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Québec Resource Guide

Kids Boost Immunity matches the Québec curriculum outcomes listed below. You can also read a description of the core lessons available for Québec students. Each grade has a tailored selection of lessons that fit their curricular need. Please note that this is not an exhaustive list of the curricular fit - teachers on KBI have found many more curriculum connections than outlined here! Continue scrolling down to see a short description of the core lessons available for each grade.

 

Cross-Curricular Competencies

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with the Cross-Curricular Competencies. This includes (but not limited to):

  • To gather information. To select appropriate information sources. To compare information from different sources. To make connections between what they already know and new information. To distinguish between essential and secondary information.
  • To recognize various information sources. To explore various sources and understand the use of each. To question information sources.
  • To put information to use. To imagine possible uses. To formulate questions. To answer his/her questions using the information gathered. To consider new uses. To respect copyright. To use the information in new contexts.
  • To analyze the components of a situational problem. To identify the context and the main elements of the situational problem and to make connections among them. To recognize similarities to situational problems solved previously
  • To adopt a flexible approach. To redo the preceding steps in the same or a different order as many times as necessary in order to solve the problem.
  • To test a solution. To choose a possible solution, apply it and evaluate its effectiveness. To choose and test another possible solution if necessary.
  • To formulate possible solutions. To list and classify possible solutions. To consider the appropriateness of each solution. To consider its requirements and consequences. To imagine the situational problem solved.
  • To evaluate the procedure used. To review the steps taken. To identify successful strategies and analyze the difficulties encountered.
  • To master the information and communications technologies. To be familiar with the purposes, concepts, vocabulary, procedures and techniques of ICT. To recognize familiar concepts in a new context. To explore new functions of software programs and operating systems.
  • To evaluate his/her use of information and communications technologies. To recognize his/her successes and difficulties. To identify the limitations of the technology employed in a given situation. To identify ways to improve his/her use of ICT.
  • To use information and communications technologies to carry out a task. To explore the potential of ICT for a given task. To choose software programs and functions appropriate for the task. To use appropriate working and troubleshooting strategies.

Science and Technology

Living Things

  • Characteristics of living things:
    • metabolism of plants and animals (e.g. nutrition, respiration, growth, death)
    • reproduction of plants and animals
  • Organization of living things:
    • classification of life forms (e.g. microorganisms, fungi, plants, animals)
  • Interaction between living organisms and their environment
    • living things and their habitats
  • Terminology related to an understanding of living things
  • Conventions (e.g. plant and animal identification key)
  • Graphs (e.g. pictograph, histogram)
  • Tables (e.g. plant and animal classification tables)

Exploration strategies

  • Studying a problem or a phenomenon from different points of view
  • Distinguishing between the different types of information useful for solving the problem
  • Recalling similar problems that have already been solved
  • Becoming aware of his or her previous representations
  • Drawing a diagram for the problem or illustrating it 
  • Formulating questions 
  • Putting forward hypotheses
  • Exploring various ways of solving the problem 
  • Anticipating the results of his or her approach 
  • Imagining solutions to a problem in light of his or her explanations
  • Taking into account the constraints involved in solving a problem or making an object
  • Examining his or her mistakes in order to identify their source
  • Using different types of reasoning (e.g. induction, deduction, inference, comparison, classification)
  • Using empirical approaches (e.g. trial and error, analysis, exploration using one’s senses
  • Using different sources of information
  • Validating sources of information

Suggestions for Using Information and Communications Technologies

  • Using the Internet to access Web sites related to science and technology

Social Sciences

Iroquoian Society Between 1500 and 1745

  • Territory occupied, elements of the way of life, use of European products, religion, European diseases

Researching and Working with Information in Geography and History

  • Defining the problem
  • Drawing on previous learnings
  • Considering research strategies that will lead to a solution
  • Selecting useful questions
  • Locating sources of information
  • Distinguishing between facts and opinions
  • Criticizing data

Techniques Specific to Geography

  • Reading maps
  • Interpreting maps
  • Using spatial reference points
  • Orienting a map
  • Locating a place on a map, on a globe of the world, in an atlas
  • Interpreting illustrated documents (illustrations, sketches, posters, etc.)
  • Interpreting climate charts

Physical Education and Health

Lifestyle Habits

  • Mental relaxation

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

Cross-Curricular Competencies

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with the Cross-Curricular Competencies. This includes (but not limited to):

  • To gather information. To select appropriate information sources. To compare information from different sources. To make connections between what they already know and new information. To distinguish between essential and secondary information.
  • To recognize various information sources. To explore various sources and understand the use of each. To question information sources.
  • To put information to use. To imagine possible uses. To formulate questions. To answer his/her questions using the information gathered. To consider new uses. To respect copyright. To use the information in new contexts.
  • To analyze the components of a situational problem. To identify the context and the main elements of the situational problem and to make connections among them. To recognize similarities to situational problems solved previously
  • To adopt a flexible approach. To redo the preceding steps in the same or a different order as many times as necessary in order to solve the problem.
  • To test a solution. To choose a possible solution, apply it and evaluate its effectiveness. To choose and test another possible solution if necessary.
  • To formulate possible solutions. To list and classify possible solutions. To consider the appropriateness of each solution. To consider its requirements and consequences. To imagine the situational problem solved.
  • To evaluate the procedure used. To review the steps taken. To identify successful strategies and analyze the difficulties encountered.
  • To master the information and communications technologies. To be familiar with the purposes, concepts, vocabulary, procedures and techniques of ICT. To recognize familiar concepts in a new context. To explore new functions of software programs and operating systems.
  • To evaluate his/her use of information and communications technologies. To recognize his/her successes and difficulties. To identify the limitations of the technology employed in a given situation. To identify ways to improve his/her use of ICT.
  • To use information and communications technologies to carry out a task. To explore the potential of ICT for a given task. To choose software programs and functions appropriate for the task. To use appropriate working and troubleshooting strategies.

Science and Technology

Living Things

  • Characteristics of living things:
    • metabolism of plants and animals (e.g. nutrition, respiration, growth, death)
    • reproduction of plants and animals
  • Interaction between living organisms and their environment
    • adaptation (e.g. mimicry)
  • Terminology related to an understanding of living things
  • Conventions (e.g. plant and animal identification key)
  • Graphs (e.g. pictograph, histogram)
  • Tables (e.g. plant and animal classification tables)

Exploration strategies

  • Studying a problem or a phenomenon from different points of view
  • Distinguishing between the different types of information useful for solving the problem
  • Recalling similar problems that have already been solved
  • Becoming aware of his or her previous representations
  • Drawing a diagram for the problem or illustrating it 
  • Formulating questions 
  • Putting forward hypotheses
  • Exploring various ways of solving the problem 
  • Anticipating the results of his or her approach 
  • Imagining solutions to a problem in light of his or her explanations
  • Taking into account the constraints involved in solving a problem or making an object
  • Examining his or her mistakes in order to identify their source
  • Using different types of reasoning (e.g. induction, deduction, inference, comparison, classification)
  • Using empirical approaches (e.g. trial and error, analysis, exploration using one’s senses
  • Using different sources of information
  • Validating sources of information

Suggestions for Using Information and Communications Technologies

  • Using the Internet to access Web sites related to science and technology

Social Sciences

Canadian Society Around 1820

  • Elements of continuity with the present
    • Parliamentary government, canals, forestry industry, townships, presence of anglophones

Researching and Working with Information in Geography and History

  • Defining the problem
  • Drawing on previous learnings
  • Considering research strategies that will lead to a solution
  • Selecting useful questions
  • Locating sources of information
  • Distinguishing between facts and opinions
  • Criticizing data

Techniques Specific to Geography

  • Reading maps
  • Interpreting maps
  • Using spatial reference points
  • Orienting a map
  • Locating a place on a map, on a globe of the world, in an atlas
  • Interpreting illustrated documents (illustrations, sketches, posters, etc.)
  • Interpreting climate charts

Physical Education and Health

Lifestyle Habits

  • Mental relaxation

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

Cross-Curricular Competencies

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with the Cross-Curricular Competencies. This includes (but not limited to):

  • To gather information. To select appropriate information sources. To compare information from different sources. To make connections between what they already know and new information. To distinguish between essential and secondary information.
  • To recognize various information sources. To explore various sources and understand the use of each. To question information sources.
  • To put information to use. To imagine possible uses. To formulate questions. To answer his/her questions using the information gathered. To consider new uses. To respect copyright. To use the information in new contexts.
  • To analyze the components of a situational problem. To identify the context and the main elements of the situational problem and to make connections among them. To recognize similarities to situational problems solved previously
  • To adopt a flexible approach. To redo the preceding steps in the same or a different order as many times as necessary in order to solve the problem.
  • To test a solution. To choose a possible solution, apply it and evaluate its effectiveness. To choose and test another possible solution if necessary.
  • To formulate possible solutions. To list and classify possible solutions. To consider the appropriateness of each solution. To consider its requirements and consequences. To imagine the situational problem solved.
  • To evaluate the procedure used. To review the steps taken. To identify successful strategies and analyze the difficulties encountered.
  • To master the information and communications technologies. To be familiar with the purposes, concepts, vocabulary, procedures and techniques of ICT. To recognize familiar concepts in a new context. To explore new functions of software programs and operating systems.
  • To evaluate his/her use of information and communications technologies. To recognize his/her successes and difficulties. To identify the limitations of the technology employed in a given situation. To identify ways to improve his/her use of ICT.
  • To use information and communications technologies to carry out a task. To explore the potential of ICT for a given task. To choose software programs and functions appropriate for the task. To use appropriate working and troubleshooting strategies.

Science and Technology

Living Things

  • Characteristics of living things:
    • metabolism of plants and animals (e.g. nutrition, respiration, growth, death)
    • reproduction of plants and animals
  • Interaction between living organisms and their environment
    • adaptation (e.g. mimicry)
  • Terminology related to an understanding of living things
  • Conventions (e.g. plant and animal identification key)
  • Graphs (e.g. pictograph, histogram)
  • Tables (e.g. plant and animal classification tables)

Exploration strategies

  • Studying a problem or a phenomenon from different points of view
  • Distinguishing between the different types of information useful for solving the problem
  • Recalling similar problems that have already been solved
  • Becoming aware of his or her previous representations
  • Drawing a diagram for the problem or illustrating it 
  • Formulating questions 
  • Putting forward hypotheses
  • Exploring various ways of solving the problem 
  • Anticipating the results of his or her approach 
  • Imagining solutions to a problem in light of his or her explanations
  • Taking into account the constraints involved in solving a problem or making an object
  • Examining his or her mistakes in order to identify their source
  • Using different types of reasoning (e.g. induction, deduction, inference, comparison, classification)
  • Using empirical approaches (e.g. trial and error, analysis, exploration using one’s senses
  • Using different sources of information
  • Validating sources of information

Suggestions for Using Information and Communications Technologies

  • Using the Internet to access Web sites related to science and technology

Social Sciences

Canadian Society Around 1820

  • Elements of continuity with the present
    • Parliamentary government, canals, forestry industry, townships, presence of anglophones

Researching and Working with Information in Geography and History

  • Defining the problem
  • Drawing on previous learnings
  • Considering research strategies that will lead to a solution
  • Selecting useful questions
  • Locating sources of information
  • Distinguishing between facts and opinions
  • Criticizing data

Techniques Specific to Geography

  • Reading maps
  • Interpreting maps
  • Using spatial reference points
  • Orienting a map
  • Locating a place on a map, on a globe of the world, in an atlas
  • Interpreting illustrated documents (illustrations, sketches, posters, etc.)
  • Interpreting climate charts

Physical Education and Health

Lifestyle Habits

  • Mental relaxation

Mathematics

Arithmetic: Understanding and Writing Numbers

  • fractions: reading, writing, numerator, denominator, various representations, order, comparison, equivalent expressions, equivalent fractions
  • percentages

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

Cross-Curricular Competencies & Integrative Project

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with the Cross-Curricular Competencies, as well as the Integrative Project. This includes (but not limited to):

  • Systematizes the information-gathering process 
    • Establishes research strategies
    • Determines the pertinence of information
    • Identifies the value of each piece of information
  • Gathers information
    • Selects appropriate information sources
    • Compares information from different sources
    • Evaluates the validity of information according to criteria
    • Makes connections between what he/she already knows and new information
    • Distinguishes between essential and secondary information
    • Seeks further information
  • Puts information to use
    • Answers his/her questions, using the information gathered
    • Compares his/her new learning with previous learning
    • Uses information in new contexts
  • Tests possible solutions
    • Considers the appropriateness of each solution and its requirements and consequences
    • Chooses a possible solution, applies it and evaluates its effectiveness
    • Chooses and tests another possible solution if necessary
  • Forms an opinion
    • Defines the question under consideration. Weighs the logical, ethical or aesthetic issues involved
    • Goes back to the facts, verifies their accuracy and puts them in context
  • Uses appropriate technologies
    • Carries out various tasks using technological resources
    • Evaluates the potential of the available technologies and networks
  • Takes full advantage of these technologies
    • Takes advantage of ICT resources and functions in various types of learning
  • Evaluates his/her use of this technology
    • Examines the relevance of using ICT by taking into account their contribution to specific tasks

 


Science and Technology

The Living World

Diversity of life forms

  • Compulsory Concepts
    • Species
    • Population
    • Physical and behavioral adaptation
    • Taxonomy
  • Possible Cultural References
    • Linnaeus
    • International treaties on environmental protection

Survival of Species

  • Compulsory Concepts
    • Asexual and sexual reproduction
    • Sexually transmitted diseases

Life-sustaining Processes

  • Compulsory Concepts
    • Characteristics of living things
    • Cellular components visible under a microscope
  • Possible Cultural References
    • History of vaccination 

Geography

Understands the organization of a territory

  • Uses reference points to understand territorial organization

Interprets a territorial issue

  • Describes the complexity of the territorial issue
    • Identifies the places, scales and actors involved
    • Recognizes the motives of the groups involved
    • Specifies the role of certain natural and human factors of the past and present

Constructs his/her consciousness of global citizenship

  • Shows the global nature of a geographic phenomenon
    • Observes that a given geographic phenomenon occurs in many territories
    • Recognizes instances of inequality and mutual benefit among territories
  • Examines human actions in terms of the future
    • Shows that actions taken by human beings in a territory have repercussions on other territories
  • Evaluates solutions to global issues
    • Recognizes possible solutions
    • Shows that the commitment of communities is essential for solving global problems

History and Citizenship Education

Constructs his/her consciousness of citizenship through the study of history

  • Considers the factors that govern social participation
    • Makes connections between human action and social change
    • Recognizes the types of actions possible
    • Identifies opportunities for social participation
  • Understands the purpose of public institutions
    • Examines the nature, origin and operation of public institutions
    • Grasps the role of these institutions

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

Cross-Curricular Competencies

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with the Cross-Curricular Competencies. This includes (but not limited to):

  • Systematizes the information-gathering process 
    • Establishes research strategies
    • Determines the pertinence of information
    • Uses many sources of information and cross-checks the information obtained
  • Gathers information
    • Selects appropriate information sources
    • Identifies the value of each piece of information
    • Evaluates the validity of information according to criteria
    • Distinguishes between essential and secondary information
  • Puts information to use
    • Answers his/her questions, using the information gathered
    • Compares his/her new learning with previous learning
    • Uses information in new contexts
  • Tests possible solutions
    • Considers the appropriateness of each solution and its requirements and consequences
    • Chooses a possible solution, applies it and evaluates its effectiveness
    • Chooses and tests another possible solution if necessary
  • Forms an opinion
    • Defines the question under consideration. Weighs the logical, ethical or aesthetic issues involved
    • Goes back to the facts, verifies their accuracy and puts them in context
  • Qualifies his/her opinion
    • Recognizes his/her biases
    • Reconsiders his/her position
  • Evaluates his/her use of the technologies
    • Defines the possibilities and limits of ICT
    • Considers the relevance of using ICT for specific tasks

Applied Science and Technology

The Technological World

Biotechnology

  • Orientations
    • The main goal of vaccination is to enable the body to produce certain natural biological agents, thereby improving the organism’s defence against identified pathogenic elements.
  • Compulsory Concepts
    • Manufacture of vaccines

Systems - Nutrition

Circulatory and respiratory systems

  • Orientations
    • The immune system allows the human organism to defend itself against viruses, bacteria and other extracellular threats. Active immunity can be acquired naturally (production of antibodies) or artificially (vaccination).
    • The discovery and production of vaccines helped eradicate serious diseases such as smallpox and control the propagation of the influenza virus. New DNA-based vaccines may revolutionize the treatment of metabolic diseases such as diabetes
  • Compulsory Concepts
    • Lymphatic system (lymph, antibodies)
  • Cultural References
    • Jonas Salk, World Health Organization, Directions régionales de la santé publique, Vaccination

Systems - Relationships

Nervous and musculoskeletal systems

  • The sensory and motor divisions of the peripheral nervous system ensure homeostasis.

Geography

Understands the organization of a territory

  • Uses reference points to understand territorial organization

Interprets a territorial issue

  • Describes the complexity of the territorial issue
    • Identifies the places, scales and actors involved
    • Recognizes the motives of the groups involved
    • Specifies the role of certain natural and human factors of the past and present

Constructs his/her consciousness of global citizenship

  • Shows the global nature of a geographic phenomenon
    • Observes that a given geographic phenomenon occurs in many territories
    • Recognizes instances of inequality and mutual benefit among territories
  • Examines human actions in terms of the future
    • Shows that actions taken by human beings in a territory have repercussions on other territories
  • Evaluates solutions to global issues
    • Recognizes possible solutions
    • Shows that the commitment of communities is essential for solving global problems

History of Québec and Canada

Origins to 1608

  • First occupants of the territory
  • First contacts

Specific Concepts

  • Constitution
  • Parliamentary government

1840-1896 - The formation of the Canadian federal system

  • Federal-provincial relations

From 1980 to our times - Societal choices in contemporary Québec

  • Globalization of the economy
  • International relations
  • Information era

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade



All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Québec curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. There are also lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Contemporary World

Tensions and conflicts

  • External intervention in areas of tensions and conflict
  • Gives characteristics of areas of tension (e.g. divergent economic, political and social interests of players; absence of armed conflict)
  • Locates, on a world map, countries in which armed conflicts are under way (e.g. in 2012, Afghanistan, Libya, Syria)
  • Names players in areas of tension and conflict (e.g. states, United Nations [UN], NATO, non-governmental organizations)
  • Indicates reasons cited for intervening in a sovereign territory (e.g. threat to world peace; humanitarian crisis following a natural disaster or an armed conflict; population threatened by crimes against humanity, genocide or war crimes)

Biology / Anatomy & Physiology / Biophysics

Some Secondary 5 and all Cégep biology courses cover homeostasis in various detail.


 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

Last modified: 
Sep 8, 2020