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New Brunswick Resource Guide

Kids Boost Immunity matches the New Brunswick curriculum outcomes listed below. You can also read a description of the core lessons available for New Brunswick students. Each grade has a tailored selection of lessons that fit their curricular need. Please note that this is not an exhaustive list of the curricular fit - teachers on KBI have found many more curriculum connections than outlined here! Continue scrolling down to see a short description of the core lessons available for each grade.

 

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the New Brunswick curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Science

Unit 1: Life Science: Habitats

Skills

Initiating and Planning

  • 204-1 propose questions to investigate and practical problems to solve
  • 204-3 state a prediction and a hypothesis based on an observed pattern of events
  • 204-6 identify various methods for finding answers to given questions as well as solutions to given problems, and ultimately select one that is appropriate

Social Studies

Unit 2: The Nature of Exploration

Unit Outcomes

4.2.3 Evaluate the impact of exploration over time

  • Sample Learning & Assessment Strategies - Students may: Record on a class chart the information they know about vaccines. As a class, develop questions about the discovery and uses of these vaccines that they want a medical professional to answer. Invite that person to visit the class and answer their questions. Add any new information to the class chart. Correct any misinformation.

Processes and Skills

  • Communication - Organize data using visual and written representations, write in many genres, use communication technology, read for information, listen to and ask questions, interview, communicate orally, organize and represent information.
  • Inquiry - Deduce ideas, synthesize facts, formulate questions for inquiry, listen and respond critically, identify issues, interpret and analyze observations, data, text and graphic organizers, gather and record information.

Unit 3: Exploring Our World

Unit Outcomes

4.3.1 Examine major physical features of the world

  • Elaboration - Now students are introduced to hemispheres, poles, equator, and prime meridian, plus gain an awareness of longitude and latitude.

4.3.3 Examine the relationship between humans and the physical environment

  • Enduring Understanding - the physical environment affects the way we live and provides the means to live; people need to be sensitive to the impacts they have on their physical environment.
  • Inquiry - Geographic Interactions: How do humans impact the environment? How does the environment impact where people live, how they live, and how they meet the challenges posed by the environment?

Unit 4 Exploring The Landscapes of Canada

4.4.3 Describe the political landscape of Canada

  • Enduring Understanding - Canada is a country comprising provinces and territories; Canada has a central, federal government; The Federal government makes decisions and laws for the entire country in areas for which it has responsibility.
  • Inquiry - Change and Continuity: Why do we have laws? What are some old laws that may not be needed anymore? What are some new laws that may be needed? Why have some laws remained the same over time?  Significance: What is the most important law (past or present) ever enforced in Canada?

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the New Brunswick curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Science

Unit 1: Life Science: Meeting Basic Needs and Maintaining a Healthy Body

STSE

  • 104-2 demonstrate and describe processes for investigating scientific questions and solving technological problems
  • 105-2 identify examples of scientific questions and technological problems addressed in the past
  • 106-4 describe instances in which scientific ideas and discoveries have led to new inventions and applications
  • 107-2 describe and compare tools, techniques, and materials used by different people in their community and region to meet their needs
  • 107-5 provide examples of how science and technology have been used to solve problems in their community and region
  • 107-8 describe examples of technologies that have been developed to improve their living conditions
  • 107-12 provide examples of Canadians who have contributed to science and technology
  • 107-14 identify scientific discoveries and technological innovations of people from different cultures

Skills

  • 204-1 propose questions to investigate and practical problems to solve
  • 204-2 rephrase questions in a testable form
  • 205-1 carry out procedures to explore a given problem and to ensure a fair test of a proposed idea by controlling major variables
  • 206-3 identify and suggest explanations for patterns and discrepancies in data 206-4 evaluate the usefulness of different information sources in answering a given question

Knowledge

  • 302-4 describe the role played by body systems in helping humans and other animals to grow and reproduce and meet their basic needs
  • 302-8 describe the body’s defences, such as tears, saliva, skin, certain blood cells, and stomach secretions, against infections
  • 302-7 describe the role of the skin

Social Science

All Units:

Processes and Skills

  • Communication -  organize data with visual representation; draw and interpret maps; describe location; use technology; describe physical characteristics of a region; read for information; interpret maps; communicate orally
  • Inquiry - form questions regarding geography, climate, and vegetation; compare and contrast; make decisions; develop strategies to gather information; make predictions; gather geographic information using maps
  • Participation - explore, create, and construct maps; locate points, places, and land forms on maps; contribute to discussions about locations and features of a particular location; predict change; work collaboratively in groups to investigate

Unit 5: Interactions

Unit Outcomes

5.5.1 Examine interactions between British and French and First Nations and Inuit in what later became Atlantic Canada

  • Elaboration - ...While the negative consequences of interactions are essential to this study, such as the introduction of devastating diseases – small pox, influenza, and measles, it is also important to recognize the positive interactions. These include technological and medical contributions of First Nations and Inuit to the British and French, such as the use of various botanicals for healing and technologies such as snow goggles.

5.6.1 Illustrate the similarities and differences of past societies and your society

  • Decision-making - Just as past societies engaged in decision making, our society makes decisions such as rules and laws.
  • Interactions - Like societies of the past, our society interacts with other societies. This is evident by the importance our society places on multiculturalism.

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the New Brunswick curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Science

STSE

  • 104-5 describe how results of similar and repeated investigations may vary and suggest possible explanations for variations
  • 104-8 demonstrate the importance of using the languages of science and technology to compare and communicate ideas, processes, and results
  • 105-1 describe examples of scientific questions and technological problems that are currently being studied
  • 105-5 identify examples of scientific knowledge that have developed as a result of the gradual accumulation of evidence
  • 106-3 describe examples of improvements to the tools and techniques of scientific investigation that have led to new discoveries
  • 107-6 provide examples of how science and technology have been used to solve problems around the world 107-11 identify examples of careers in which science and technology play a major role
    • Students should understand that microorganisms can be both advantageous (e.g., food digestion in the bowel, composting sanitation, food preservation, and disease control) and disadvantageous (e.g., spreading many germs and diseases) to humans. Guest speakers, or students’ interviews with grocers, food processors, fish plant workers, sanitation workers, health inspectors, public health nurse or other people in their community are good exercises.

Skills

  • 204-1 propose questions to investigate and practical problems to solve
  • 204-6 identify various methods for finding answers to given questions and solutions to given problems, and select one that is appropriate
  • 205-8 identify and use a variety of sources and technologies to gather pertinent information

Knowledge

  • 300-19 examine and describe some living things that cannot be seen with the naked eye

Social Studies

Unit 5: World Issues

6.5.1 Analyse the effects of the distribution of wealth around the world

  • Use statistical data to represent the distribution of wealth around the world
  • Examine the effects of the uneven distrubiton of wealth on quality of life
  • Define poverty and give examples of its effects

6.5.2 Examine selected examples of human rights issues around the world

  • Identify human rights issues related to rights of children

6.5.3 Take age-appropriate actions to demonstrate an understanding of responsibilities as global citizens

  • Explain the rights and responsibilities of being a global citizen
  • Support a position on local/national/international issue after considering various perspectives
  • Plan and take age-appropriate actions to address local/national/international problems or issues

Health Education

Personal Wellness

B1) describe the domains of wellness and identify strategies for promoting their own wellness


Math

SCO: N6: Demonstrate an understanding of percent (limited to whole numbers) concretely, pictorially and symbolically. [C, CN, PS, R, V]


 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the New Brunswick curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Science

STSE

  • 109-1 describe the role of collecting evidence, finding relationships, and proposing explanations in the development of scientific knowledge
  • 109-12 distinguish between terms that are scientific or technological and those that are not
  • 109-13 explain the importance of choosing words that are scientifically and technologically appropriate
  • 111-1 provide examples of scientific knowledge that have resulted in the development of technologies
  • 112-4 provide examples of Canadian institutions that support scientific and technological endeavours
  • 112-8 provide examples to illustrate that scientific and technological activities take place in a variety of individual or group settings
  • 113-11 propose a course of action on social issues related to science and technology, taking into account personal need

Skills

  • 208-2 identify questions to investigate arising from practical problems and issues
  • 208-5 state a prediction and a hypothesis based on background information or an observed pattern of events
  • 209-5 select and integrate information from various print and electronic sources or from several parts of the same source

Knowledge

  • 304-1 explain how biological classification takes into account the diversity of life on Earth

Social Studies

Unit 2: Economic Empowerment

7.1.1 explore the general concept of empowerment:

  • Define power and authority and explain how each influences their own lives
  • Identify and categorize various sources of power and authority
  • Identify groups that are empowered and disempowered in our society (local, national, and global)

7.2.2 Investigate the various ways economic systems empower or disempower people

  • explain that people have basic needs that must be met
  • analyze the role that money plays in meeting basic needs
  • investigate and report on the challenges of the poverty cycle

7.2.3 Analyze trends that could impact future economic empowerment 

  • identify current trends and examine factors that may impact on these trends
  • take actions which provide or enable personal economic empowerment in the future

Unit 3: Political Empowerment

7.3.4 Examine the political structure of Canada as a result of Confederation

  • chart the structure of the Canadian government after Confederation
  • compare and contrast the power given to the different levels of government by the BNA Act
  • explain the role of the individual in the democratic process in Canada

Health Education

Caring for Yourself, Your Family and Your Community

A2) describe selected examples of infectious and noninfectious disease, identifying their detection and prevention

Personal Wellness

B1) identify strategies for promoting their own wellness


 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the New Brunswick curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Science

STSE

  • 109-13 explain the importance of choosing words that are scientifically or technologically appropriate
  • 110-2 distinguish between ideas used in the past and theories used today to explain natural phenomena
  • 110-5 illustrate examples of conflicting evidence for similar scientific questions
  • 111-5 describe the science underlying particular technologies designed to explore natural phenomena, extend human capabilities, or solve practical problem
  • 112-10 provide examples of science- and technology-based careers in their province or territory
  • 113-8 make informed decisions about applications of science and technology, taking into account personal and social advantages and disadvantages

Skills

  • 208-1 rephrase questions in a testable form and clearly define practical problems
  • 208-6 design an experiment and identify major variables
  • 209-1 carry out procedures controlling the major variables
  • 210-7 identify and suggest explanations for discrepancies in data

Knowledge

  • 304-4 illustrate and explain that the cell is a living system that exhibits all the characteristics of life

Social Studies

Theme One: Physical Setting

1.1 identify and locate the Atlantic region in the Canadian, North American, and global contexts

  • 1.1.1 define the terms relative location, absolute location, latitude, longitude, co-ordinates, physical feature, and cultural feature (K)

Theme Four: Technology

4.6 analyse the effect of technology on resource industries in Atlantic Canada

  • Sample Assessment Strategies - construct graphic organizers illustrating the consequences for the community of one of the following (The organizer should indicate the interdependence among economic factors and between economic and social considerations.): The spread of an agricultural virus or disease.

Theme Five: Interdependence

5.2 examine and analyse how Atlantic Canadians are members of the global community through different interconnected systems

  • 5.2.1 define what is meant by system, interdependence, and global village (K)
  • 5.2.2 explore ways in which political, economic, technological, and cultural systems create interdependence in the world today (A)
  • 5.2.4 examine the cultural barriers that may impede understanding between people and that sometimes lead to conflict (A)
  • 5.2.7 explore a human rights issue in Atlantic Canada that has international implications (A)
  • 5.2.8 assess the implications of a selected current international agreement for Atlantic Canada (I)

5.3 assess the individual qualities and attributes Atlantic Canadians need to become contributing members of the global community

  • 5.3.1 identify qualities and attributes that individuals need to be effective global citizens (K)
  • 5.3.2 discuss the extent to which global citizenship values are reflected in his/her community or region (I)
  • 5.3.3 identify student activities that contribute to global citizenship (K)
  • 5.3.4 suggest ways that students can increase awareness of global citizenship in the community at large (A)
  • 5.3.5 evaluate the extent to which his/her peer group is prepared to contribute as global citizens to the next generation of leaders (I)

5.4 demonstrate an understanding that the future well-being of Atlantic Canada involves co-operation with the national and global community

  • 5.4.1 evaluate the importance of co-operation between Atlantic Canadians and other parts of Canada for the well-being of the region (I)
  • 5.4.4 assess the importance of Atlantic Canadians’ participation in international groups and organizations (A)

Health Education

Caring for Yourself, Your Family and Your Community

A1) identify the relationship between high-risk behaviours and resulting consequences

A2) identify and describe how to promote safety and prevent injury or illness

Personal Wellness

B1) identify strategies for promoting their own wellness

B2) identify factors that enhance health or that cause illness

Growth and Development

D2) understand the choices and realize both the longand short-term consequences and responsibilities that exist with becoming sexually active


 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the New Brunswick curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Science

Cellular Processes

Elaborations–Strategies for Learning and Teaching - "A possible opening to this unit is to call upon students to observe, note, and report differences and similarities among members of their class or families....Another possible context for investigation is a study of diseases, their causes, and controls."


Social Studies

Learning Outcomes

GCO 3 Students will explore social responsibility.

  • SCO 3.1 Students will take age-appropriate actions that demonstrate the rights and responsibilities of citizenship (local, national, and global).
  • SCO 3.2 Students will explain the structure and operation of governance in Canada.

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade



All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the New Brunswick curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the New Brunswick curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Biology 11

Unit 1: The Cell

STSE

  • 114-1 Explain how a paradigm shift can change scientific world views.
  • 114-2 Explain the role of evidence, theories, and paradigms in the development of scientific knowledge.
  • 114-9 Explain the importance of communicating the results of a scientific or technological endeavour, using appropriate language and conventions
  • 116-2 Analyze and describe examples where scientific understanding was enhanced or revised as a result of the invention of a technology.
  • 116-6 Describe and evaluate the design of technological solutions and the way they function, using scientific principles.

Skills

  • 214-1 Describe and apply classification systems and nomenclatures used in the sciences.

Knowledge

  • 314-7 Compare and contrast different types of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

Unit 2: Biodiversity

STSE

  • 114-5 Describe the importance of peer review in the development of scientific knowledge.
  • 115-7 Explain how scientific knowledge evolves as new evidence comes to light and as laws and theories are tested and subsequently restricted, revised, or replaced.
  • 116-2 Analyse and describe examples where scientific understanding was enhanced or revised as a result of the invention of a technology
  • 118-6 Construct arguments to support a decision or judgment, using examples and evidence while recognizing various perspectives.

Skills

  • 212-6 Design an experiment and identify specific variables.
  • 213-6 Use library and electronic research tools to collect information on a given topic
  • 214-1 Describe and apply classification systems and nomenclatures used in the sciences.
  • 214-2 Identify limitations of a given classification system and identify alternative ways of classifying to accommodate anomalies.
  • 214-8 Evaluate the relevance, reliability, and adequacy of data and data collection methods.
  • 214-9 Identify and apply criteria, including the presence of bias, for evaluating evidence and sources of information.

Knowledge

  • 313-1 Analyze and explain the life cycle of a representative organism from each kingdom, as well as of a representative virus.
  • 316-4 Outline evidence and arguments pertaining to the origin, development, and diversity of living organisms on Earth.
  • 316-5 Use organisms found in a local or regional ecosystem to demonstrate an understanding of fundamental principles of taxonomy.
  • 316-6 Describe the anatomy and physiology of a representative organism from each kingdom, as well as from a representative virus.
  • 317-1 Explain how different plant and animal systems, including the vascular and nervous systems, help maintain homeostasis
  • 317-8 Explain how behaviours such as tropisms, instinct, and learned behaviour help maintain homeostasis.

Unit 3: Maintaining Dynamic Equilibrium

STSE

  • 116-4 Analyse and describe examples where technologies were developed based on scientific understanding.
  • 118-8 Distinguish between questions that can be answered by science and those that cannot, and between problems that can be solved by technology and those that cannot.
  • 118-9 propose a course of action on social issues related to science and technology, taking into account human and environmental needs.

Skills

  • 212-6 Design an experiment and identify specific variables.
  • 214-9 Identify and apply criteria, including the presence of bias, for evaluating evidence and sources of information.

Knowledge

  • 317-1 Explain how different plant and animal systems, including the vascular and nervous systems, help maintain homeostasis.
    • In general, explain how the immune system recognizes and destroys antigens that penetrate the first line of defense.
  • 317-3 Explain the importance of nutrition and fitness to the maintenance of homeostasis.
  • 317-4 Identify, in general terms the impact of viral, bacterial, genetic and environmental diseases on the homeostasis of an organism.
    • Compare the mechanisms of various forms of acquired immunity.
  • 317-6 Predict the impact of environmental factors such as allergens on homeostasis within an organism.
    • Explain the meaning of the terms allergen and antibody and their role in an allergic reaction
  • 317-8 Explain how behaviours such as tropisms, instinct, and learned behaviour help to maintain homeostasis.

(Page 46 of the curriculum guide covers the Immune System as a whole).


Human Physiology 110

GCO 1: Demonstrate an understanding that the various dimensions of wellness interact and impact on one another and on the structures and functioning of the human body.

SCO 1.1 Explore factors which impact on overall wellness

  • Infection and disease including examples of the effects on whole body health o Prevention through good hygiene, first aid and food handling
  • Resistance through naturally acquired immunity and vaccinations (childhood vaccinations - measles, mumps, polio, rubella, tetanus, diphtheria)

Modern History

  • 4.3.1 Compare and contrast the quest for collective security in 1919 with that of modern day efforts.
  • 6.3. War by Proxy - Making Connections.
    • 6.3.1. Understand that the nuclear threat did not disappear with the end of the Cold War.

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the New Brunswick curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Biology 12

STSE

  • 114-2 Explain the role of evidence, theories, and paradigms in the development of scientific knowledge.
  • 115-3 Explain how a major scientific milestone revolutionized thinking in the scientific communities.
  • 155-5 Analyze why and how a particular technology was developed and improved over time.
  • 116-2 Analyze and describe examples where scientific understanding was enhanced or revised as a result of the invention of a technology.
  • 116-4 Analyse and describe examples where technologies were developed based on scientific understanding.
  • 116-6 Describe and evaluate the design of technological solutions and the way they function, using scientific principles.
  • 117-2 Analyse society‟s influence on scientific and technological endeavours.
  • 117-7 Identify and describe science and technology-based careers related to the science they are studying.

Skills

  • 212-4 State a prediction and a hypothesis based on available evidence and background information.
  • 213-7 Select and integrate information from various sprint and electronic sources or from several parts of the same source.
  • 214-9 Identify and apply criteria, including the presence of bias, for evaluating evidence and sources of information.
  • 214-12 Explain how data support or refute the hypothesis or prediction

Knowledge

  • 317-4 Identify in general terms the impact of viral, bacterial, genetic and environmental diseases on the homeostasis of an organism.
  • 317-5 Evaluate, considering ethical issues, the consequences of medical treatments such as radiation therapy, cosmetic surgery, and chemotherapy

Modern History

  • 4.3.1 Compare and contrast the quest for collective security in 1919 with that of modern day efforts.
  • 6.3. War by Proxy - Making Connections.
    • 6.3.1. Understand that the nuclear threat did not disappear with the end of the Cold War.

World Issues 120

1 Humanity: Students will examine the unity and diversity of the human experience.

  • 1.1 analyze factors that influence the distribution of wealth locally, nationally, and internationally
  • 1.2 investigate different conceptions of quality of life including conceptions beyond those measured by economic success;

2 Interdependence: Students will examine their own place within the interdependent systems that link humans to each other and to the natural world.

  • SCO 2.1 analyze issues resulting from interactions among individuals, groups, and societies;
  • SCO 2.2 analyze actions that support peace and sustainability;
  • SCO 2.3 demonstrate personal and social responsibility for a peaceful and sustainable world

3 Geopolitics: Students will examine the rights and responsibilities of citizenship and the role of governance institutions at the local, national, and global levels.

  • 3.2 analyze the origins; evolution; and local, national, and/or global responses to conflicts.
  • 3.3 evaluate causes, consequences, and solutions to violations of a group or individual’s human rights; and
  • 3.4 assess social justice initiatives, demonstrating responsible citizenship, from various institutions and agencies including governments, NGOs, and individuals.

Political Science 120

GCO 2 Political Systems

  • SCO 2.1 Students will explain the structure and operations of governance in Canada.

GCO 3 Political Engagement SCO

  • 3.1 Students will examine the rights, responsibilities, roles and status of individuals and groups in Canada.

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

Last modified: 
Sep 13, 2020