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Nunavut Guide, Outcomes, and Lessons

Kids Boost Immunity matches the Alberta curriculum outcomes listed below. You can also read a description of the core lessons available for Alberta students. Each grade has a tailored selection of lessons that fit their curricular need. Please note that this is not an exhaustive list of the curricular fit - teachers on KBI have found many more curriculum connections than outlined here! Continue scrolling down to see a short description of the core lessons available for each grade.

 

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Nunavut curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Social studies

Essential Knowledge

Students will demonstrate knowledge of the following:

  1. the traditional way of life of the Aboriginal people of their region: (A)
    • their proper name (A)
    • the name of their language (A)
    • important aspects of their culture; their government: their beliefs; customs and morals (A)
    • their use of the land (A)
    • population distribution (A)
  2. the most significant changes that have occurred in regional lifestyle (B)
  3. the main causes of change in lifestyle (B)
  4. the major benefits and problems brought by change (B)
  5. the structure, sphere of authority and decision-making style of municipal governments and/or band councils (B)
  6. the locations, languages, customs, traditions and lifestyles of cultural groups across the North -C-
  7. the challenges and opportunities that arise from cultural diversity -C-
  8. opportunities for citizens' participation in community affairs -C-

Attitudes
Students will be encouraged to develop:

  1. respect for the lifestyle of the elders
  2. an understanding and appreciation of the need for rules
  3. respect for the people of other cultures
  4. appreciation of the value of understanding two or more languages
  5. concern for the needs of future generations

Current Events Focus
Students will focus on:

  1. news stories that report on archaeological and anthropological findings in the North  
  2. changes that are occurring in the North
  3. magazine and other articles that describe current lifestyles in various parts of the North

Science

LIFE SYSTEMS GRADE 4 - Habitats and Communities
General Learning Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the concepts of habitat and community and identify some factors that could affect habitats and communities of plants and animals.
  2. Investigate the dependency of plants and animals on their habitat and the interrelationships of the plants and animals living in a specific habitat.
  3. Describe ways in which humans can change habitats and the effects of these changes on the plants and animals within the habitats.

Specific Learning Outcomes
Understanding Basic Concepts

  1. Identify, through observation, various factors that affect plants and animals in specific habitat.
  2. Classify organisms according to their role in a food chain.
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of a food chain as a system in which energy from the sun is transferred eventually to animals.
  4. Be able to construct food chains of different plant and animal species, and classify animals as omnivore, carnivore, or herbivore.
  5. Describe structural adaptations of plants and animals that demonstrate a response to their environment.
  6. Recognize that animals and plants live in specific habitats because they are dependent on those habitats and have adapted to them.
  7. Classify plants and animals that students have observed in local habitats according to similarities and differences.

Developing Skills of Inquiry, Design, and Communication

  1. Formulate questions about and identify the needs of animals and plants in a particular habitat, and explore possible answers to these questions and ways of meeting these needs.
  2. Predict the structural adaptations that help plants/animals survive in their environment.
  3. Plan investigations for some of these answers and solutions, identify variables that need to be held constant to ensure a fair test, and identify criteria for assessing solutions.
  4. Use appropriate vocabulary, including correct science and technology terms, in describing their investigations, explorations, and observations.
  5. Compile data gathered through investigation in order to record and present results, using tally charts, tables, and labeled graphs produced by hand or with a computer.
  6. Communicate the procedures and results of investigations for specific purposes and to specific audiences using electronic media, oral presentations, written notes and descriptions, drawings, pictograms and charts.

Relating Science and Technology to the World Outside the School

  1. Describe ways in which humans are dependent on plants and animals.
  2. Describe ways in which humans can affect the natural world.
  3. Construct food chains that include different plant and animal species and humans.
  4. Show the effects on plants and animals of the loss of their natural habitat.
  5. Investigate ways in which the extinction of a plant or animal species affects the rest of the natural community and humans.

Health

MENTAL AND EMOTIONAL WELL BEING

Self-Awareness
Decision Making

Students will:

  1. identify the possible effects of various choices
  2. identify reasons for individual decisions

Decision Making

Students will:

  1. identify decisions that peers may influence
  2. identify ways peers influence them

GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

Disease Prevention

Students will:

  1. explain what communicable diseases are
  2. explain what non-communicable diseases are
  3. distinguish between communicable and non-communicable diseases

Health Care System

Students will:

  1. describe the services provided by health care supports

FAMILY LIFE/p>

Families

Students will:

  1. identify family traditions
  2. identify the importance of traditions

 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Nunavut curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Social studies

Essential Knowledge
Students will demonstrate knowledge of the following:

14. concepts of democracy, government, jurisdiction, law, rights and responsibilities, citizenship and participation -C-
15. the structure, nature, jurisdiction and decision-making style of regional or tribal councils -C-
16. the degree of authority of regional councils and possible changes to that degree in the future -C-
17. other quasi-governing bodies, such as school and health boards -C-
18. opportunities for citizens' participation in regional affairs -C-

Skills
Processing Skills
Students will be able to:

1. use and make maps of the North, using a key or legend for symbols, using cardinal directions, and relating latitude and longitude to geographical features.
2. use maps of different scale when comparing distances and locating resources
3. use definite, indefinite and relative time concepts in referring to past events
4. figure length of time between two given dates
5. make large scale timelines to show the relative occurrence of historical events
6. draw conclusions about how the physical characteristics of a region resources, occupations, population distribution and transportation
7. synthesize information from different sources to create a total picture
8. generalize, while avoiding both stereotyping and superficial assessments

Communication Skills
Students will be able to:

  1. use charts and graphs to illustrate and explain variations in resource development
  2. collect and organize information on a topic, using a simple outline, webbing etc.
  3. summarize information from a variety of sources by writing well organized paragraphs supporting main ideas with appropriate details
  4. write a research paper that is properly paragraphed and is accompanied by a simple bibliography
     

Attitudes
Students will be encouraged to develop:

3. respect for people whose lifestyle and history are different from their own
4. appreciation of those in the past who have contributed to the good things in our lives today

7. respect for the democratic process
8. responsibility for their own actions


Science

LIFE SYSTEMS Grade 5 - Human Organ Systems

General Learning Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the structure, form and function of the respiratory, circulatory, digestive, excretory, integument, and nervous systems, and the interactions of organs within each system.
  2. Investigate the structure, form and function of the major organs of the respiratory, circulatory, digestive, excretory, integument, and nervous systems.
  3. Demonstrate understanding of factors that contribute to good health and a healthy lifestyle.

Specific Learning Outcomes
Understanding Basic Concepts

  1. Identify the cell as the basic unit of life.
  2. Describe the basic structure, form and function of the major organs in the respiratory, circulatory, digestive, excretory, integument, and nervous system.
  3. Describe using models and simulations, ways in which the skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems work together to produce movement.
  4. Identify the skin as an organ and explain its purpose.
  5. Explain what happens to excess nutrients that are not immediately used by the body.

Developing Skills of Inquiry, Design, and Communication

  1. Formulate questions about and identify the needs of humans, and explore possible answers to these questions and ways of meeting these needs.
  2. Plan investigations for some of these answers and solutions, identify variables that need to be held constant to ensure a fair test and identify criteria for assessing solutions.
  3. Use appropriate vocabulary, including correct science and technology terms, in describing their investigations, explorations, and observations.
  4. Compile data gathered through investigation in order to record and present results, using tally charts, tables and labeled graphs produced by hand or with a computer.
  5. Communicate the procedures and results of investigations for specific purposes and to specific audiences using electronic media, oral presentations, written notes, descriptions, drawings, and charts.

Health

MENTAL AND EMOTIONAL WELL BEING

Students will:

  1. identify advertising techniques used to persuade

Making Decisions

Students will:

  1. practise designing an advertisement using one or more persuasion techniques

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Nunavut curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Social studies

Essential Knowledge
Students will demonstrate knowledge of the following:

4. the relationship between local, regional, territorial and federal governments (A)
5. opportunities for citizens' participation in territorial affairs (A)

10. the present peoples in various regions of Canada: their languages, lifestyles and economic activities -C-
11. the way in which Canadians' lives are affected by the geography of their various regions -C-
12. the ways in which Canadians in different regions relate to, and depend on, one another (BC)
13. the challenges and opportunities facing Canada as a multicultural nation -C-

Skills
Processing Skills
Students will be able to:

1. identify features on a topographical map
2. identify locations on a map from bearings and provide the bearings for selected locations
3. recognize and use bar scales on maps
4. use specific date-events as points of reference for the passage of time
6. choose research books appropriate for various purposes: dictionaries, encylopedias, reference books and atlases
7. locate information by using key words, table of contents, index and glossary
8. recognize agreement or contradiction in two or more sources about a given topic
9. give a general interpretation of relationships shown on a graph

Attitudes
Students will be encouraged to develop:

4. awareness and acceptance of civic responsibilities
5. responsibilities for one's own actions
6. respect for the democratic process
7. self-confidence (e.g., by being able to participate in decision-making processes)
8. objectivity through self-analysis and criticism
9. openness to new ideas and values


Science

LIFE SYSTEMS GRADE 6 - Diversity of Living Things

General Learning Outcomes&

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of ways in which classification systems are used to understand the diversity of living things and the interrelationships among living things.
  2. Investigate classification systems and some of the processes of life common to all animals.
  3. Describe ways in which classification systems can be used in everyday life.

Specific Learning Outcomes
Understanding Basic Concepts

1. Explain why formal classification systems are usually based on structural character rather than on physical appearance or behavioural characteristics.
7. Describe microscopic living things using appropriate tools (hand lens) to assist them with their observations of pond life.
8. Describe ways in which microorganisms, like larger creatures meet their basic needs.

Developing Skills of Inquiry, Design, and Communication

1. Formulate questions about and identify the needs of different types of animals and explore possible answers to these questions and ways of meeting these needs.
2. Plan investigations for some of these answers and solutions, identifying variables that need to be held constant to ensure fair testing and identifying criteria for assessing key solutions.
3. Use appropriate vocabulary, including correct science and technology terms, in describing their investigations and observations.
4. Compile data gathered through investigation in order to record and present results, using charts, tables and labeled graphs produced by hand or with a computer.
5. Communicate the procedures and results of investigations for specific purposes and to specific audiences, using electronic media, oral presentations, written notes and descriptions, charts, graphs, and drawings.

Relating Science and Technology to the World Outside the School

1. Identify various kinds of classification systems, from a variety of sources, that are based on specific criteria and used to organize information.
2. Identify inherited characteristics and learned or behavioural characteristics.
3. Explain why characteristics related to physical appearance or behaviour are not suitable attributes for classifying living things.
4. Identify various kinds of plants and animal organism in a given plot using biological classification keys.
5. Describe specific characteristics or adaptations that enable each group of vertebrates to live in its particular habitat and explain the importance of maintaining that habitat for the survival of the species.


Health

MENTAL AND EMOTIONAL WELL BEING
Relationships
Students will:

1. describe discrimination
2. describe how discrimination affects people
3. describe how people learn to discriminate

Decision-Making
Students will:

1. describe how group decisions are made
2. identify situations in which groups might be involved in decision-making
3. demonstrate making a group decision

GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT
Disease Prevention
Students will:

1. identify ways in which diseases are transmitted
2. name the routes of germ entry into the body

Disease Prevention
Students will:

1. identify the cause, nature and seriousness of AIDS
2. describe how the disease AIDS is transmitted
3. identify ways to prevent the spread of AIDS

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Nunavut curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Social studies

Skills
Processing Skills
Students will be able to:

1. identify and define topics
2. differentiate between main and supporting ideas
3. acquire information to find answers through listening, observing, reading and utilizing community resources
4. seek and work with information from more than one source
5. make notes (jottings, point form, webbing) that outline the main and related ideas from reading, listening and observing
6. categorize information
7. compare information about one topic from two or more sources to see if they are identical, similar, parallel or inconsistent, unrelated or contradictory
8. identify assumptions underlying various positions taken on an issue
9. distinguish between well founded and ill founded opinions
10. venture predictions based on acquired information

Communication Skills
Students will be able to:

2. read, listen and observe to acquire specific information
5. write a clear and effective short report
6. document sources of information
7. present information from maps demonstrating the use of symbols, location, direction, distance, scale and physical geography


Science

Skill Outcomes For All Units

Ask questions about the relationships between and among observable variables, and plan investigations to address those questions

  • identify science-related issues
  • identify questions to investigate arising from practical problems and issues
  • state a prediction and a hypothesis based on background information or an observed pattern of events
  • formulate operational definitions of major variables and other aspects of their investigations

Health

GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

Disease Prevention
Students will:

1. identify common health problems of adolescents
2. describe ways to prevent common adolescent health problems

Sexually Transmitted Disease

Students will:

1. define sexually transmitted diseases


 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Nunavut curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Social studies

Essential Knowledge
Students will demonstrate knowledge of the following:

3. the role that world exploration and trade and the industrial revolution played in changing middle societies (B)
4. the role that science plays in shaping modern societies [C]
5. the role that transportation and communication technologies play in shaping modern societies [C]
6. the role that commerce and technology have played in bringing about social change throughout human history [A,B,C]
7. the essential features of various kinds of government [A,B,C]
8. the problems and expectations of developing nations [C]
9. the main social and ethical issues of the modern age [C]

Skills
Processing Skills
Students will be able to:

1. identify possible sources and locations of information (print and non-print as well as knowledgeable individuals)
5. draw inferences, make generalizations and reach conclusions from evidence about our changing world
8. identify values underlying various positions taken on an issue
9. distinguish between well founded and ill-founded opinions
10. identify fact, opinion, bias and propaganda
11. identify the purpose, message and intended audience of visual communications
12. identify and evaluate alternative answers, conclusions, solutions or decisions regarding issues used for inquiry and research

Communication Skills
Students will be able to:

1. interpret opinions presented by visual means
2. convey thoughts, feelings and information in a speech on an issue
3. organize written material under topical headings
4. support an opinion with factual information
6. write an essay on an issue from several points of view and with sensitivity to more than one perspective
7. document sources of information and ideas


Science

Unit B: Cells and Systems 

1. Investigate living things; and identify and apply scientific ideas used to interpret their general structure, function and organization

  • investigate and describe example scientific studies of the characteristics of living things (e.g., investigate and describe an ongoing scientific study of a locally-found organism)

2. Investigate and describe the role of cells within living things

  • describe the role of cells as a basic unit of life
  • analyze similarities and differences between single-celled and multicelled organisms (e.g., compare, in general terms, an amoeba and a grizzly bear, a single-celled alga and a poplar tree)

4. Describe areas of scientific investigation leading to new knowledge about body systems and to new medical applications

  • identify examples of research into functions and dysfunctions of human cells, organs or body systems
  • describe ways in which research about cells, organs and systems has brought about improvements in human health and nutrition (e.g., development of medicines; immunization procedures; diets based on the needs of organs, such as the heart)
  • investigate and describe factors that affect the healthy function of the human respiratory, circulatory and digestive systems (e.g., investigate the effect of illness, aging or air quality on the function of the respiratory system)

Health

FAMILY LIFE

Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Students will:

1. identify the causes, characteristics, consequences, treatment and prevention of common sexually transmitted diseases

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Nunavut curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Social studies

Essential Knowledge
Students will demonstrate knowledge of the following:

1. the physical geography of Canada (A)
2. the political regions of Canada (A)

Skills
Processing Skills
Students will be able to:

1. identify relations among variables with charts, graphs and tables
6. arrange events, facts and ideas in sequence (occurrence/importance)
7. compare sources of information for accuracy, relevancy, reliability and validity
8. draw inferences from information
9. make generalizations from broadly-based authenticated information
10. identify and evaluate alternative answers, conclusions, solutions or decisions

Communication Skills
Students will be able to:

3. convey thoughts, feelings and information in a debate on an issue
4. document and credit sources


 

Health

MENTAL AND EMOTIONAL WELL BEING
Career and Life Preparation                        
Students will:

1. define career
2. identify personal interests, abilities and attitudes that influence career and life choices
3. identify career and life choices that correlate with personal interests, abilities and attitudes
4. examine the requirements for a variety of career and life choices

GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT
Body Systems                        
Students will:

1. describe how germs enter the body
2. describe the body's first two lines of defence
3. describe how the immune system helps protect the body from disease
4. describe common problem conditions related to the immune system


Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade



All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Nunavut curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Social studies

Skills and Processes

Dimensions of Thinking

Students will:

S.1 develop skills of critical thinking and creative thinking:

  • evaluate ideas and information from multiple sources
  • determine relationships among multiple and varied sources of information
  • assess the validity of information based on context, bias, sources, objectivity, evidence or reliability
  • predict likely outcomes based on factual information
  • evaluate personal assumptions and opinions to develop an expanded appreciation of a topic or an issue
  • synthesize information from contemporary and historical issues to develop an informed position
  • evaluate the logic of assumptions underlying a position
  • assemble seemingly unrelated information to support an idea or to explain an event
  • analyze current affairs from a variety of perspectives
  • Research for Deliberative Inquiry

Students will:

S.7 apply the research process:

  • develop, express and defend an informed position on an issue
  • reflect on changes of points of view or opinion based on information gathered and research conducted
  • draw pertinent conclusions based on evidence derived from research
  • demonstrate proficiency in the use of research tools and strategies to investigate issues
  • consult a wide variety of sources, including oral histories, that reflect varied perspectives on particular issues
  • integrate and synthesize argumentation and evidence to provide an informed opinion on a research question or an issue of inquiry
  • develop, refine and apply questions to address an issue
  • select and analyze relevant information when conducting research
  • plan and perform complex searches, using digital sources
  • use calendars, time management or project management software to assist in organizing the research process
  • generate new understandings of issues by using some form of technology to facilitate the process
  • record relevant data for acknowledging sources of information, and cite sources and correctly respect ownership and integrity of information

Communication
Students will:

S.9 develop skills of media literacy:

  • assess the authority, reliability and validity of electronically accessed information
  • evaluate the validity of various points of view presented in the media
  • appraise information from multiple sources, evaluating each source in terms of the author’s perspective or bias and use of evidence
  • analyze the impact of various forms of media, identifying complexities and discrepancies in the information and making distinctions between sound generalizations and misleading oversimplification
  • demonstrate discriminatory selection of electronically accessed information that is relevant to a particular topic


 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Nunavut curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Biology 20

Unit B: Ecosystems and Population Change

  • 20–B1.5k Explain the fundamental principles of taxonomy and binomial nomenclature, using modes of nutrition at the kingdom level and morphological characteristics at the genus species level
  • 20–B1.3s analyze data and apply mathematical and conceptual models to develop and assess possible solutions
    • Apply classification and binomial nomenclature systems in a field study (AI–NS1)

Unit D: Human Systems

  • 20–D3.2s Conduct investigations into relationships between and among observable variables and use a broad range of tools and techniques to gather and record data and information

Science 24

Unit C – Disease Defence and Human Health Describe the natural mechanisms that protect the human organism from pathogens

  • Explain the role of the human organism’s physical defences in preventing infection by pathogens (e.g., skin, mucus membranes, tears, saliva, digestive system)
    • Investigate and explain the role of blood components in controlling pathogens (e.g., white blood cells and antibodies)
    • Identify the major cellular and chemical components of the human immune system
    • Describe, in general terms, how the immune system protects the body by attacking foreign or abnormal proteins
    • Compare forms of immunity in the human organism, and explain how immunity is established (e.g., natural and artificial immunization)
    • Explain how specific antibiotic therapies, vaccines or medications are used to treat or prevent a disease (e.g., measles, rabies, tetanus, smallpox, tuberculosis)
    • Describe how the overuse and improper use of antibiotics may lead to the development of resistance in bacteria (e.g., use of prescription antibiotics for viral infections)

Social Studies

3 - Should internationalism be pursued?

  • 3.1 appreciate that nations and states engage in regional and global affairs for a variety of reasons (GC, C)
  • 3.2 appreciate the impacts of nation and state involvement in regional and global affairs on individual and collective identities (GC, C)
  • 3.3 demonstrate a global consciousness with respect to the human condition and global affairs (C, GC) 
    3.4 examine the motives of nation and state involvement or noninvolvement in international affairs (economic stability, self-determination, peace, security, humanitarianism) (GC, LPP, TCC)
    3.5 explore understandings of internationalism (GC, PADM)
    3.6 examine how internationalism can be promoted by foreign policy (multilateralism,supranationalism, peacekeeping, foreign aid, international law and agreements) (GC, PADM, ER)
    3.7 analyze the extent to which selected organizations promote internationalism (United Nations, World Council of Indigenous Peoples, European Union, l’Organisation internationale de la Francophonie, Arctic Council) (GC, PADM, ER)
    3.8 examine impacts of the pursuit of internationalism in addressing contemporary global issues (conflict, poverty, debt, disease, environment, human rights) (GC, PADM, ER)
    3.9 evaluate the extent to which nationalism must be sacrificed in the interest of internationalism (GC, PADM, ER)

Social Sciences

There are a number of subjects where t

There are a number of subjects where there is a fit:

Geography 20-30
Political Science 20-30
 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

All Subjects

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information

The Critical Thinking and Evaluating Information lessons on Kids Boost Immunity are aligned with multiple subjects within the Nunavut curriculum. These lessons provide examples of how misinformation can sway opinion, often by creating a sense of fear. A checklist evaluation method enables student to assess the trustworthiness of information sources. Other evaluation strategies include learning how to recognize personal bias and using a scientific approach to test ideas. For older grades there are lessons in designing experiments, creating a working hypotheses, exploring biases, and understanding correlation versus causation.


Social Studies

To what extent should my actions as a citizen be shaped by an ideology?

  • 4.2 exhibit a global consciousness with respect to the human condition and world issues (C, GC)

Biology 30

Unit A: Nervous and Endocrine Systems

  • 30–A2.2k Describe the function of the hormones of the principal endocrine glands, i.e., thyroidstimulating hormone (TSH)/thyroxine, calcitonin/parathyroid hormone (PTH), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)/cortisol, glucagon/insulin, human growth hormone (hGH), antidiuretic hormone (ADH), epinephrine, aldosterone, and describe how they maintain homeostasis through feedback
  • 30–A2.3k Explain the metabolic roles hormones may play in homeostasis; i.e., thyroxine in metabolism; insulin, glucagon and cortisol in blood sugar regulation; hGH in growth; ADH in water regulation; aldosterone in sodium ion regulation

Unit B: Reproduction and Development

  • 30–B2.2sts Explain why decisions regarding the application of scientific and technological development involve a variety of perspectives, including social, cultural, environmental, ethical and economic considerations

Unit D: Population and Community Dynamics

General Outcome 1
Specific Outcomes for Skills (Nature of Science Emphasis)
Initiating and Planning

  • 30–D1.1s formulate questions about observed relationships and plan investigations of questions, ideas, problems and issues
    • identify a question about the resistance of bacteria to specific antibiotics or about the resistance of plants to specific herbicides (IP–NS1).

Social Sciences

>There are a number of subjects where there is a fit:

Geography 20-30
Political Science 20-30
 

Click on the headings below to see a description of all the core lessons for this grade

Dernière modification: 
24 décembre 2020