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Nova Scotia Guide, Outcomes, and Lessons

Kids Boost Immunity matches the Nova Scotia curriculum outcomes listed below. You can also read a description of the core lessons available for Nova Scotia students. Each grade has a tailored selection of lessons that fit their curricular need. Please note that this is not an exhaustive list of the curricular fit - teachers on KBI have found many more curriculum connections than outlined here!

After reading the information below, check out the Teacher Centre where support materials, especially for lessons, are added throughout the year. These include lesson plans, student worksheets, marking rubrics, inquiry activities, etc. 

When you are ready to assess students, it is easy to monitor and report on individual student participation and efforts on quizzes. See instructions here (you must be logged in)

Continue scrolling down to see a short description of the core lessons available for each grade.

For grades with a renewed curriculum, the curriculum match is listed below the current/previous curriculum.

Guide For Using KBI With Grade 4

When using KBI at the grade 4 level it is best to lead students through individual lessons to explain unfamiliar words as needed and ask questions to check for understanding. Then work through each lesson quiz together. After completing the quiz together as a class students are able to reinforce their learning by reviewing lessons and doing quizzes on their own.

Use a CROSS-CURRICULAR Approach For SOCIAL STUDIES, HEALTH EDUCATION, and ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS

For grade 4, a cross-curricular approach for social studies, health and English language arts is best because the curriculum topics integrate well together. In social studies, lessons cover Canada’s political structure, analysis of factors that motivate exploration over time (e.g., a cure for a disease), and building awareness of longitude and latitude as a continuation of exploration over time. This transitions easily into health where students can study self care and disease prevention. Students can then explore disease prevention further and build core competencies in English language arts at the same time by completing lessons on critical thinking and evaluating online information.

Select Lessons To Meet Diverse Learning Needs

Some content requires strong literacy skills beyond what would be expected of a grade 4 level. Therefore, it is left to the teacher’s discretion to select key lessons within a lesson section to best meet diverse learning needs. For example, in the Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information section it may work best to only do the first two or three lessons with a whole class. The benefit of having the additional lessons is that it may work well to support students who need more of a challenge. For example, those that finish their work quickly can work independently on other KBI lessons in that section and see how they do.


All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Nova Scotia curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Social Studies

Unit 2: The Nature of Exploration

  • 4.2.1 examine the stories of various explorers of land, ocean, space, and ideas
    • Elaboration - Both the stories of explorers already studied, and additional stories, may be examined in terms of motivating factors. Were the explorations to meet particular needs (e.g., for land, a cure for a disease)?
  • 4.2.2 analyze factors that motivate exploration
  • 4.2.3 evaluate the impact of exploration over time
    • Suggestions for Learning and Teaching - record on a class chart the information they know about vaccines (As a class, develop questions about the discovery and uses of these vaccines that they want a medical professional to answer. Invite that person to visit the class and answer their questions. Add any new information to the class chart. Correct any misinformation.)

Unit 3: Exploring Our World

  • 4.3.1 Students will be expected to examine major physical features of the world.
    • Elaboration - Now students are introduced to hemispheres, poles, equator, and prime meridian, plus gain an awareness of longitude and latitude

Unit 4: Exploring the Landscapes of Canada

  • 4.4.3 Students will be expected to describe the political landscape of Canada.
    • Enduring Understanding - Canada is a country comprising provinces and territories  Canada has a central, federal government  the Federal government makes decisions and laws for the entire country in areas for which it has responsibility

Health Education

  • 4.2.2 Students will be expected to demonstrate an awareness of the link between positive selfidentity and making healthy decisions that affect relationships and care of self
    • Elaboration - It is important to note that understanding who we are, what we value, and being able to see ourselves in a positive light is relational to the many decisions that we make which enhance the health of self and the health of relationships that surround us across all health areas (mental and emotional health, substance use and gambling, physical activity, healthy eating, sexual health, and injury and disease prevention).

English Language Arts

Reading and Writing 

Rationale 
Learners use the research process to gather reliable information, question source(s) of information, and use this information to broaden understanding. The research process allows learners to gain insight into various topics.

Indicators
▪ Select relevant, dependable sources of information, with guidance
▪ Interpret relevant information from selected sources, with guidance

Ways to Gather Information
▪ How can you determine if information is fact or opinion? 
▪ How can you determine what information is most important? 

Rationale 
Learners interact with various texts by sharing, supporting, or challenging ideas. Learners make connections and react to texts from and through multiple perspectives. By critically responding to texts, new understandings emerge.

Indicators
▪ Begin to ask critical-thinking questions to clarify understanding, with guidance 
▪ Explore and discuss the message(s) of the author 
▪ Begin to develop an awareness of stereotyping, bias, and/or prejudice, with guidance 
▪ Begin to respond to stereotyping, bias, and/or prejudice, with guidance 
▪ Recognize authors’ viewpoints, providing evidence from the text and personal experiences


 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

Guide For Using KBI With Grade 5

When using KBI at the grade 5 level it is best to lead students through individual lessons to explain unfamiliar words as needed and ask questions to check for understanding. Then work through each lesson quiz together. After completing the quiz together students are able to reinforce their learning by reviewing lessons and doing quizzes on their own.

Use a CROSS-CURRICULAR Approach For SCIENCE/ HEALTH, SOCIAL STUDIES, and ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS

For grade 5, a cross-curricular approach for science/health social studies, and English language arts is best because the curriculum topics integrate well together. Life science: maintaining a healthy body examines body systems related to health issues which ties into prevention of common chronic and communicable diseases through good hygiene practices, proper use of antibiotics, understanding how the body’s immune system works and how vaccines can help; included in the lessons is an Indigenous perspective lesson called The Hummingbird Vaccine. Communicable disease is also a topic within social studies making it relevant to look at indigenous perspectives around diseases such as smallpox, influenza, and measles.  A cumulative activity for English language arts builds core competencies in critical thinking as students learn how to evaluate information found online.

Select Lessons To Meet Diverse Learning Needs

Some content requires strong literacy skills beyond what would be expected of a grade 5 level. Therefore, it is left to the teacher’s discretion to select key lessons within a lesson section to best meet diverse learning needs. For example, in the Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information section it may work best to only do the first two or three lessons with a whole class. The benefit of having the additional lessons is that it may work well to support students who need more of a challenge. For example, those that finish their work quickly can work independently on other KBI lessons in that section and see how they do.


All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Nova Scotia curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Science

Life Science: Meeting Basic Needs and Maintaining a Healthy Body

STSE

  • 106-2,106-4,107-12,107-14 - describe examples of medical techniques and technologies developed by Canadians and other cultures that have contributed to the knowledge of body organisms, systems, and health issues.

Skills

206-4, 302-9 - describe nutritional and other requirements for maintaining a healthy body and evaluate the usefulness of different information sources in answering questions about health and diet.

Knowledge

  • 302-8, 302-7 - describe the body’s defences, such as tears, saliva, skin, certain blood cells, and stomach secretions, against infections and describe the role of the skin

Social Studies

Unit 5: Interactions

5.5.1 Examine interactions between British and French and First Nations and Inuit in what later became Atlantic Canada

  • Elaboration - While the negative consequences of interactions are essential to this study, such as the introduction of devastating diseases – small pox, influenza, and measles, it is also important to recognize the positive interactions. These include technological and medical contributions of First Nations and Inuit to the British and French, such as the use of various botanicals for healing and technologies such as snow goggles.

5.6.1 Illustrate the similarities and differences of past societies and your society

  • Decision-making - Just as past societies engaged in decision making, our society makes decisions such as rules and laws.
  • Interactions - Like societies of the past, our society interacts with other societies. This is evident by the importance our society places on multiculturalism.

Health Education

  • 2.1 Students will be expected to demonstrate an awareness of, and ways to prevent common chronic and communicable diseases, including HIV, Hepatitis B and C, and the potential impact of disease on the lives of themselves and their families.
    • Elaboration - Many communicable diseases can be prevented by practicing good personal hygiene, proper handwashing, food safety, and not sharing bodily fluids. Also, antibiotics may help fight off bacterial infections, and anti-viral medications work well for some viruses. Vaccinations are also important in the fight against infectious diseases. Vaccines introduce a small amount of a dead virus into the body in order to trigger the immune system to make antibodies and fight the infection, even though the virus is already dead. In this way, if the live virus enters the body, the immune system will already recognize it and will be able to protect you.

English Language Arts

Reading and Writing

Rationale
Learners use the research process to gather reliable information, question source(s) of information, and use this information to broaden understanding. The research process allows learners to gain insight into various topics.

Indicators

  • Select relevant dependable sources of information, with beginning independence
  • Interpret relevant information from selected sources, with beginning independence

Ways to Gather Information

  • How do I know if information is from a reliable source?
  • How can you select information from various sources that is relevant to your topic?

Rationale 
Learners interact with various texts by sharing, supporting, or challenging ideas. Learners make connections and react to texts from and through multiple perspectives. By critically responding to texts, new understandings emerge.

Indicators

  • Begin to ask critical-thinking questions to clarify understanding, with guidance 
  • Explore and discuss the message(s) of the author 
  • Begin to develop an awareness of stereotyping, bias, and/or prejudice, with guidance 
  • Begin to respond to stereotyping, bias, and/or prejudice, with guidance 
  • Recognize authors’ viewpoints, providing evidence from the text and personal experiences
     

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

Guide For Using KBI With Grade 6

At the grade 6 level it may be best to lead students through one or more individual lessons to explain unfamiliar words as needed and ask questions to check for understanding. Then work through some of the lesson quizzes together. After this students are able to reinforce their learning by reviewing lessons and doing quizzes on their own. Once they have done a few quizzes students should feel confident enough to work more independently.

For grade 6 there is a substantial amount of cross-curricular content within the different lesson sections. Teachers can get the class directed and focused on a new subject topic by working through the first lesson or two together. Check for materials (lesson plans, student worksheets, marking criteria) in the Teacher Centre designed to support students’ to process information and engage in inquiry as they work independently on a lesson section.

Use a CROSS-CURRICULAR Approach For SCIENCE/ HEALTH, SOCIAL STUDIES, and ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS

For grade 6, a cross-curricular approach for science/health, social studies and English language arts works well because of the many relevant lesson topics. Life science: diversity of life explores how technological innovations have been developed to protect against unwanted microorganisms. The lesson progresses into understanding the role of a commonly used classification system, specifically looking at animals and plants. Then in social studies students explore world issues such as the distribution of wealth and quality of life that can be affected by such things as poverty, war, and misinformation. Global citizenship ties into the unique opportunity for students to help others in need by earning vaccines through UNICEF when they answer quiz questions. There is also a math related inquiry activity involving percentage problems with a student workbook. English language arts core competencies in critical thinking are developed in learning how to evaluate online information/misinformation.

Select Lessons To Meet Diverse Learning Needs

Some content requires strong literacy skills beyond what might be expected of a grade 6 level. Therefore, it is left to the teacher’s discretion to select key lessons within a lesson section to best meet diverse learning needs. For example, in the Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information section it may work best to only do the first four lessons with a whole class. The benefit of having the additional lessons is that it may work well to support students who need more of a challenge. For example, those that finish their work quickly can work independently on other KBI lessons in that section and see how they do.


All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Nova Scotia curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Science

Life Science: Diversity of Life

STSE

  • 107-3, 107-6 provide examples of how science and technology have been used in identifying and controlling micro-organisms by different people around the world
    • Elaborations - Students could discuss examples of technological innovations that have been developed to protect against unwanted micro-organisms (such as cleaning solutions, processed lunch packages, canned goods, preserving jars, and antibacterial hygienic products like toothpaste, creams, and soaps). In the section Adaptations and Natural Selection, the impact of using antibacterial products may be discussed again. These activities provide an excellent opportunity for students to appreciate and connect the role and contribution of science and technology in their lives.

Skills

  • 205-8, 300-18 classify common arthropods using a variety of sources
  • 206-1, 206-9, 300-15 create and analyse their own chart or diagram for classifying and describe the role of a common classification system

Knowledge

  • 300-16, 300-17 classify animals as vertebrates or invertebrates and compare the characteristics of mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and fishes
  • 301-15, 104-5, 204-6 classify and compare the adaptations of closely related animals and plants living in their local habitat and in different parts of the world and discuss reasons for any differences

Social Studies

Unit 5: World Issues

6.5.1 Analyse the effects of the distribution of wealth around the world

  • Use statistical data to represent the distribution of wealth around the world
  • Examine the effects of the uneven distrubiton of wealth on quality of life
  • Define poverty and give examples of its effects

6.5.2 Examine selected examples of human rights issues around the world

  • Identify human rights issues related to rights of children

6.5.3 Take age-appropriate actions to demonstrate an understanding of responsibilities as global citizens

  • Explain the rights and responsibilities of being a global citizen
  • Support a position on local/national/international issue after considering various perspectives
  • Plan and take age-appropriate actions to address local/national/international problems or issues

Health Education

  • 3.2 Students will be expected to take age-appropriate action to present mental health issues faced among school-aged children in order to reduce the stigma that is often attached to mental health disorders.

English Language Arts

Listening and Speaking

Rationale
Learners develop their oral language skills through varied experiences. They need multiple opportunities to practise listening and speaking, asking and responding

Audience and Purpose 

  • What might be your reasons for communicating with someone?(to inform, entertain, amuse, persuade)


Reading and Viewing

Rationale
Learners use the research process to gather reliable information, question source(s) of
information, and use this information to broaden understanding. The research process allows
learners to gain insight into various topics.

Indicators

  • Select relevant, dependable sources of information, with growing Independence

Ways to Gather Information

  • How do you know if information is from a reliable source?

Rationale 
Learners interact with various texts by sharing, supporting, or challenging ideas. Learners make connections and react to texts from and through multiple perspectives. By critically responding to texts, new understandings emerge.

Indicators

  • Ask critical-thinking questions to clarify understanding, with increasing independence 
  • Recognize stereotyping, bias, and/or prejudice, with guidance

Mathematics

SCO: N6: Demonstrate an understanding of percent (limited to whole numbers) concretely, pictorially and symbolically. [C, CN, PS, R, V]


 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

Guide For Using KBI With Grade 7

At the grade 7 level it may be best to lead students through one or more individual lessons to explain unfamiliar words as needed and ask questions to check for understanding. Then work through some of the lesson quizzes together. After this students are able to reinforce their learning by reviewing lessons and doing quizzes on their own. Once they have done a few quizzes students should feel confident enough to work more independently.

For grade 7 there is a substantial amount of cross-curricular content within the different lesson sections. Teachers can get the class directed and focused on a new subject topic by working through the first lesson or two together. Check for materials (lesson plans, student worksheets, marking criteria) in the Teacher Centre designed to support students to process information and engage in inquiry.

Use a CROSS-CURRICULAR Approach For SCIENCE, SOCIAL STUDIES, HEALTH and ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS

For grade 7, a cross-curricular approach for science, social studies, health and English language arts works well because of the many relevant lesson topics. Life science: interactions with ecosystems looks at biological classification systems that explain the diversity of life on earth.  Then in social studies students explore both economic and political empowerment through the lens of poverty, war, and misinformation, along with examining Canada’s three levels of government. In the area of health there is substantial content on communicable disease prevention. In English language arts, core competencies in critical thinking are developed through learning how to evaluate online information/misinformation.

Select Lessons To Meet Diverse Learning Needs

Some content requires strong literacy skills. Therefore, it is left to the teacher’s discretion to select key lessons within a lesson section to best meet diverse learning needs. The benefit of having the additional lessons is that it may work well to support students who need more of a challenge. For example, those that finish their work quickly can work independently on other KBI lessons in a section and see how they do.


All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Nova Scotia curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Science

Life Science: Interactions with Ecosystems

STSE

  • 109-1, 109-12 distinguish and explain the terms and characteristics used in classification in an ecosystem

Knowledge

  • (304-1) explain how biological classification takes into account the diversity of life on Earth, using the terms producer, consumer, and decomposer

Social Studies

Unit 2: Economic Empowerment

7.1.1 explore the general concept of empowerment:

  • Define power and authority and explain how each influences their own lives
  • Identify and categorize various sources of power and authority
  • Identify groups that are empowered and disempowered in our society (local, national, and global)

7.2.2 Investigate the various ways economic systems empower or disempower people

  • explain that people have basic needs that must be met
  • analyze the role that money plays in meeting basic needs
  • investigate and report on the challenges of the poverty cycle

7.2.3 Analyze trends that could impact future economic empowerment 

  • identify current trends and examine factors that may impact on these trends
  • take actions which provide or enable personal economic empowerment in the future

Unit 3: Political Empowerment

7.3.4 Examine the political structure of Canada as a result of Confederation

  • chart the structure of the Canadian government after Confederation
  • compare and contrast the power given to the different levels of government by the BNA Act
  • explain the role of the individual in the democratic process in Canada

Healthy Living 7

7.7 Students will be expected to identify ways of maintaining sexual health.

  • that there are positive and negative aspects of sexual health – it is not just the absence of disease and pregnancy

English Language Arts

Reading and Viewing

SCO 7.1: recognize that print and non-print texts can be biased and become aware of some of the ways that information is organized and structured to suit a particular point of view

Instructional links to: Reading and Viewing SCO 5.1
Speaking and Listening SCO 2.3 and 3.3
Writing and Representing SCO 9.4

Information and Communication Technology Key-stage Outcomes: SEHI 9.2, CT 9.3, RPSD 9.4 and 9.5

  • identify how a writer’s word choice can be used to bias or influence the reader or viewer  differentiate between fact and opinion
  • teach students how to check for bias and stereotypes  explicitly teach students to differentiate between fact and opinion 

 

 

Renewed Curriculum


Science

Outcome: Learners will investigate factors that affect species adaptation and evolution

Concepts (and Guiding Questions) Classification

  • How can organisms be grouped?
  • How does classification help us learn about organisms?

Social Studies

Outcome: Learners will create a response to changing societal conditions in the Maritimes.

Advocacy and Impact on Changing Social Conditions

  • Why does everyone have a social responsibility to stand up for others?
  • What are appropriate ways to stand up for others?

Healthy Living 7

Outcome: Learners will analyse the relationships between health behaviours and physical, mental, emotional, social, and spiritual health

Indicators

  • Investigate healthy behaviours for using new technologies and media (CZ, CT, PCD, TF)
  • Compare ways for preventing the spread of communicable diseases (CZ, CT, PCD)

Healthy Behaviours for Technology

  • How can technology be used in a healthy way?
  • How do I determine the safety concerns of technology?
  • How do I recognize the safety concerns of social media?

Communicable Disease Prevention

  • Why is it important to know how diseases are spread?
  • Why are disease prevention methods important?
  • Why is it important to know how to prevent the spread of communicable diseases?

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade





Guide For Using KBI With Grade 8

At the grade 8 level it may be best to lead students through one or more individual lessons to explain unfamiliar words as needed and ask questions to check for understanding. Then work through some of the lesson quizzes together. After this students are able to reinforce their learning by reviewing lessons and doing quizzes on their own. Once they have done a few quizzes students should feel confident enough to work more independently.

For grade 8 there is a substantial amount of cross-curricular content within the different lesson sections. Teachers can get the class directed and focused on a new subject topic by working through the first lesson or two together. Check for materials (lesson plans, student worksheets, marking criteria) in the Teacher Centre designed to support students to process information and engage in inquiry.

Use a CROSS-CURRICULAR approach for SCIENCE, SOCIAL STUDIES, HEALTH and ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS

A cross-curricular approach for science, social studies, health and English language arts works well because of the many relevant lesson topics. Life Science: cells, tissues, organs, and systems are explored through studying the characteristics of life, and critical thinking lessons cover the scientific method and factors involved in creating reliable experiments. Social studies content is broad and includes operations and responsibilities of government at the municipal, provincial, and federal levels, unique opportunities around global citizenship, Indigenous experiences and perspectives in Canada, and factors related to global inequality such as poverty, war, and misinformation. In the area of health there is substantial content on communicable disease prevention. English language arts core competencies in critical thinking are developed in learning how to evaluate online information/misinformation.

Select Lessons To Meet Diverse Learning Needs

Although lesson sections are designed sequentially with the intention of students doing all lessons, it is left to the teacher’s discretion to decide whether it is best to select key lessons within a lesson section to better meet diverse learning needs. Any additional lessons may work well to support students who need more of a challenge. For example, those that finish their work quickly can work independently on other KBI lessons.


All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Nova Scotia curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Science

Life Science: Cells, Tissues, Organs, and Systems

STSE

  • 109-13 explain the importance of choosing words that are scientifically or technologically appropriate
  • 110-2 distinguish between ideas used in the past and theories used today to explain natural phenomena
  • 110-5 illustrate examples of conflicting evidence for similar scientific questions
  • 111-5 describe the science underlying particular technologies designed to explore natural phenomena, extend human capabilities, or solve practical problem
  • 112-10 provide examples of science- and technology-based careers in their province or territory
  • 113-8 make informed decisions about applications of science and technology, taking into account personal and social advantages and disadvantages

Skills

  • 208-1 rephrase questions in a testable form and clearly define practical problems
  • 208-6 design an experiment and identify major variables
  • 209-1 carry out procedures controlling the major variables
  • 210-7 identify and suggest explanations for discrepancies in data

Knowledge

  • 304-4 illustrate and explain that the cell is a living system that exhibits all the characteristics of life

Social Studies

Unit 4: Citizenship

  • 8.4.1 Take age-appropriate actions that demonstrate the rights and responsibilities of citizenship (local, national, and global)
  • 8.4.3 Demonstrate an understanding of the structure and operation of government in Canada under a federal system
    • describe the operation and responsibilities of government at the municipal, provincial, and federal levels
    • demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between the provincial and federal governments and account for provincial and regional variations in this relationship

English Language Arts

Reading and Viewing

GCO 7: Students will be expected to respond critically to a range of texts, applying their
understanding of language, form, and genre. This is about recognizing, evaluating, and appreciating the way texts are crafted

SCO 7.1 recognize that texts need to be assessed for bias and broaden their understanding and awareness of the ways in which print and non-print texts can be biased; begin to question and think critically about the relevance and reliability of information when answering questions and inquiries


 

Renewed Curriculum


Science

Outcome: Learners will analyse how the characteristics of cells relate to the needs of organisms.


Social Studies

Outcome: Learners will reflect on the 20th and 21st century Indigenous experiences in Canada

Diversity within Indigenous communities

  • In what ways are Indigenous populations diverse across Canada?
  • Why is it important to understand the diversity of Indigenous peoples in Canada?

Impact of Residential Schools

  • How have residential schools impacted and continue to impact Indigenous peoples and communities?

Outcome: Learners will evaluate the impact of equity and inequity in a changing Canadian society.

Factors that Influence Equity and Inequity

  • Why do some groups experience inequity and inequality more than others?
  • How does society disrupt patterns of inequity and inequality?
  • What factors of inequity and inequality exist in my own community, province, country?

Outcome: Learners will formulate responses to change in Canadian society

Technological Advances

  • How can an event, idea or issue become a catalyst for technological change?
  • How is changing technology impacting my life?

Outcome: Learners will plan an advocacy action in response to an issue.

Forms of Advocacy  

  • Why is it important to consider the perspectives of those impacted by the issue when considering which form of advocacy to take?

Impacts of a Current Issue

  • How does the issue impact various groups?
  • What is the impact of this issue over time?

Healthy Living 8

Outcome: Learners will analyse the relationships between health behaviours and physical, mental, emotional, social, and spiritual health

Indicators

  • Investigate healthy behaviours for using new technologies and media (CZ, CT, PCD, TF)
  • Compare ways for preventing the spread of communicable diseases (CZ, CT, PCD)

Communicable Disease Prevention

  • Why is it important to know how diseases are spread?
  • Why are disease prevention methods important?
  • Why is it important to know how to prevent the spread of communicable diseases?
  • Why is it important to be aware of the information shared regarding vaccines?
  • How do vaccines impact community health?

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Nova Scotia curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Science

Cellular Processes

Elaborations–Strategies for Learning and Teaching - "A possible opening to this unit is to call upon students to observe, note, and report differences and similarities among members of their class or families....Another possible context for investigation is a study of diseases, their causes, and controls."


Citizenship 9

Digital Citizenship

Learners will evaluate how perceptions of current issues are influenced by various media, and how this shapes actions, choices, and reactions.

  • Analyse how social and mass media impact the awareness of certain issues (CZ/COM/CT/TF)
  • Investigate how citizens’ and governments’ choices can be affected by different media (CZ/COM/CT/TF)

Learners will evaluate risks, rights, and responsibilities of digital citizens.

  • Evaluate the opportunities and risks of being digitally engaged or connected (COM/PCD/CT/TF)
  • Investigate how a digital footprint influences others’ perceptions (CZ/PCD/TF)
  • Investigate the role of anonymity in both the production and consumption of media (COM/PCD/CT/TF)

Governance

Learners will investigate the structure, operation, and selection of government in Canada, including federal, provincial, territorial, indigenous, and municipal government models.

  • Investigate how various types of governments in Canada are formed (CZ/COM/TF)

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Nova Scotia curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Nova Scotia curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Biology 11 / Advanced Biology / IB Biology

Biodiversity

Classifying Living Things 

  • describe and apply classification systems and nomenclatures used in the biological science (214-1)
  • use organisms found in local or regional ecosystems to demonstrate an understanding of the fundamental principles of taxonomy (316-5)
  • analyze and describe examples where scientific knowledge evolved, was enhanced, or revised as a result of new laws, theories, and/or technologies (115-7, 116-2)

Diversity among Living Things

  • construct arguments to support a decision or judgment, using examples and evidence, recognizing various perspectives (118-6)
  • describe the anatomy and physiology of a representative organism from each kingdom, including a representative virus (316-6)
  • analyze and explain the life cycle of a representative organism from each kingdom, including a representative virus (313-1)

Maintaining Dynamic Equilibrium

Homeostatis

  • explain the importance of nutrition and fitness to the maintenance of homeostatis, debating the merits of funding specific scientific or technological endeavours and not others (117-4, 317-3)
  • explain, with specific examples, how behaviours such as tropisms, instinct, and learned, help to maintain homeostasis and identify multiple perspectives that influence a decision/issue (215-4, 317- 8)

Body Systems

Note: Biology 11 requires that a minimum of two (2) of the following five body systems be investigated in detail—circulatory, respiratory, digestive, excretory, and immune systems.

  • design and perform experiments, identifying specific variables, to investigate how body systems work based on scientific understandings (212-6, 116-4)
  • identify and predict the impact of viruses, diseases, and environmental factors on the homeostasis of an organism and propose alternate solutions (317-4, 317-6, 214-15)
  • Students will be expected to explain how different plant and animal system maintain homeostasis (317-1) Note: Immune System
  • Elaborations - Students should discuss that a properly functioning immune system is essential for health and well being and recognize the consequences that result when the immune system does not function properly... A study of the non-specific first line defences would include both physical and chemical barriers such as skin, tears, mucous, cilia, sweat, and stomach acids. The inflammatory response and phagocytes as second line defenders and the immune response involving lymphocytes such as T-cells (initiated by a virus-infected cell or tumour cell), and B cells (initiated by bacteria) and antibody production should be summarized... Students should expand their study by investigating how vaccines make use of the workings of the immune system in order to be effective and by studying the requirements, interest, and financial resources society has to support the prevention of the spread of disease-causing organisms such as HIV, Staphylococcus, and smallpox.

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Nova Scotia curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Biology 12 / AP Biology / IB Biology SL 12

Maintaining Dynamic Equilibrium 2

Endocrine System: Maintaining Homeostasis

Endocrine System: Feedback Mechanisms

  • analyze homeostatic phenomena to identify the feedback mechanisms involved (317-2)
  • analyze contributions, including Canadian, to science and technology and how these have improved over time (117-11, 115-5)

Global Geography 12

Unit 2: Perilous Processes: Our Planet at Risk

2.3 Peril and Threat: Human Processes

  • examining global perils and threats

Global History 12

Unit 5: Acknowledging Global Interdependence: The Legacy of the 20th Century?

  • The Impact of Global Communication [e.g., Satellite Technology and the Vietnam War (The Living Room War)] – International Scientific Co-operation (e.g., Antarctica)
  • Value Systems in Conflict (e.g., The Impact of Terrorism on an International Scale)

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

Dernière modification: 
22 décembre 2020