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Saskatchewan Resource Guide

Kids Boost Immunity matches the Saskatchewan curriculum outcomes listed below. You can also read a description of the core lessons available for Saskatchewan students. Each grade has a tailored selection of lessons that fit their curricular need. Please note that this is not an exhaustive list of the curricular fit - teachers on KBI have found many more curriculum connections than outlined here! Continue scrolling down to see a short description of the core lessons available for each grade.

 

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Saskatchewan curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Science

HC4.1 Investigate the interdependence of plants and animals, including humans, within habitats and communities. [CP, SI]

  • Discuss stories that demonstrate the interdependence of land, water, animals, plants, and the sky in traditional worldviews.
  • Draw upon facets of Indigenous worldviews, such as the Medicine Wheel or circle of life, to examine understanding about the interdependence of plants and animals in various habitats and communities.

Social Studies

IN4.3 Determine the influence Saskatchewan people and programs have had on a national scale.

  • Investigate the value of volunteerism in various local community organizations and activities.

DR4.2 Explain the relationship of First Nations and Métis peoples with the land.

  • Explore how the traditional worldviews and teachings of First Nations’ Elders regarding land influence the lifestyle of First Nations people today.

PA4.1 Analyze the relationship between governance institutions in Saskatchewan and the quality of life of people in the province.

  • Identify ways in which Saskatchewan people can be involved in making decisions which affect their local communities (e.g., run as a candidate for school board, local government, or band elections; vote during elections; attend community forums).
  • Describe ways in which Saskatchewan people can be involved in the democratic process regarding decisions which affect their province, and explain why it is important to be an active participant in the democratic process (e.g., vote in provincial elections; belong to a political party; run for member of the provincial or First Nations legislative assembly; communicate with the member of the legislative assembly about issues of concern).

PA4.2 Demonstrate an understanding of the provincial system of government.

  • Describe the relationship between three levels of government in Canada, including local (i.e., municipal, band), provincial or territorial, and federal.
  • Identify elected local, provincial, and federal heads of government.

Health Education

USC4.2 Illustrate how both traditional healing (including First Nations and Métis practices) and current Western medical advances have influenced the prevention and/or management of past and present health challenges (including mental health/ illness, HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis C, diabetes).

  • Investigate and distinguish points of view expressed about health opportunities and challenges, both past and present (e.g., management of illness/disease, tobacco legislation, obesity).
  • Explain how the mind, body, and spirit may be affected by health challenges (e.g., irritability, fatigue, motivation, depression).
  • Examine historical (including First Nations and Métis healing practices), contemporary (including technological), and complementary practices (e.g., inclusion of healing circles and sweat lodges along with counselling in the treatment of mental illness) for preventing/managing health challenges (including mental health/illness, HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis C, diabetes).
  • Examine basic costs to society when threats to health (i.e., mind, body, and spirit) are not prevented/managed.
  • Investigate the changes in practices (e.g., use of new plants in medications to replace those no longer available, use of technology) to prevent or manage health challenges.
  • Examine strategies to reduce the prevalence and the impact of potential current health challenges (e.g., immunity to antibiotics, pandemics, obesity, HIV/AIDS).

USC4.6 Assess healthy stress management strategies (e.g., relaxation skills, stress control skills, guided imagery, expressing feelings, exercising).

  • Analyze common coping strategies for managing stress.

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Saskatchewan curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Science

HB5.1 Analyze personal and societal requirements for, and the impact of, maintaining a healthy human body. [CP, DM]

  • Examine methods and perspectives of various cultures, including First Nations and Métis, which have contributed to knowledge about maintaining a healthy body (e.g., balance inherent in the Medicine Wheel).
  • Identify local knowledge, including the effects of traditional lifestyles, that contributes to human understanding of maintaining a healthy body.
  • Analyze the role of the skin (e.g., protection, heat regulation, absorption, and evaporation) in maintaining a healthy body.
  • Research how the body’s defences, such as tears, saliva, skin, certain blood cells, and stomach secretions, work to fight against infections.
  • Describe the function of technologies (e.g., defibrillator, soap, exercise equipment, and safety equipment) that have been developed to support personal health.
  • Relate the effects of common diseases to the organs or body systems they affect or are related to (e.g., heart attacks affect the circulatory system, epilepsy affects the nervous system, hepatitis affects the liver, gallstones affect the gall bladder, and asthma affects the respiratory system).
  • Research the roles of different individuals and organizations within their communities that help support personal and community health.

HB5.2 Investigate the structure, function, and major organs of one or more human body systems such as the digestive, excretory, respiratory, circulatory, nervous, muscular, and skeletal systems. [SI, TPS]

  • Suggest the processes that scientists might follow to investigate questions related to the structure and/or function of human body systems (e.g., Which factors affect breathing and heartbeat rate? How does the digestion process work? How much air do lungs hold? Why is blood red? Where does my food go?).
  • Rephrase, into a testable form, questions about the structure and/ or function of one or more body systems.
  • Design and carry out procedures, including identifying and controlling variables, to investigate the structure and/or function of one or more body systems (e.g., the influence of exercise on heart rate, the role of simulated saliva in starting the digestion process, and factors that influence a person’s response time).

Social Studies

IN5.1 Demonstrate an understanding of the Aboriginal heritage of Canada.

  • Investigate the significant events and principle First Nations and Inuit leaders prior to and during the period of initial contact with Europeans.

IN5.2 Analyze the evolution of Canada as a multicultural nation.

  • Differentiate between refugees and immigrants.
  • Explain what motivates newcomers to move to Canada (e.g., entrepreneurship, employment, family reunification, refuge, education, reputation as a good place to live)

PA5.2 Explain the purposes and functions of governance structures in Canada, including First Nations systems and those patterned on the Westminster parliamentary system.

  • Represent, in graphic format, the structure of various levels of government in Canada, including municipal, First Nations, provincial, territorial, and federal governments.
  • Develop an understanding of the functions of the following governance bodies and the role of those in leadership positions: House of Commons, Senate, Governor General, Prime Minister, member of the federal parliament, government minister.

Health Education

USC5.3 Analyze how infectious diseases (including HIV and Hepatitis C) and non-infectious illnesses/diseases challenge holistic well-being.

  • Identify examples of local, provincial, and national health sources regarding illness/disease
  • Discuss criteria that can be used to identify if a health source is reliable.
  • Investigate various sources of information about illness and disease (including cancers, diabetes, depression, and heart disease).
  • Distinguish between infectious and non-infectious, and illness and disease.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of ways in which the body protects itself from illness and disease (e.g., intact skin, understanding portals/openings of entry such as eyes and mouth, immune system).
  • Investigate and articulate how the physical, mental, emotional, and spirital well-being of self, family, and community is affected by illness and disease.
  • Ask questions and seek answers for deeper understanding:
    • Where do new diseases come from?
    • Why do people die from a disease when some people can be cured?
    • Why are some diseases more common in adults than in children and vice versa?

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Saskatchewan curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Science

DL6.1 Recognize, describe, and appreciate the diversity of living things in local and other ecosystems, and explore related careers. [CP, SI]

  • State the characteristics that define all living things(e.g., are made up of one or more cells, require energy forlife processes, respond to stimuli in their environment, and have the ability to reproduce).
  • Analyze how First Nations and Métis art and storytelling highlight movement and/or behaviour of living things and reflect a worldview that values all living things.

DL6.2 Examine how humans organize understanding of the diversity of living things.

  • Construct and use a classification system to organize living things into groups and subgroups according to studentdeveloped criteria.
  • Demonstrate how different classification systems can beused to classify the same set of objects and explain how humans develop and refine classification systems to meet specific needs.
  • Use appropriate scientific terminology to communicate ideas about the diversity of living things (e.g., biotic, abiotic, kingdom, phylum, monera, protist, fungi, plant, animal, vertebrate, and invertebrate).
  • Critique the use of biological classification systems to aid scientific understanding of living things rather than relying on common, local, or personally chosen names.

DL6.4 Examine and describe structures and behaviours that help: • individual living organisms survive in their environments in the short term • species of living organisms adapt to their environments in the long term.

  • Describe examples of structures and behaviours, including seasonal changes, which help living things survive in their environments during the lifetime of the organism.

DL6.5 Assess effects of micro-organisms on past and present society, and contributions of science and technology to human understanding of microorganisms. [CP, DM, SI]

  • Compare cultural (including First Nations and Métis), historical, and scientific understandings and explanations of disease, including the contributions of scientists such as John Snow and Louis Pasteur to the germ theory
  • Discuss positive and negative impacts of micro-organismsfor humans (e.g., food production and spoilage, fermentation, pasteurization, water and sewage treatment, human digestion, composting, disease spread and prevention, and biological warfare).

Social Studies

IN6.3 Develop an understanding that global interdependence impacts individual daily life in Canada and a selection of countries bordering the Atlantic Ocean.

  • Create an inventory of ways in which daily life is influenced by global interdependence.
  • Assess and interpret why people from a selection of countries bordering the Atlantic Ocean have chosen, or may choose, to immigrate to Canada.
  • Become aware and describe the role of key international agencies in protecting human welfare, especially that of children and youth (e.g., United Nations, UNICEF, UNESCO, Amnesty International, Médecins sans frontières, United Nations High Commission for Refugees, international indigenous organizations, faith-based international development organizations).
  • Investigate and represent the contribution of a Canadian individual or organization toward enhancing human welfare in Canada or in a selection of countries bordering the Atlantic Ocean.
  • Investigate and represent the contribution of an individual not born in Canada toward enhancing human welfare in Canada (e.g., neighbours, community members).
  • Investigate the contribution of an Aboriginal Canadian toward enhancing human welfare in Canada.

RW6.1 Examine and analyze factors that contribute to quality of life, including material and non-material factors.

  • Compare and contrast the needs and wants of Canadian youth with those of youth in a selection of countries bordering the Atlantic Ocean.
  • Explain factors that affect the quality of life of youth in Canada and a selection of countries bordering the Atlantic Ocean (e.g., labour practices, access to education and technology, shelter, food and water, health care, sport and recreation, inclusion, or marginalization).
  • Assess ways in which technology influences the quality of life for youth in Canada and in a selection of countries bordering the Atlantic Ocean (e.g., access to energy, transportation, and communication systems).
  • Compare and contrast the quality of life in Canada with the quality of life in a selection of countries bordering the Atlantic Ocean using various sources of data including a quality of life index, maps, graphs, and charts.
  • Propose reasons which might explain the differences in the quality of life of young people in Canada and in a selection of countries bordering the Atlantic Ocean.

RW6.2 Contribute to initiating and guiding change in local and global communities regarding environmental, social, and economic sustainability


Health Education

USC 6.1 Analyze the factors that influence the development of personal standards and identity, and determine the impact on healthy decision making (including cultural norms, societal norms, family values, peer pressures, mass media, traditional knowledge, white privilege, legacy of colonization, and heterosexual privilege).

  • Identify sources of, and evaluate information about, personal beliefs and values.
  • Analyze events or factors that cause people to make decisions that reflect or conflict with their personal standards

USC 6.3 Demonstrate an understanding of how noncurable and serious but treatable infections, including HIV and Hepatitis C infection, are transmitted and how these infections influence the health (i.e., physical, mental, emotional, spiritual) and the identities of self, family, and community.

  • Identify sources of, and evaluate information about, noncurable and serious but treatable infections, including HIV and Hepatitis C.
  • Discuss standard precautions/strategies to prevent the transmission of infectious diseases (e.g., washing hands, personal protective measures such as not sharing personal items, immunization, insect precautions, needle safety, avoiding other’s body fluids, condoms, sexual abstinence).
  • Describe ways that non-curable infectious diseases, including Hepatitis C and AIDS, are transmitted and explain ways to avoid and/or reduce the risk of infection/co-infection.
  • Perceive how beliefs in the myths and assumptions related to the transmission of infections diseases, including HIV/AIDS and Hepatitis C, affect the health and the identities of the individual, family, and community.
  • Analyze how non-curable infections, including HIV, affect more people than they infect.

USC 6.7 Assess how health promotions and advertising (related to but not limited to tobacco, alcohol, diabetes, and HIV) influence personal standards and behaviours and determine how and why certain groups of consumers (e.g., youth as ‘replacement’ smokers) are targeted.

  • Identify and evaluate local, provincial, and national health promotions

Mathematics

N6.5 Demonstrate understanding of percent (limited to whole numbers to 100) concretely, pictorially, and symbolically. [C, CN, PS, R, V]

  • Observe and describe examples of percents (whole numbered to 100) relevant to self, family, or community, represent the percent concretely or pictorially (possibly physically), and explain what the percent tells about the context in which it is being used
  • Solve situational questions, and provide justification for possible decisions, using whole-numbered percents to 100.
  • Create and explain representations (concrete, visual, or both) that establish relationships between whole number percents to 100, fractions, and decimals.
  • Write the percent modeled within a concrete or pictorial representation.
  • Explain why 100 is an important number when relating fractions, percents, and decimals.
  • Describe a situation in which 0% or 100% might be stated.

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade





All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Saskatchewan curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Science

IE7.2 Observe, illustrate, and analyze living organisms within local ecosystems as part of interconnected food webs, populations, and communities. [SI]

  • Classify organisms in a variety of ecosystems as producers, consumers, or decomposers and further classify consumers as herbivores, carnivores, or omnivores.
  • Construct a classification key, using appropriate scientific terminology, which will enable classmates todifferentiate between producers, consumers, and decomposers.

Social Studies

IN7.1 Investigate examples of conflict, cooperation, and interdependence between Canada and circumpolar and Pacific Rim countries.

  • Examine the mission, goals, and structure of an organization whose mandate is national or international co-operation (e.g., United Nations, NORAD, NAFTA, APEC, Organization of American States, Association of Southeast Asian Nations, Western Aboriginal Development Alliance).

IN7.2 Examine the effects of globalization on the lives of people in Canada and in circumpolar and Pacific Rim countries

  • Define globalization, and identify examples of globalization in the local community.

IN7.3 Analyze the relationship of technology to globalization.

  • Identify technological connections that exist in the student’s life, and classify them as local, national, or international.

DR7.1 Analyze and use various types of maps (that provide differing perspectives and information for differing purposes) in order to situate current issues in Canada, and in a selection of Pacific Rim and northern circumpolar countries.

  • Examine maps of various projections and scales (e.g., Mercator, Peters, circumpolar, plate tectonics) in order to determine the characteristics and application of each map.

PA7.2 Investigate the structures and processes of democratic government in Canada.

  • Compare the responsibilities of municipal, provincial or territorial, and federal and First Nations governments in Canada.
  • Describe the roles of the elected representatives in the local (reeve, mayor, councillor), provincial or territorial (member of the legislative assembly), federal (member of parliament), First Nations (councillor, chief) system of government and Métis governance structures.
  • Chart the structures of Canadian government at the local, provincial, and national levels.

Health Education

USC 7.2 Examine critically and use purposefully bloodborne pathogen information/ education, including HIV and Hepatitis C, for the purpose of committing to behaviours that do not put one at risk of infection or co-infection.

  • Distinguish between primary and secondary sources of HIV/ AIDS information, and of expert and non-expert sources.
  • Examine the role of and determine the influence of technology (e.g., radio, print, television, Internet, cell phones, personal listening devices) in gathering, processing, and using HIV/AIDS and Hepatitis C information.
  • Analyze implications of/of not evaluating sources of and information about blood-borne infections.

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Saskatchewan curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Science

CS8.1 Analyze the characteristics of cells, and compare structural and functional characteristics of plant and animal cells. [SI]

  • Explain that the cell is a living system that exhibits all the characteristics of life including growth, movement,reaction to stimulus, and reproduction.
  • Categorize organisms as single-celled and multi-cellular.
  • Observe and identify cell structures (e.g., cell wall, cell membrane, vacuole, nucleus, cytoplasm, mitochondria, and chloroplast) and identify which are found in plant cells and which are found in animal cells.

CS8.4 Analyze how the interdependence of organ systems contributes to the healthy functioning of the human body. [CP, DM, SI]

  • Select and synthesize information from various sources to illustrate examples of conflicting evidence regarding theways in which we should maintain our body (e.g., energy drinks, dairy products, vaccinations, and vitamin supplements).

Social Studies

IN8.2 Appraise the influence of immigration as a factor in Canadian cultural diversity.

  • Research reasons for diverse peoples choosing Canada as a home (e.g., economic opportunity, economic hardship or war in the country of origin, reunification of family, escape from religious or political oppression).

RW8.1 Analyze the social and environmental consequences of living in the Canadian mixed market economy based on consumerism.

  • Identify the purpose and characteristics of:
    • public enterprise
    • private enterprise

 


Health Education

USC 8.3 Investigate and analyze the impact of in/formal supports and services (including testing/ diagnostic services) available to individuals, families, and communities infected with/ affected by non-curable and serious but treatable infections/diseases (including HIV and Hepatitis C).

  • Locate and evaluate, according to student-generated criteria, both sources of and information about the supports needed/ wanted by individuals, families, and communities infected with/affected by non-curable or serious but treatable infections/diseases (including HIV and Hepatitis C)
  • Describe the effects of non-curable and serious but treatable infections/diseases, including HIV and Hepatitis on families and communities
  • Explore the consequences of having/not having access to treatment options (e.g., cost of medication) and supports (both formal and informal) for self, family, and community
  • Describe how misinformation and/or lack of understanding may influence the kinds of supports available to people infected with/affected by non-curable infections.

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Saskatchewan curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Science

RE9.1 Examine the process of and influences on the transfer of genetic information and the impact of that understanding on society past and present. [CP, DM]

  • Select and synthesize information from various sources to illustrate how developments in genetics, including gene therapy and genetic engineering, have had an impact on global and local food production, populations, the spread of disease, and the environment.

Social Studies

IN9.1 Explain what constitutes a society.

  • Relate the functions and services of institutions in the community (e.g., schools, churches, local governments, parents, Elders, traditional knowledge keepers) to the needs of the people in that community

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Saskatchewan curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Science

SCI10-CI1 Investigate career paths related to various branches and sub-branches of science. [DM]

  • Explore the breadth of science-related work roles and who is engaged in those work roles in the community. (STSE, S, A)
  • Develop a profile of a specific individual involved in a science career, addressing factors such as their educational and personal background, what drew them to their career, the focus of their work and their advice for others who wish to pursue a similar career. (STSE, S, A)
  • Research the educational qualifications of people engaged in science-related careers. (STSE, S, A)

Social Studies

  • Know that social organizations stem from and deal with the basic, universal problems of ordered, social life.
  • The Role of Government in Modern Democratic Societies
  • Know that government has come to play an increasingly important role within society.

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Saskatchewan curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Health Science 20

HS20-CE1 Analyze and explore health-science related occupations in Saskatchewan, Canada and the world. [CP, DM]

  • Generate a list of occupations that require a background in health science through research and/or participation in events such as a career fair or job shadow. (K, S)
  • Examine the roles, responsibilities, educational qualifications and personal and professional qualities common to people involved in health-science related jobs. (S, A)

HS20-HC1 Analyze how Western, Indigenous, traditional, complementary and alternative approaches to health care can contribute to a holistic (e.g., mental, emotional, physical and spiritual) perspective of health. [CP, DM, SI]

  • Assess how practitioners of Western, Indigenous, traditional, complementary and alternative approaches to health care address health, wellness, illness, disease, and treatment through beliefs and practices such as Circle of Life, disharmony of body energies, being symptom free and healthy lifestyle choices. (K, A, STSE)
  • Examine the significance of rituals, place-based ceremonies, plants, and traditional herbs in Indigenous and traditional approaches to health care. (K, A, STSE)
  • Assess the importance of clinical trial features (e.g., informed consent, randomized control trial, blind and double-blind protocols and placebos) in providing reliable scientific evidence to support Western approaches to health care. (STSE)

HS20-HC2 Examine how personal, cultural and societal beliefs affect ethical decisions

  • Pose questions about ethical dilemmas within health care. (K, S, A, STSE) b. Understand the core ethical questions to be considered 30 Health Science 20 regarding health care. [CP, DM, SI]
  • Contrast how procedures to prevent illness, such as immunizations, vitamin supplements, physical activity, nutrition and prayer, might be viewed from the perspective of Western, Indigenous, traditional, complementary and alternative approaches to health care. (K, A)
  • Recognize the importance of considering linguistic and cultural needs when providing health care services. (STSE, A)
  • Assess how various ethical considerations (e.g., personal beliefs, informed consent, the roles of institutional review boards and regulatory agencies) may influence an individual’s decision to participate in a clinical study of a new biomedical intervention (e.g., vaccine, drug, treatment, device or process). (STSE)

HS20-HB2 Investigate the effects of various injuries, disorders and diseases on human cells, tissues, organs and systems. [SI, DM]

  • Differentiate among the ways in which medical practitioners and the public use terms such as disease, illness, ailment, disorder, infection, medical condition, syndrome and abnormal condition. (STSE, K)
  • Investigate how the immune system uses a layered defense to respond to pathogens, including the difference between the innate and adaptive immune system.
  • Research the symptoms, possible causes, stages and scope (e.g., cells, tissues, organs and/or systems) of a pathology that affects one or more body systems. (K)
  • Outline the history of a disease or illness and its causes, including societal and cultural perspectives. (K, A, S, STSE)
  • Compare how bacteria (e.g., Salmonella, Streptococcus, and Escherichia coli) and viruses (e.g., common cold, influenza and herpes) differ in how they are transmitted, their impact on the human body and how each is treated. (K)
  • Analyze the role of homeostasis in various phenomena such as regulation, heart rate, breathing, urination, sweating, digestion, body temperature, blood composition and stress.
  • Analyze the role of homeostasis in various phenomena such as regulation, heart rate, breathing, urination, sweating, digestion, body temperature, blood composition and stress.

 


History 20 / World Issues

Unit 1 - Human Rights

Unit 4 - Production and wealth distribution

Unit 5 - Conflict & Global Issues


 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Saskatchewan curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Biology 30

BI30-LE1 Explore how scientific understandings of life and its characteristics change in light of new evidence. [CP, DM]

  • Explain what characteristics you use to define what is or what is not considered living. (A, K)
  • Explore how scientific definitions of life have changed over time as a result of advances in technologies and scientific understanding. (K, STSE)
  • Debate whether or not entities such as viruses, viroids and prions should be considered alive. (S, STSE)
  • Recognize the contribution of scientists (e.g., Francesco Redi, Louis Pasteur, Stanley Miller, Harold Urey and Lynn Margulis) 28 Biology 30 whose experiments contributed to a wider understanding of life from a biological perspective. (K, STSE)
  • Examine the impact of the cell theory and advances in microscopy on past and current scientific definitions of life. (K, STSE, A)

BI30-LE2 Examine the significance of evolution as a key unifying theme in biology through the principles, processes and patterns of biological evolution. [SI, DM]

  • Interpret cladograms and phylogenetic trees to determine evolutionary relationships among organisms. (S)

BI30-OL3 Explore how the dynamic nature of biological classification reflects advances in scientific understanding of relationships among organisms. [SI, CP]

  • Discuss how classification systems are designed by humans to meet various needs. (STSE, A)
  • Research the contributions of scientists, including Carl Linnaeus, in developing accepted scientific conventions for the naming of organisms. (K, S, STSE)
  • Discuss how the characteristics of the taxonomic hierarchy represent relationships among organisms. (STSE, K)
  • Discuss the challenges associated with classification, including defining taxa and classifying certain organisms, such as protists. (K, A)
  • Create and use dichotomous keys to gain insights into the challenges of biological classification. (STSE, S)
  • Critique the strengths and limitations of historical and contemporary systems of classifying living things. (K, A, STSE)
  • Develop generalizations about the value of biological classification systems. (A, STSE)

BI30-OL2 Compare the anatomies, physiologies and behaviours of multicellular organisms including protists, fungi, plants and animals. [SI]

  • Identify how multicellular organisms maintain homeostasis through processes such as biofeedback, fluid regulation and thermoregulation. (K)

BI30-GB3 Explore the impacts of historical, current and emerging biotechnologies on self, society and the environment. [CP, DM]

  • Identify examples of historical, current and emerging biotechnologies (e.g., selective breeding, applications of fermentation, genetic engineering, cloning, gene therapy, assistive reproductive technologies and synthetic biology). (K, A, STSE)
  • Explore how societal pressures such as food, energy and resource shortages can drive the development of biotechnologies. (A, K, STSE)
  • Research a medical (e.g., 3-D bio printing, personalized medicine, genetic testing and screening and gene therapy) or industrial (e.g., use of recombinant DNA, biofuels and bioremediation) application of biotechnology. (S, STSE)
  • Explore how the use and misuse of antibiotics has led to increased bacterial resistance, including the emergence of superbugs. (K, STSE)
  • Critique how individuals and groups use and misuse scientific information to support their positions regarding biotechnologies such as vaccines. (A, STSE)
  • Critique the media’s role in crafting public perception related to biotechnologies (e.g., vaccines, genetically modified organisms and genetic screening). (STSE, A, S)
  • Analyze the role of regulation and legislation in providing a level of public safety pertaining to applications of biotechnology. (STSE)

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

Last modified: 
Sep 14, 2020