The cell is a basic unit of life
  • Prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells
  • Cells contain structures that carry out essential functions

The relationship of micro-organisms with living things: 

  • Basic functions of the immune system
    • The immune system provides a barrier to infections and a number of non-specific and specific responses to fight infection (e.g., fever, antibodies, phagocytes, inflammation)
    • Different populations have greater immunity to certain infections than other populations (e.g., impact of smallpox epidemic on First Peoples)
  • Vaccination and antibiotics
    • Vaccination can prevent the spread of infectious disease 
    • Antibiotics are effective only against living organisms, such as bacteria, and not against viruses; overuse of antibiotics can lead to the development of antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria (“superbugs”) 
  • Impacts of epidemics and pandemics on human populations
    • Regional outbreaks (e.g., smallpox, measles) 
    • Global outbreaks (e.g., Spanish flu, SARS) 

Social Studies

Big Ideas

Contacts and conflicts between peoples stimulated significant cultural, social, political change.

Human and environmental factors shape changes in population and living standards.

Exploration, expansion, and colonization had varying consequences for different groups.

 

Curricular Competencies

Use Social Studies inquiry processes and skills to ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze ideas; and communicate findings and decisions

  • Key skills:
    • Select a relevant problem or issue for inquiry.
    • Use comparison, classification, inference, imagination, verification, and analogy to clarify and define a problem or issue.
    • Compare the advantages and disadvantages of various graphic forms of communication (e.g., graphs, tables, charts, maps, photographs, sketches).
    • Demonstrate an ability to interpret scales and legends in graphs, tables, and maps (e.g., climograph, topographical map, pie chart).
    • Select an appropriate graphic form of communication for a specific purpose (e.g., a timeline to show a sequence of events, a map to show location).
    • Represent information fairly and cite sources consistently.
    • Select appropriate forms of presentation suitable for the purpose and audience (e.g., multimedia, oral presentation, song, dramatic performance, written presentation).
    • Demonstrate debating skills, including identifying, discussing, defining, and clarifying a problem, issue, or inquiry.

Identify what the creators of accounts, narratives, maps, or texts have determined is significant

Assess the credibility of multiple sources and the adequacy of evidence used to justify conclusions

  • Sample activities:
    • Distinguish between primary and secondary sources.
    • Assess the accuracy of sources (e.g., consider when they were created, recognize ambiguity and vagueness, distinguish conclusions from supporting statements, analyze logic or consistency of conclusions in terms of evidence provided).
    • Identify biases that influence documents (e.g., articulate different points of view, such as a landholder’s or tenant’s, on topics or issues; identify authors’ motives and describe how that could affect their reliability as a source; determine whether sources reflect single or multiple points of view).
    • Locate and use relevant data.
    • Evaluate the value of literature from this period (e.g., Canterbury Tales, The Tale of Genji) as a historical record.

Determine which causes most influenced particular decisions, actions, or events, and assess their short-and long-term consequences

  • Sample activity:
    • Analyze whether an event was caused by underlying systemic factors (e.g., social unrest, economic decline) or by an unpredictable event (e.g., disease, natural disaster).
  • Key questions:
    • What would have been the impacts if the indigenous peoples of the Americas had been immune to smallpox and other diseases?

Explain different perspectives on past or present people, places, issues, or events, and compare the values, worldviews, and beliefs of human cultures and societies in different times and places

  • Sample activities:
    • Gather and evaluate sources that provide information about perspectives on past or present people, places, issues, or events during a particular period of history.
    • Compare the level of respect for the natural environment in different societies.

Make ethical judgments about past events, decisions, or actions, and assess the limitations of drawing direct lessons from the past

  • Key questions:
    • How are different groups represented in various cultural narratives?

 

Content

Social, political, and economic systems and structures, including those of at least one indigenous civilization

Interactions and exchanges of resources, ideas, arts, and culture between and among different civilizations

Exploration, expansion, and colonization

  •         Sample topics:
    • Contact  and conflict
    • The Americas
    • State formation and collapse   

Changes in population and living standards

  • Sample topics:
    • Forced and unforced migration and movement of people
    • Diseases and health
    • Urbanization and the effect of expanding communities

Physical & Health Education

Big Ideas

Healthy choices influence our physical, emotional, and mental well-being.

Advocating for the health and well-being of others connects us to our community.by climate change), etc.


Curricular Competencies

Healthy and Active Living

  • Identify factors that influence healthy choices and explain their potential health effects
  • Assess and communicate health information for various health issues
  • Reflect on outcomes of personal healthy-living goals and assess strategies used

Social and Community Health

  • Explore strategies for promoting the health and well-being of the school and community

 

Content

Potential short- and long-term consequences of health decisions, including those involving nutrition, protection from
sexually transmitted infections, and sleep routines

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the BC curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Science

Curricular Competencies

Questioning and predicting

  • Demonstrate a sustained intellectual curiosity about a scientific topic or problem of personal interest
  • Make observations aimed at identifying their own questions, including increasingly complex ones, about the natural world
  • Formulate multiple hypotheses and predict multiple outcomes

Planning and conducting

  • Collaboratively and individually plan, select, and use appropriate investigation methods, including field work and lab experiments, to collect reliable data (qualitative and quantitative)

Processing and analyzing data and information

  • Experience and interpret the local environment
  • Apply First Peoples perspectives and knowledge, other ways of knowing, and local knowledge as sources of information
  • Seek and analyze patterns, trends, and connections in data, including describing relationships between variables (dependent and independent) and identifying inconsistencies
  • Construct, analyze and interpret graphs (including interpolation and extrapolation), models and/or diagrams
  • Use knowledge of scientific concepts to draw conclusions that are consistent with evidence
  • Analyze cause-and-effect relationships

Evaluating

  • Evaluate their methods and experimental conditions, including identifying sources of error or uncertainty, confounding variables, and possible alternative explanations and conclusions
  • Describe specific ways to improve their investigation methods and the quality of the data
  • Evaluate the validity and limitations of a model or analogy in relation to the phenomenon modelled
  • Demonstrate an awareness of assumptions, question information given, and identify bias in their own work and secondary sources
  • Connect scientific explorations to careers in science
  • Exercise a healthy, informed skepticism, and use scientific knowledge and findings to form their own investigations and to evaluate claims in secondary sources
  • Critically analyze the validity of information in secondary sources and evaluate the approaches used to solve problems

Applying and innovating

  • Contribute to care for self, others, community, and world through individual or collaborative approaches
  • Transfer and apply learning to new situations
  • Generate and introduce new or refined ideas when problem solving
  • Contribute to finding solutions to problems at a local and/or global level through inquiry
  • Consider the role of scientists in innovation

Communicating

  • Formulate physical or mental theoretical models to describe a phenomenon
  • Communicate scientific ideas, claims, information, and perhaps a suggested course of action, for a specific purpose and audience, constructing evidence-based arguments and using appropriate scientific language, conventions, and representations
  • Express and reflect on a variety of experiences, perspectives, and worldviews through place

Social Studies

Big Ideas

The physical environment influences the nature of political, social, and economic change.

Disparities in power alter the balance of relationships between individuals and between societies.

 

Curricular Competencies

Use Social Studies inquiry processes and skills to ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze ideas; and communicate findings and decisions

  • Key skills:
    • Draw conclusions about a problem, an issue, or a topic.
    • Assess and defend a variety of positions on a problem, an issue, or a topic.
    • Identify and clarify a problem or issue.
    • Evaluate and organize collected data (e.g., in outlines, summaries, notes, timelines, charts).
    • Interpret information and data from a variety of maps, graphs, and tables.
    • Interpret and present data in a variety of forms (e.g., oral, written, and graphic).
    • Accurately cite sources.
    • Construct graphs, tables, and maps to communicate ideas and information, demonstrating appropriate use of grids, scales, legends, and contours.

Assess the justification for competing historical accounts after investigating points of contention, reliability of sources, and adequacy of evidence

  • Sample activities:
    • Assess information sources for selected topics in terms of bias and point of view.
  • Key questions:
    • What evidence is there that imperialism and colonialism still influence present-day relationships between countries and groups?

Compare and contrast continuities and changes for different groups at the same time period

  • Key questions:
    • In what ways has the colonization of Canada made life better or worse? And for whom?

Assess how prevailing conditions and the actions of individuals or groups affect events, decisions, or developments

  • Sample activities:
    • Make connections between events and their causes, consequences, and implications.

Explain and infer different perspectives on past or present people, places, issues, or events by considering prevailing norms, values, worldviews, and beliefs

  • Sample activities:
    • Examine primary sources (e.g., photographs, newspaper articles, cartoons, speeches) and evaluate what these sources reveal about the worldview and beliefs of the author.

 

Content:

The continuing effects of imperialism and colonialism on indigenous peoples in Canada and around the world

  • Sample topics:
    • Impact of the Indian Act, including reservations and the residential school system
    • Interactions between Europeans and First Peoples
  • Key questions:
    • What role does imperialism and colonialism from this period have on events in present-day Canada and around the world?

Global demographic shifts, including patterns of migration and population growth

  • Sample topics:
    • Disease, poverty, famine, and the search for land

Local, regional, and global conflicts


Physical & Health Education

Big Ideas

Advocating for the health and well-being of others connects us to our community

 

Curricular Competencies

Healthy and Active Living

  • Identify factors that influence health messages from a variety of sources, and analyze their influence on behaviour
  • Identify and apply strategies to pursue personal healthy-living goals
  • Reflect on outcomes of personal healthy-living goals and assess strategies used

Social and Community Health

  • Create strategies for promoting the health and well-being of the school and community

 

Content

Potential short- and long-term consequences of health decisions, including those involving nutrition, protection from
sexually transmitted infections, and sleep routines

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade



All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the BC curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Science

Curricular Comeptencies

Questioning and predicting

  • Demonstrate a sustained intellectual curiosity about a scientific topic or problem of personal interest
  • Make observations aimed at identifying their own questions, including increasingly complex ones, about the natural world
  • Formulate multiple hypotheses and predict multiple outcomes

Planning and conducting

  • Collaboratively and individually plan, select, and use appropriate investigation methods, including field work and lab experiments, to collect reliable data (qualitative and quantitative)
     

Processing and analyzing data and information

  • Apply First Peoples perspectives and knowledge, other ways of knowing, and local knowledge as sources of information
  • Seek and analyze patterns, trends, and connections in data, including describing relationships between variables (dependent and independent) and identifying inconsistencies
  • Construct, analyze, and interpret graphs (including interpolation and extrapolation), models, and/or diagrams
  • Use knowledge of scientific concepts to draw conclusions that are consistent with evidence
  • Analyze cause-and-effect relationships

Evaluating

  • Evaluate their methods and experimental conditions, including identifying sources of error or uncertainty, confounding variables, and possible alternative explanations and conclusions
  • Describe specific ways to improve their investigation methods and the quality of the data
  • Evaluate the validity and limitations of a model or analogy in relation to the phenomenon modelled
  • Demonstrate an awareness of assumptions, question information given, and identify bias in their own work and secondary sources
  • Connect scientific explorations to careers in science
  • Exercise a healthy, informed skepticism and use scientific knowledge and findings to form their own investigations and to evaluate claims in secondary sources
  • Critically analyze the validity of information in secondary sources and evaluate the approaches used to solve problems

Applying and innovating

  • Contribute to care for self, others, community, and world through individual or collaborative approaches
  • Transfer and apply learning to new situations
  • Generate and introduce new or refined ideas when problem solving
  • Contribute to finding solutions to problems at a local and/or global level through inquiry
  • Consider the role of scientists in innovation

Communicating

  • Formulate physical or mental theoretical models to describe a phenomenon
  • Communicate scientific ideas, claims, information, and perhaps a suggested course of action, for a specific purpose and audience, constructing evidence-based arguments and using appropriate scientific language, conventions, and representations
  • Express and reflect on a variety of experiences, perspectives, and worldviews through place

Social Studies

Big Ideas

Global and regional conflicts have been a powerful force in shaping our contemporary world and identities.

 

Curricular Competencies

Use Social Studies inquiry processes and skills to ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze ideas and data; and communicate findings and decisions

  • Key skills:
    • Draw conclusions about a problem, an issue, or a topic.
    • Assess and defend a variety of positions on a problem, an issue, or a topic.
    • Demonstrate leadership by planning, implementing, and assessing strategies to address a problem or an issue.
    • Identify and clarify a problem or issue.
    • Evaluate and organize collected data (e.g., in outlines, summaries, notes, timelines, charts).
    • Interpret information and data from a variety of maps, graphs, and tables.
    • Interpret and present data in a variety of forms (e.g., oral, written, and graphic).
    • Accurately cite sources.
    • Construct graphs, tables, and maps to communicate ideas and information, demonstrating appropriate use of grids, scales, legends, and contours.

Assess the significance of people, places, events, or developments, and compare varying perspectives on their significance at particular times and places, and from group to group

  • Key questions:
    • How relevant is Canadian content in a global digital world?

Assess the justification for competing accounts after investigating points of contention, reliability of sources, and adequacy of evidence, including data

 

Content

Government, First Peoples governance, political institutions, and ideologies

  • Levels and branches of government:
    • Local, regional, territorial, provincial, federal
    • Executive, legislative, judicial

Environmental, political, and economic policies

  • Sample Topics
    • Stakeholders (e.g., First Peoples; industry and corporate leaders; local citizens; grassroots movements; special interest groups, including environmental organizations)

Canadian autonomy

  • Sample topics
    • Canada and the world (e.g., League of Nations, World War II, United Nations, Paris Climate Agreement)

International conflicts and co-operation

  • Sample topics:
    • Global armed conflicts and Canada’s role in them (e.g., World War II, Korea, Suez, Cyprus, Gulf War, Somalia, Rwanda, Yugoslavia, Afghanistan, Syria)
    • Non-participation in global armed conflicts (e.g., Chanak Crisis, Vietnam War, Iraq War)
    • Involvement in international organizations and agreements, including League of Nations, United Nations, La Francophonie, Commonwealth, NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization), Group of Seven (G7), NORAD (North American Aerospace Defense Command), APEC (Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation), WTO (World Trade Organization), Paris Climate Agreement, Great Lakes–Saint Lawrence River Basin Sustainable Water Resources Agreement, Ottawa Treaty
    • Support of non-governmental organizations (NGOs)

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the BC curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Science

Big Ideas

Life is a result of interactions at the molecular and cellular levels.

Organisms are grouped based on common characteristics.

 

Curricular Competencies

Questioning and predicting

  • Demonstrate a sustained intellectual curiosity about a scientific topic or problem of personal, local, or global interest
  • Make observations aimed at identifying their own questions, including increasingly abstract ones, about the natural world
  • Formulate multiple hypotheses and predict multiple outcomes

Planning and conducting

  • Collaboratively and individually plan, select, and use appropriate investigation methods, including field work and lab experiments, to collect reliable data (qualitative and quantitative)

Processing and analyzing data and information

  • Experience and interpret the local environment
  • Apply First Peoples perspectives and knowledge, other ways of knowing, and local knowledge as sources of information
  • Seek and analyze patterns, trends, and connections in data, including describing relationships between variables, performing calculations, and identifying inconsistencies
  • Construct, analyze, and interpret graphs, models, and/or diagrams
  • Use knowledge of scientific concepts to draw conclusions that are consistent with evidence
  • Analyze cause-and-effect relationships

Evaluating

  • Evaluate their methods and experimental conditions, including identifying sources of error or uncertainty, confounding variables, and possible alternative explanations and conclusions
  • Describe specific ways to improve their investigation methods and the quality of their data
  • Evaluate the validity and limitations of a model or analogy in relation to the phenomenon modelled
  • Demonstrate an awareness of assumptions, question information given, and identify bias in their own work and in primary and secondary sources
  • Connect scientific explorations to careers in science
  • Exercise a healthy, informed skepticism and use scientific knowledge and findings to form their own investigations to evaluate claims in primary and secondary sources
  • Critically analyze the validity of information in primary and secondary sources and evaluate the approaches used to solve problems

Applying and innovating

  • Contribute to care for self, others, community, and world through individual or collaborative approaches
  • Cooperatively design projects with local and/or global connections and applications
  • Contribute to finding solutions to problems at a local and/or global level through inquiry
  • Implement multiple strategies to solve problems in real-life, applied, and conceptual situations
  • Consider the role of scientists in innovation

Communicating

  • Formulate physical or mental theoretical models to describe a phenomenon
  • Communicate scientific ideas and information, and perhaps a suggested course of action, for a specific purpose and audience, constructing evidence-based arguments and using appropriate scientific language, conventions, and representations
  • Express and reflect on a variety of experiences, perspectives, and worldviews through place

 

Content

Levels of organization

  • Molecular, cellular, tissue, organ, organ system, organism, population, community, ecosystem 

Cell structure and function

  • Prokaryotic and eukaryotic
  • Unicellular and multicellular
  • Cell specialization

Energy transformations in Cells

  • Cellular respiration: glucose broken down in the presence of water yields energy (ATP) and carbon dioxide
  • Photosynthesis: consumes carbon dioxide and water, produces oxygen and sugars

Viruses

  • At the boundary of living and non-living
  • Lytic and lysogenic cycles
  • Viral disease: immunity, vaccines, herd immunity, reducing the spread of viral diseases (e.g., H1N1, avian flu, HIV, Ebola, STIs)

Single-celled and multi-celled organisms

  • Prokaryotic and eukaryotic
  • Aerobic and anaerobic

Taxonomic principles for classifying organisms

  • Taxa: kingdom, phylum, class, order, family, genus, species
  • Phylogenetic tree (cladogram)
  • Dichotomous key

Binomial nomenclature

Similarities and differences between domains and kingdoms

  • Unifying criteria for classification
  • Hierarchical nature of diversity
  • Changing models based on emerging knowledge

Social Studies

Big Ideas

Physical features and natural resources influence demographic patterns and population distribution (adapted from Human Geography 12).

Understanding how political decisions are made is critical to being an informed and engaged citizen (from Political Studies 12).

Indigenous peoples are reclaiming mental, emotional, physical, and spiritual well-being despite the continuing effects of colonialism (from Contemporary Indigenous Studies 12).

Social justice initiatives can transform individuals and systems (from Social Justice 12).

Decision making in urban and regional planning requires balancing political, economic, social, and environmental factors (from Urban Studies 12).

 

Curricular Competencies

Use Social Studies inquiry processes and skills to ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze ideas; and communicate findings and decisions

Assess the credibility and justifiability of evidence, data, and interpretations (evidence)

 

Content

Colonialism and contemporary issues for indigenous people in Canada and around the world (adapted from Contemporary Indigenous Studies 12)

Current issues in local, regional, national, or global politics as represented in mass media (adapted from Political Studies 12)

Methods used by individuals, groups, and organizations to promote social justice (adapted from Social Justice 12)

Recognition of and responses to genocide (from Genocide Studies 12)

Global issues in urbanization (adapted from Urban Studies 12)

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the BC curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Science

Anatomy and Physiology 12

Big Ideas

Homeostasis is maintained through physiological processes.

Organ systems have complex interrelationships to maintain homeostasis.

 

Curricular Competencies

Questioning and predicting

  • Demonstrate a sustained intellectual curiosity about a scientific topic or problem of personal, local, or global interest
  • Make observations aimed at identifying their own questions, including increasingly abstract ones, about the natural world
  • Formulate multiple hypotheses and predict multiple outcomes

Planning and conducting

  • Collaboratively and individually plan, select, and use appropriate investigation methods, including field work and lab experiments, to collect reliable data (qualitative and quantitative)

Processing and analyzing data and information

  • Experience and interpret the local environment
  • Apply First Peoples perspectives and knowledge, other ways of knowing, and local knowledge as sources of information
  • Seek and analyze patterns, trends, and connections in data, including describing relationships between variables, performing calculations, and identifying inconsistencies
  • Construct, analyze, and interpret graphs, models, and/or diagrams
  • Use knowledge of scientific concepts to draw conclusions that are consistent with evidence
  • Analyze cause-and-effect relationships

Evaluating

  • Evaluate their methods and experimental conditions, including identifying sources of error or uncertainty, confounding variables, and possible alternative explanations and conclusions
  • Describe specific ways to improve their investigation methods and the quality of their data
  • Evaluate the validity and limitations of a model or analogy in relation to the phenomenon modelled
  • Demonstrate an awareness of assumptions, question information given, and identify bias in their own work and in primary and secondary sources
  • Connect scientific explorations to careers in science
  • Exercise a healthy, informed skepticism and use scientific knowledge and findings to form their own investigations to evaluate claims in primary and secondary sources
  • Critically analyze the validity of information in primary and secondary sources and evaluate the approaches used to solve problems

Applying and innovating

  • Contribute to care for self, others, community, and world through individual or collaborative approaches
  • Cooperatively design projects with local and/or global connections and applications
  • Contribute to finding solutions to problems at a local and/or global level through inquiry
  • Implement multiple strategies to solve problems in real-life, applied, and conceptual situations
  • Consider the role of scientists in innovation

Communicating

  • Formulate physical or mental theoretical models to describe a phenomenon
  • Communicate scientific ideas and information, and perhaps a suggested course of action, for a specific purpose and audience, constructing evidence-based arguments and using appropriate scientific language, conventions, and representations
  • Express and reflect on a variety of experiences, perspectives, and worldviews through place

 

Content

Feedback loops and regulation of the body’s internal environment

  • Negative:
    • Maintaining normal body temperature
    • Normal CO2 and glucose levels in blood
  • Positive:
    • Temperature regulation (heat stroke, hypothermia)

 

Organ systems

  • Maintenance of homeostasis

 

Lifestyle differences and their effects on human health

  • Dietary plans, exercise, sleep, smoking, salt intake, alcohol consumption, drugs, vaccinations, contraception, fertility drugs 

 

Disease as an imbalance in homeostasis

  • May occur when one or more body systems fail to maintain homeostasis (e.g., ulcers, hypertension, lactose intolerance, diabetes, HIV-AIDS) 

Social Studies

There are many subjects where there is a curricular fit:

Genocide Studies 12

Human Geography 12

Political Studies 12

Social Justice 12

Urban Studies 12

Contemporary Indigenous Studies12

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

Last modified: 
Sep 8, 2020