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Alberta Resource Guide

Kids Boost Immunity matches the Alberta curriculum outcomes listed below. You can also read a description of the core lessons available for Alberta students. Each grade has a tailored selection of lessons that fit their curricular need. Please note that this is not an exhaustive list of the curricular fit - teachers on KBI have found many more curriculum connections than outlined here! Continue scrolling down to see a short description of the core lessons available for each grade.

 

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Alberta curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.

Science

4–1 Investigate the nature of things, demonstrating purposeful action that leads to inferences supported by observations.

4–2 Identify patterns and order in objects and events studied; and record observations, using pictures, words and charts, with guidance in the construction of charts; and make  predictions and generalizations, based on observations.

4–3 Investigate a practical problem, and develop a possible solution.


Social Studies

4.2.1 appreciate how an understanding of Alberta’s history, peoples and stories contributes to their own sense of belonging and identity:

  • Recognize how stories of people and events provide multiple perspectives on past and present events (I, TCC)
  • Recognize oral traditions, narratives and stories as valid sources of knowledge about the land, culture and history (CC, TCC)

Skills and Processes

Dimensions of Thinking

4.S.1 develop skills of critical thinking and creative thinking:

  • Evaluate significant local and current affairs, distinguishing between fact and opinion
  • Evaluate, critically, ideas, information and positions from multiple perspectives
  • Re-evaluate opinions to broaden understanding of a topic or an issue
  • Generate original ideas and strategies in individual and group activities
  • Seek responses to inquiries from various authorities through electronic media 

4.S.3 develop skills of geographic thinking:

  • Construct graphs, tables, charts and maps to interpret information
  • Use cardinal and intermediate directions to locate places on maps and globes


4.S.4 demonstrate skills of decision making and problem solving:

  • Contribute and apply new ideas and strategies, supported with facts and reasons, to decision making and problem solving
  • Identify situations where a decision needs to be made and a problem requires attention
  • Select and use technology to assist in problem solving
  • Use data gathered from a variety of electronic sources to address identified problems

Social Participation as a Democratic Practice

4.S.6 develop age-appropriate behaviour for social involvement as responsible citizens contributing to their community:

  • Initiate projects that meet the particular needs or expectations of their school or community 

Research for Deliberative Inquiry

4.S.7 apply the research process:

  • Develop the skills of skimming and scanning to gather relevant information
  • Organize and synthesize information gathered from a variety of sources
  • Draw and support conclusions, based on information gathered, to answer a research question
  • Formulate new questions as research progresses
  • Cite references as part of research

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Alberta curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.

Science

5–1 Design and carry out an investigation, using procedures that provide a fair test of the question being investigated.


Social Studies

Canada: The Land, Histories and Stories

  • 5.1 Physical Geography of Canada 
  • 5.2 Histories and Stories of Ways of Life in Canada
    • 5.2.1 acknowledge oral traditions, narratives and stories as valid sources of knowledge about the land and diverse Aboriginal cultures and history (CC, I, TCC)
  • 5.3 Canada: Shaping an Identity

Skills and Processes

Dimensions of Thinking

5.S.1 develop skills of critical thinking and creative thinking:

  • analyze significant local and current affairs from a variety of sources, distinguishing between fact and opinion
  • evaluate ideas, information and positions from multiple perspectives
  • re-evaluate personal opinions to broaden understanding of a topic or an issue
  • generate original ideas and strategies in situations of individual and group activities
  • seek responses to inquiries from various authorities through electronic media
  • recognize that information serves different purposes and that data from electronic sources may need to be verified to determine accuracy or relevance for the purpose used 

5.S.3 develop skills of geographic thinking:

  • use latitude and longitude to determine the absolute location of places in Canada on maps and globes
  • construct maps, diagrams and charts to display geographic information
  • use historical maps to make meaning of historical events and issues
  • use cardinal and intermediate directions and simple grids to locate places on maps and globes
  • use the scale on maps and globes to determine the distance between places 

Social Participation as a Democratic Practice

5.S.6 develop age-appropriate behaviour for social involvement as responsible citizens contributing to their community:

  • demonstrate commitment to the well-being of the school or community by volunteering to help where needed 

Research for Deliberative Inquiry

5.S.7 apply the research process:

  • determine themes, patterns and trends from information gathered
  • use graphs, tables, charts and Venn diagrams to interpret information
  • draw and support conclusions, based on information gathered, to answer a research question
  • cite references as part of research
  • design and follow a plan, including a schedule, to be used during an inquiry process, and make revisions to the plan, as necessary
  • access and retrieve appropriate information from the Internet by using a specific search path or from given uniform resource locators (URLs)
  • navigate within a document, compact disc or other software program that contains links
  • organize information gathered from the Internet, or an electronic source, by selecting and recording the data in logical files or categories
  • organize information, using such tools as a database, spreadsheet or electronic webbing
  • use a variety of technologies to organize and synthesize researched information
  • reflect on and describe the processes involved in completing a project 

Communication

5.S.9 develop skills of media literacy:

  • examine how various people might interpret a media message differently
  • examine diverse perspectives regarding an issue presented in the media 

 


Health & Life Skill

  • W- 5.1 - examine the impact of physical activity, nutrition, rest and immunization on the immune system

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Alberta curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Science

6–1 Design and carry out an investigation in which variables are identified and controlled, and that provides a fair test of the question being investigated.

Topic D

6–8 Apply observation and inference skills to recognize and interpret patterns and to distinguish a specific pattern from a group of similar patterns.
6–9 Apply knowledge of the properties and interactions of materials to the investigation and identification of a material sample.


Social Studies

Democracy: Action and Participation

  • 6.1 Citizens Participating in Decision Making
    • 6.1.4 Analyze the structure and functions of local governments (examples are general, not just for Alberta)
    • 6.1.5 Analyze the structure and functions of provincial government (examples are general, not just for Alberta)

Skills and Processes

Dimensions of Thinking

6.S.1 develop skills of critical thinking and creative thinking:

  • assess significant local and current affairs from a variety of sources, with a focus on examining bias and distinguishing fact from opinion
  • critically evaluate ideas, information and positions
  • re-evaluate personal opinions to broaden understanding of a topic or an issue
  • generate original ideas and strategies in individual and group activities
  • seek responses to inquiries from various authorities through electronic media

6.S.3 develop skills of geographic thinking:

  • construct and interpret various types of maps (i.e., historical, physical, political maps) to broaden understanding of topics being studied
  • use geographic tools, including software, that assist in preparing graphs and maps
  • use cardinal and intermediate directions to locate places on maps and globes
  • use scales to determine the distance between places on maps and globes
  • identify geographic problems and issues and pose geographic questions 

Social Participation as a Democratic Practice

6.S.6 develop age-appropriate behaviour for social involvement as responsible citizens contributing to their community, such as:

  • demonstrate commitment to the well-being of their community by drawing attention to situations of injustice where action is needed 

Research for Deliberative Inquiry

5.S.7 apply the research process:

  • determine themes, patterns and trends from information gathered
  • use graphs, tables, charts and Venn diagrams to interpret information
  • draw and support conclusions, based on information gathered, to answer a research question
  • design and follow a plan, including a schedule, to be used during an inquiry process, and make revisions to the plan, as necessary
  • access and retrieve appropriate information from the Internet by using a specific search path or from given uniform resource locators (URLs)
  • organize information gathered from the Internet, or an electronic source, by selecting and recording the data in logical files or categories
  • organize information, using such tools as a database, spreadsheet or electronic webbing
  • use a variety of technologies to organize and synthesize researched information
  • reflect on and describe the processes involved in completing a project 

Communication

6.S.9 develop skills of media literacy:

  • detect bias present in the media
  • examine and assess diverse perspectives regarding an issue presented in the media
  • analyze significant current affairs
  • identify and distinguish points of view expressed in electronic sources on a particular topic
  • recognize that information serves different purposes and that data from electronic sources may need to be verified to determine accuracy or relevance for the purpose used 

 


Health & Life Skill

  • W–6.6 - examine and evaluate the risk factors associated with exposure to blood-borne diseases — HIV, AIDS, hepatitis B/C; e.g., sharing needles, body piercing, tattooing, helping someone who is bleeding, being sexually active

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Alberta curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Science

6–1 Design and carry out an investigation in which variables are identified and controlled, and that provides a fair test of the question being investigated.

Topic D

6–8 Apply observation and inference skills to recognize and interpret patterns and to distinguish a specific pattern from a group of similar patterns.
6–9 Apply knowledge of the properties and interactions of materials to the investigation and identification of a material sample.


Social Studies

Following Confederation: Canadian Expansions 

7.2.1 recognize the positive and negative aspects of immigration and migration (GC, LPP, C, I)
7.2.2 recognize the positive and negative consequences of political decisions (PADM)
7.2.3 appreciate the challenges that individuals and communities face when confronted with rapid change (I, CC, LPP)

Skills and Processes

Dimensions of Thinking

7.S.1 develop skills of critical thinking and creative thinking:

  • determine the validity of information based on context, bias, source, objectivity, evidence and/or reliability to broaden understanding of a topic or an issue
  • evaluate, critically, ideas, information and positions from multiple perspectives
  • demonstrate the ability to analyze local and current affairs
  • re-evaluate personal opinions to broaden understanding of a topic or an issue
  • generate creative ideas and strategies in individual and group activities
  • access diverse viewpoints on particular topics, using appropriate technologies 

7.S.3 develop skills of geographic thinking:

  • construct and interpret maps to broaden understanding of issues, places and peoples of Canada (i.e., elevation, latitude and longitude, population density, waterways)
  • use geographic tools, such as geographical information system (GIS) software, to assist in preparing graphs and maps

Social Participation as a Democratic Practice

7.S.6 develop age-appropriate behaviour for social involvement as responsible citizens contributing to their community:

  • support and participate in activities and projects that promote the well-being and meet the particular needs of their community 

Research for Deliberative Inquiry

7.S.7 apply the research process:

  • develop a position that is supported by information gathered through research
  • draw conclusions based upon research and evidence
  • determine how information serves a variety of purposes and that the accuracy or relevance of information may need verification
  • organize and synthesize researched information
  • formulate new questions as research progresses
  • integrate and synthesize concepts to provide an informed point of view on a research question or an issue 

Communication

7.S.9 develop skills of media literacy:

  • analyze the impact of television, the Internet, radio and print media on a particular current affairs issue
  • detect bias on issues presented in the media
  • examine techniques used to enhance the authority and authenticity of media messages
  • examine the values, lifestyles and points of view represented in a media message
  • identify and distinguish points of view expressed in electronic sources on a particular topic
  • recognize that information serves different purposes and that data from electronic sources may need to be verified to determine accuracy or relevance for the purpose used

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Alberta curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Science

Unit B: Cells and Systems 

1. Investigate living things; and identify and apply scientific ideas used to interpret their general structure, function and organization

  • investigate and describe example scientific studies of the characteristics of living things (e.g., investigate and describe an ongoing scientific study of a locally-found organism)

2. Investigate and describe the role of cells within living things

  • describe the role of cells as a basic unit of life
  • analyze similarities and differences between single-celled and multicelled organisms (e.g., compare, in general terms, an amoeba and a grizzly bear, a single-celled alga and a poplar tree)

4. Describe areas of scientific investigation leading to new knowledge about body systems and to new medical applications

  • identify examples of research into functions and dysfunctions of human cells, organs or body systems
  • describe ways in which research about cells, organs and systems has brought about improvements in human health and nutrition (e.g., development of medicines; immunization procedures; diets based on the needs of organs, such as the heart)
  • investigate and describe factors that affect the healthy function of the human respiratory, circulatory and digestive systems (e.g., investigate the effect of illness, aging or air quality on the function of the respiratory system)

Social Studies

Skills and Processes

Dimensions of Thinking

8.S.1 develop skills of critical thinking and creative thinking:

  • analyze the validity of information based on context, bias, source, objectivity, evidence and reliability to broaden understanding of a topic or an issue
  • evaluate ideas, information and positions from multiple perspectives
  • demonstrate the ability to analyze local and current affairs
  • re-evaluate personal opinions to broaden understanding of a topic or an issue
  • generate creative ideas and strategies in individual and group activities
  • access diverse viewpoints on particular topics by using appropriate technologies 

8.S.2 develop skills of historical thinking:

  • distinguish cause, effect, sequence and correlation in historical events, including the long and short-term causal relations
  • use historical and community resources to organize the sequence of historical events
  • analyze the historical contexts of key events of a given time period 

8.S.3 develop skills of geographic thinking:

  • interpret historical maps to broaden understanding of historical events
  • use thematic maps to describe cultural and political regions
  • construct and interpret various maps to broaden understanding of given topics
  • define geographic problems and issues and pose geographic questions 

Social Participation as a Democratic Practice

8.S.6 develop age-appropriate behaviour for social involvement as responsible citizens contributing to their community:

  • volunteer with organizations, projects and activities that ensure the growth and vitality of their community 

Research for Deliberative Inquiry

8.S.7 apply the research process:

  • integrate and synthesize concepts to provide an informed point of view on a research question or an issue
  • develop a position that is supported by information gathered through research
  • draw conclusions based upon research and evidence
  • determine how information serves a variety of purposes and that the accuracy or relevance of information may need verification
  • organize and synthesize researched information
  • formulate new questions as research progresses
  • include and organize references as part of research
  • plan and conduct a search, using a wide variety of electronic sources

Communication

8.S.9 develop skills of media literacy:

  • examine techniques used to enhance the authority and authenticity of media messages
  • examine the values, lifestyles and points of view represented in a media message
  • analyze the impact of television, the Internet, radio and print media on a particular current affairs issue 

 

Health & Life Skill

  • W–8.13 - describe symptoms, effects, treatments and prevention for common sexually transmitted diseases; i.e., chlamydia, HPV, herpes, gonorrhea, hepatitis B/C, HIV

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Alberta curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Social Studies

Dimensions of Thinking

9.S.1 develop skills of critical thinking and creative thinking:

  • determine the validity of information based on context, bias, source, objectivity, evidence or reliability to broaden understanding of a topic or an issue
  • evaluate, critically, ideas, information and positions from multiple perspectives
  • demonstrate the ability to analyze current affairs from multiple perspectives
  • re-evaluate personal opinions to broaden understanding of a topic or an issue
  • access diverse viewpoints on particular topics by using appropriate technologies
  • assemble and organize different viewpoints in order to assess their validity

9.S.2 develop skills of historical thinking:

  • analyze selected issues and problems from the past, placing people and events in a context of time and place
  • distinguish cause, effect, sequence and correlation in historical events and issues, including the long- and short-term causal relations
  • use historical and community resources to organize the sequence of historical events
  • analyze the historical contexts of key events of a given time period

9.S.3 develop skills of geographic thinking:

  • interpret thematic maps to analyze economic and political issues
  • define geographic problems and issues and pose geographic questions

Research for Deliberative Inquiry

9.S.7 apply the research process:

  • reflect on changes of perspective or opinion based on information gathered and research conducted
  • integrate and synthesize concepts to provide an informed point of view on a research question or an issue
  • develop a position supported by information gathered during research
  • draw conclusions based upon research and evidence
  • determine how information serves a variety of purposes and that the accuracy or relevancemay need verification 
  • organize and synthesize researched information
  • formulate new questions as research progresses
  • practise responsible and ethical use of information and technology
  • evaluate the relevance of electronically accessed information to a particular topic

Communication

9.S.9 develop skills of media literacy:

  • examine techniques used to enhance the authority and authenticity of media messages
  • examine the values, lifestyles and points of view represented in a media message
  • analyze the impact of television, the Internet, radio and print media on a particular current affairs issue 

 

Health & Life Skill

  • W–9.10 Assess the quality and reliability of health information

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade



All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Alberta curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Social Studies

2 - To what extent should contemporary society respond to the legacies of historical globalization? 

  • 2.1 recognize and appreciate historical and contemporary consequences of European contact, historical globalization and imperialism on Aboriginal societies (TCC, CC, I, GC)
  • 2.2 exhibit a global consciousness with respect to the human condition (GC, C)
  • 2.3 accept social responsibilities associated with global citizenship (C, GC)
  • 2.4 recognize and appreciate the validity of oral histories (TCC, CC)
  • 2.5 recognize and appreciate various perspectives regarding the prevalence and impacts ofEurocentrism (TCC, CC, I) 
  • 2.6 examine impacts of cultural contact between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples (exchange of goods and technologies, depopulation, influences on government and social institutions) (TCC, CC, GC)
  • 2.11 analyze contemporary global issues that have origins in policies and practices of post-colonial governments in Canada and other locations (consequences of residential  schools, social impact on Indigenous peoples, loss of Indigenous languages, civil strife) (GC, CC, TCC, I) 
  • 2.13 examine legacies of historical globalization and imperialism that continue to influence globalization (TCC, GC)

3 - To what extent should we embrace globalization? 

  • 3.1 recognize and appreciate multiple perspectives that exist with respect to the relationships among politics, economics, the environment and globalization (GC, ER, PADM)
  • 3.2 recognize and appreciate impacts of globalization on the interdependent relationships among people, the economy and the environment (GC, ER, PADM) 

4 - To what extent should I, as a citizen, respond to globalization?

  • 4.1 recognize and appreciate the impact of globalization on the quality of life of individuals and communities (GC, C, CC)
  • 4.2 recognize and appreciate the importance of human rights in determining quality of life (GC, C)
  • 4.3 accept political, social and environmental responsibilities associated with global citizenship (C, GC, ER)
  • 4.4 explore various understandings of quality of life (GC)
  • 4.5 analyze impacts of globalization on children and youth (awareness of global issues, employment  issues, identity) (GC, C, PADM, ER, I)
  • 4.8 analyze how globalization affects individuals and communities (migration, technology, agricultural issues, pandemics, resource issues, contemporary issues) (GC, LPP) 
  • 4.11 develop strategies to demonstrate active, responsible global citizenship (C, GC, PADM, ER) 

Skills and Processes

Dimensions of Thinking

S.1 develop skills of critical thinking and creative thinking:

  • analyze ideas and information from multiple sources
  • determine relationships among multiple sources of information
  • determine the validity of information based on context, bias, sources, objectivity, evidence or reliability
  • evaluate personal assumptions and opinions
  • determine the strengths and weaknesses of arguments
  • identify seemingly unrelated ideas to explain a concept or event
  • analyze current affairs from a variety of perspectives
  • identify main ideas underlying a position or issue

S.3 develop skills of geographic thinking:

  • analyze the ways in which physical and human geographic features influence world events
  • draw conclusions from maps and other geographic sources
  • locate, gather, interpret and organize information, using historical maps 

Social Participation as a Democratic Practice

S.6 develop age-appropriate behaviour for social involvement as responsible citizens contributing to their community:

  • demonstrate leadership by engaging in actions that will enhance the well-being of self and others in the community
  • promote and respect the contributions of team members when working as a team
  • cooperate with others for the well-being of the community 

Research for Deliberative Inquiry

S.7 apply the research process:

  • develop and express an informed position on an issue
  • develop conclusions based on evidence gathered through research of a wide variety of sources
  • use research tools and methods to investigate issues
  • consult a wide variety of sources, including oral histories, that reflect varied viewpoints on particular issues
  • revise questions on an issue as new information becomes available
  • select relevant information when conducting research
  • cite sources correctly to respect the ownership and integrity of information
  • use calendars, time management or project management software to assist in organizing the research process
  • plan and perform searches, using digital sources
  • generate understandings of issues by using some form of technology to facilitate theprocess 

Communication

S.9 develop skills of media literacy:

  • assess the authority, reliability and validity of electronically accessed information
  • analyze the validity of various points of view in media messages
  • analyze information from multiple sources, evaluating each source in terms of the author’s perspective or bias and use of evidence
  • analyze the impact of various forms of media
  • demonstrate discriminatory selection of electronically accessed information 

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Alberta curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Biology 20

Unit B: Ecosystems and Population Change

  • 20–B1.5k Explain the fundamental principles of taxonomy and binomial nomenclature, using modes of nutrition at the kingdom level and morphological characteristics at the genus species level
  • 20–B1.3s analyze data and apply mathematical and conceptual models to develop and assess possible solutions
    • Apply classification and binomial nomenclature systems in a field study (AI–NS1)

Unit C – Disease Defence and Human Health Describe the natural mechanisms that protect the human organism from pathogens

  • Explain the role of the human organism’s physical defences in preventing infection by pathogens (e.g., skin, mucus membranes, tears, saliva, digestive system)
    • Investigate and explain the role of blood components in controlling pathogens (e.g., white blood cells and antibodies)
    • Identify the major cellular and chemical components of the human immune system
    • Describe, in general terms, how the immune system protects the body by attacking foreign or abnormal proteins
    • Compare forms of immunity in the human organism, and explain how immunity is established (e.g., natural and artificial immunization)
    • Explain how specific antibiotic therapies, vaccines or medications are used to treat or prevent a disease (e.g., measles, rabies, tetanus, smallpox, tuberculosis)
    • Describe how the overuse and improper use of antibiotics may lead to the development of resistance in bacteria (e.g., use of prescription antibiotics for viral infections)

Unit D: Human Systems

  • 20–D3.2s Conduct investigations into relationships between and among observable variables and use a broad range of tools and techniques to gather and record data and information

Social Studies

3 - Should internationalism be pursued?

  • 3.1 appreciate that nations and states engage in regional and global affairs for a variety of reasons (GC, C)
  • 3.2 appreciate the impacts of nation and state involvement in regional and global affairs on individual and collective identities (GC, C)
  • 3.3 demonstrate a global consciousness with respect to the human condition and global affairs (C, GC) 
    3.4 examine the motives of nation and state involvement or noninvolvement in international affairs (economic stability, self-determination, peace, security, humanitarianism) (GC, LPP, TCC)
    3.5 explore understandings of internationalism (GC, PADM)
    3.6 examine how internationalism can be promoted by foreign policy (multilateralism,supranationalism, peacekeeping, foreign aid, international law and agreements) (GC, PADM, ER)
    3.7 analyze the extent to which selected organizations promote internationalism (United Nations, World Council of Indigenous Peoples, European Union, l’Organisation internationale de la Francophonie, Arctic Council) (GC, PADM, ER)
    3.8 examine impacts of the pursuit of internationalism in addressing contemporary global issues (conflict, poverty, debt, disease, environment, human rights) (GC, PADM, ER)
    3.9 evaluate the extent to which nationalism must be sacrificed in the interest of internationalism (GC, PADM, ER)

Social Sciences

There are a number of subjects where t

There are a number of subjects where there is a fit:

Geography 20-30
Political Science 20-30
 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Alberta curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.

Social Studies

To what extent should my actions as a citizen be shaped by an ideology?

  • 4.2 exhibit a global consciousness with respect to the human condition and world issues (C, GC)

Biology 30

Unit A: Nervous and Endocrine Systems

  • 30–A2.2k Describe the function of the hormones of the principal endocrine glands, i.e., thyroidstimulating hormone (TSH)/thyroxine, calcitonin/parathyroid hormone (PTH), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)/cortisol, glucagon/insulin, human growth hormone (hGH), antidiuretic hormone (ADH), epinephrine, aldosterone, and describe how they maintain homeostasis through feedback
  • 30–A2.3k Explain the metabolic roles hormones may play in homeostasis; i.e., thyroxine in metabolism; insulin, glucagon and cortisol in blood sugar regulation; hGH in growth; ADH in water regulation; aldosterone in sodium ion regulation
  • 30–B2.2sts Explain why decisions regarding the application of scientific and technological development involve a variety of perspectives, including social, cultural, environmental, ethical and economic considerations

Social Sciences

There are a number of subjects where t

There are a number of subjects where there is a fit:

Geography 20-30
Political Science 20-30
 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

Last modified: 
Sep 13, 2020